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I examined memory mapped files to check their performance effect and while doing it I noticed, that if I recreate BinaryWriter, every time I'm going to write to file, it makes my code run 30% faster.

Would anyone have an explanation?

This code runs 30% faster than the one below:

 using (MemoryMappedFile mmf = MemoryMappedFile.CreateOrOpen("testmap", 1000000000))
 {
    DateTime dt;
    bool mutexCreated;
    Mutex mutex = new Mutex(false, "testmapmutex", out mutexCreated);
    using (MemoryMappedViewStream stream = mmf.CreateViewStream())
    {
       dt = DateTime.Now;
       for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
       {
           BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(stream); // In or out?
           try
           {
               mutex.WaitOne();
               writer.Write(i);
               mutex.ReleaseMutex();
           }
       }
    }
 }

This code runs 30% slower than the one above:

 using (MemoryMappedFile mmf = MemoryMappedFile.CreateOrOpen("testmap", 1000000000))
 {
    DateTime dt;
    bool mutexCreated;
    Mutex mutex = new Mutex(false, "testmapmutex", out mutexCreated);
    using (MemoryMappedViewStream stream = mmf.CreateViewStream())
    {
       dt = DateTime.Now;
       BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(stream); // In or out?
       for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
       {
           try
           {
               mutex.WaitOne();
               writer.Write(i);
               mutex.ReleaseMutex();
           }
       }
    }
 }

Edit:

Code should compile now.

New observations:

If I'm compiling in "Release" (instead debug) the problem is gone and results makes sense When running the code on server with W2008 (instead of on PC with W7) problem is gone and results make sense

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1  
What you've posted wouldn't compile, please provide a more complete example. Also (assuming dt is intended for doing the timing) use System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch to perform your timings. –  mlorbetske Jul 1 '12 at 7:49
    
Aso, you aren't disposing the writer; that could mean here is unfleshed buffered data left in the writer. –  Marc Gravell Jul 1 '12 at 8:07
    
Using the Mutex that often means you are not testing BinaryWriter - you are testing the Mutex performance. –  usr Jul 1 '12 at 10:40

1 Answer 1

I have tested your code and it runs as follows. Used System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch to measure elapsed time.

BinaryWriter within the loop: 4815537 ticks BinaryWriter outside the loop : 4168415 ticks

This is the expected normal behavior.

But having said that since you are not disposing BinaryWriter after instantiating within the for loop you are committing a grave mistake. If you correct that mistake then your code won't run.

Wrong code

for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
{
   using (BinaryWriter writer = new BinaryWriter(stream)) 
   // this will force disposing of writer, but will also close the base 
   // stream instance too. 
   {
           // In or out?
           try
           {
              mutex.WaitOne();
              writer.Write(i);
              mutex.ReleaseMutex();
           }
           catch (Exception e)
           {
               Console.WriteLine(e);
           }
    }
 }
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