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I have a code using protected field in super class. How can I avoid it, because I think all field should be private?

 /** "Abstract Builder" */
 abstract class PizzaBuilder {
    protected Pizza pizza;

    public Pizza getPizza() { return pizza; }
    public void createNewPizzaProduct() { pizza = new Pizza(); }

    public abstract void buildDough();
    public abstract void buildSauce();
    public abstract void buildTopping();
 }

 /** "ConcreteBuilder" */
 class HawaiianPizzaBuilder extends PizzaBuilder {
    public void buildDough()   { pizza.setDough("cross"); }
    public void buildSauce()   { pizza.setSauce("mild"); }
    public void buildTopping() { pizza.setTopping("ham+pineapple"); }
 }

 /** "ConcreteBuilder" */
 class SpicyPizzaBuilder extends PizzaBuilder {
    public void buildDough()   { pizza.setDough("pan baked"); }
    public void buildSauce()   { pizza.setSauce("hot"); }
    public void buildTopping() { pizza.setTopping("pepperoni+salami"); }
 }
share|improve this question
2  
You can best avoid this problem by changing your thinking. There's nothing wrong with using protected fields the way they're intended to be used. – Michael Myers Jul 1 '12 at 4:38
1  
Can you code a setter and getter in the super class, then use super.getter method to access them? – Logan Jul 1 '12 at 4:39
    
@MichaelMyers: thanks for your answer. But this code allow all classes in the same package access this protected field and it may be dangerous. – Bood Carley Jul 1 '12 at 4:39
    
@Logan: thanks for your answer, but all classes can access this field via setter/getter method. But I think this solution is better the original. – Bood Carley Jul 1 '12 at 4:41
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use getPizza() in the child classes.

so :

 public void buildDough()   { pizza.setDough("cross"); }

becomes

public void buildDough()   { getPizza().setDough("cross"); }
share|improve this answer

You can always make Hawaiian and Spicy pizza builders public and Pizza field protected.

public abstract class PizzaBuilder {
    protected Pizza pizza;
    ...
 }

 /** "ConcreteBuilder" */
 public class HawaiianPizzaBuilder : PizzaBuilder {
     ...
 }

 /** "ConcreteBuilder" */
 public class SpicyPizzaBuilder : PizzaBuilder {
     ...
 }
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't make any sense. The private 'pizza' member would not be accessible by HawaiianPizzaBuilder or SpicyPizzaBuilder without some sort of access, be it protected, or getter/setter methods. – Ben Lakey Jul 1 '12 at 5:58
    
Right, I meant protected. Sorry. – safejrz Jul 1 '12 at 18:55
    
Edited it to reflect that, and did an undo on my downvote. – Ben Lakey Jul 4 '12 at 18:37

You respond to a comment thus:

@Logan: thanks for your answer, but all classes can access this field via setter/getter method. But I think this solution is better the original.

If you want to stop that, then maybe the answer is to change the visibility of the getter method, and not provide a setter at all.


Actually, the overall design looks a bit odd. You've got a create method that doesn't return the object that it creates, and no obvious way for the subclasses' build methods to be called. (Perhaps you should "review" the Factory Object design pattern.)

A re-think at this level would make it clear that the pizza variable and its getter can and should be hidden from outside view.

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