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I have a method:

public void StoreNumberInSmallestType(ValueType number)
{
    if (numberTypes == null)
        numberTypes = new List<Type>() { typeof(sbyte), typeof(short), typeof(int), typeof(long), typeof(float), typeof(double) };

    foreach (Type t in numberTypes)
    {
        try
        {
            var converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(t);
            value = converter.ConvertTo(number, t);

            Type = value.GetType();

            return;
        }

        catch (OverflowException) { }
    }
}

The method is inside a class where the variable value is defined as dynamic.

When used like this:

StoreNumberInSmallestType(Math.Pow(200, 100));

value ends up being Infinity. If I step through the process, I find that the value of number is not Infinity, but is the result expressed in scientific notation. Something bad is happening whenever number gets converted and stored inside value. Does anybody know why number holds the correct value, but value does not?

EDIT:

Here is a complete code sample:

Main:

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Class1 c1 = new Class1();
            c1.StoreNumberInSmallestType(Math.Pow(200, 100));
        }
    }
}

Class:

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    public class Class1
    {
        List<Type> numberTypes;
        dynamic value;
        public Type Type { get; set; }

        public void StoreNumberInSmallestType(ValueType number)
        {
            if (numberTypes == null)
                numberTypes = new List<Type>() { typeof(sbyte), typeof(short), typeof(int), typeof(long), typeof(float), typeof(double) };

            foreach (Type t in numberTypes)
            {
                try
                {
                    var converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(t);
                    value = converter.ConvertTo(number, t);

                    Type = value.GetType();

                    return;
                }

                catch (OverflowException) { }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You code does not compile, you are missing some essential parts here. Is the code within a generic class? –  Albin Sunnanbo Jul 1 '12 at 5:36
    
sorry bout that, lemme just post an entire example scenario. –  Thick_propheT Jul 1 '12 at 5:41
1  
It might be better to, instead of using try-catch, rather test for if a value is larger than the maximum of each type before converting. –  benjer3 Jul 1 '12 at 5:42
    
@benjer3 hmm... hadn't thought of that. I'll give it a shot, thanks. –  Thick_propheT Jul 1 '12 at 5:49
1  
Oh, how about a dictionary of type Dictionary<Type, double>. Each double would be the max value of the corresponding type. You can then foreach over the it and, if number is less than the value of the KeyValuePair, convert it to the type of the key and return. –  benjer3 Jul 1 '12 at 6:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't get infinity for the double conversion, but for the float conversion.
There you get Infinity and no exception and then your code returns before you get to the double conversion.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm glad this boiled down to operator error. I thought it a bit odd for double to really be System.Single –  Thick_propheT Jul 1 '12 at 5:50

It happens when you run a conversion on your number with the Single Type which has a max value of 3.40282347E+38 and the value of nunber is 1.2676506002282294E+230 so you are exceeding the Single Value Type. Once you make it to the Double Type it will have 1.2676506002282294E+230 in value.

From above link:

If the magnitude of the result of a floating-point operation is too large for the destination format, the result of the operation is PositiveInfinity or NegativeInfinity, as appropriate for the sign of the result.

share|improve this answer

Overflow conditions cause Infinity; You can check for this with either of these:

The float conversion is causing you to exceed the limitations of your data type.

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