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I am running two queries to my database for pagination reasons. As such, each query is nearly identical. My COUNT(*) query is not returning the number of results that the non-count query is. I'm baffled as to why this is the case. The queries are below.

SELECT p.host_id, p.rating_support, p.rating_tech, MAX(p.rating_overall) AS rating_overall, p.publish_rating, h.name, prices.price, prices.term_duration
FROM plans p
INNER JOIN hosts AS h ON h.id = p.host_id
INNER JOIN (SELECT plan_id, price, term_duration FROM prices WHERE price > 0 AND price < 50 AND term_duration = 1) prices ON prices.plan_id = p.id
WHERE p.published = 1 AND h.published = 1
GROUP BY p.host_id
ORDER BY rating_overall desc LIMIT 0, 12

SELECT COUNT(*) AS count
FROM plans p
INNER JOIN hosts AS h ON h.id = p.host_id
INNER JOIN (SELECT plan_id, price, term_duration FROM prices WHERE price > 0 AND price < 50 AND term_duration = 1) prices ON prices.plan_id = p.id
WHERE p.published = 1 AND h.published = 1
GROUP BY p.host_id

I'm not an expert at MySQL. Besides the count not providing the correct number of results, the non-count query works perfectly.

Any light on this problem would be great.

share|improve this question
    
I see that you have a LIMIT on your first query but not on the second. This might be limiting results that you want to consider. –  Andrew Jul 1 '12 at 4:37
    
Hello @Andrew, yes the first query must limit the results for pagination reasons. For instance, the first page will display up to 12 results. The second page will display another 12 results, using the limit to offset. The second query should not be limited as we need to know the full number of results to determine how many pages we'll have. My issues is, the first query returns 6 results and the second query COUNT(*) returns 3. How can this happen? –  Akaishen Jul 1 '12 at 4:47
    
I'd suspect it's the MAX that's not in the count query. That will eliminate records that count does not. –  Jesse Jul 1 '12 at 5:10
1  
@AdrianCornish - It's not strange at all. SELECT COUNT(*) FROM table GROUP BY x will return one row per distinct value of x, and report how many rows of data are aggregated together for each distinct value of x. It's just like SELECT x, COUNT(*) FROM table GROUP BY x. So, if the first query give 6 rows, the second query should give 6 rows too, and the results be how many rows of data have been aggregated together per distinct value of p.host_id. –  MatBailie Jul 1 '12 at 8:27
2  
@Akaishen - Your COUNT(*) query has GROUP BY p.host_id. This means return one row per distinct value of p.host id. This is why both queries return 6 rows. Also, COUNT(*) tells you how many rows were aggregated together (by the GROUP BY) to form that one output row. COUNT(distinct p.host_id) instead tells you how many distinct values of p.host_id exist in that one output row. So, either use COUNT(distinct p.host_id) and remove the GROUP BY, or do what @biziclop suggests. Use a nested query to count the rows in the results, rather than counting the rows in the input –  MatBailie Jul 1 '12 at 8:38
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

With the help of Dems' comment (hunt down and upvote him somewhere :), I created this query. Notice that I removed the subquery, because it seemed unnecessary:

SELECT
  COUNT( DISTINCT p.host_id )
FROM       plans p
INNER JOIN hosts h ON h.id = p.host_id
INNER JOIN prices  ON prices.plan_id = p.id
                  AND prices.price > 0
                  AND prices.price < 50
                  AND prices.term_duration = 1
WHERE p.published = 1
  AND h.published = 1

My original answer:

To get the number of total row, you have to wrap the GROUP BY query into an outer SELECT:

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM (
  SELECT NULL -- we are just counting, so we need no actual data -> a bit faster
  FROM       plans p
  INNER JOIN hosts h ON h.id = p.host_id
  INNER JOIN prices  ON prices.plan_id = p.id
                    AND prices.price > 0
                    AND prices.price < 50
                    AND prices.term_duration = 1
  WHERE p.published = 1
    AND h.published = 1
  GROUP BY p.host_id
) AS all_rows_without_data

Or you could use SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS + FOUND_ROWS()

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/information-functions.html#function_found-rows

A SELECT statement may include a LIMIT clause to restrict the number of rows the server returns to the client. In some cases, it is desirable to know how many rows the statement would have returned without the LIMIT, but without running the statement again. To obtain this row count, include a SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS option in the SELECT statement, and then invoke FOUND_ROWS() afterward:

First, simply select the required rows, but add SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS:

SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS
  p.host_id, p.rating_support, p.rating_tech,
  MAX(p.rating_overall) AS rating_overall,
  p.publish_rating, h.name, prices.price, prices.term_duration
FROM       plans p
INNER JOIN hosts AS h ON h.id = p.host_id
INNER JOIN prices  ON prices.plan_id = p.id
                  AND prices.price > 0
                  AND prices.price < 50
                  AND prices.term_duration = 1
WHERE p.published = 1 AND h.published = 1
GROUP BY p.host_id
ORDER BY rating_overall desc
LIMIT 0, 12;

Second, get the number of rows that would have been returned if there weren't a LIMIT statement in the first query:

SELECT FOUND_ROWS();

Update: SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS + FOUND_ROWS() doesn't seem very reliable, always returs zero for unknown reason (not just me: FOUND_ROWS() keeps returning 0 ):

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/7304d/8

share|improve this answer
2  
Or... As the original query is SELECT z, a, b, c FROM y GROUP BY z it can be changed to SELECT COUNT(distinct z) FROM y with no GROUP BY at all. –  MatBailie Jul 1 '12 at 8:30
    
Thanks, true! If you create an answer from it, i will delete my own. –  biziclop Jul 1 '12 at 8:37
    
Mine is an alternative and yours is a valid answer. I don't want you to delete it, so I'm not going to post my answer. But I'd be happy for you to add it to your own :) [One reason to use your version is for testing - the less alterations you make to a query to test it the better. My suggestion could be a tiny bit quicker, and slightly more concise, but yours ensures that the original query has been tested, rather than a similar query; and similar means introducing human error.] –  MatBailie Jul 1 '12 at 8:41
    
Thank you everyone for clearly explaining what was happening. I've learned a lot from your posts and will use the COUNT(DISTINCT p.host_id) to get the correct count of rows. I have done some reading on SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS and determined that it wasn't reliable enough to use. Nonetheless, I chose this answer because it was the most complete, providing the most options for a solution. Thanks for all the help! –  Akaishen Jul 1 '12 at 18:00
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The result of your second query would return the same number of rows, but the first row won't give you back the total.

The results would give the count for each group per row:

3
5
1
6
etc.
etc.

To get the result into one row, use COUNT(DISTINCT p.host_id) or array_sum() in PHP on the full result set.

share|improve this answer
    
It's certainly -not- just drop the GROUP by. In your example that would return 3+5+1+6+etc+etc. If the OP drops the GROUP BY the OP must use COUNT(distinct p.host_id) as well. See my comments above. –  MatBailie Jul 1 '12 at 8:44
    
@Dems of course, I was sleeping, thanks! –  Jack Jul 1 '12 at 8:53
    
Thanks @Jack for your post. It's the answer I was looking for though is included with biziclop's answer. I'll give you an up-vote for the help though. :) –  Akaishen Jul 1 '12 at 18:01
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