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I'm trying to find a workaround for static variables not being copied over to extending classes (which doesn't play nicely with late static binding), here is what I thought might work, but gives me a "PHP Fatal error: Can't use function return value in write context" :

<?php

class Person
{
    protected static $tlsb_names = ['name'];
    protected static $tlsb_vars  = [];

    public static function & __callStatic($method,$args)
    {
        echo "call static " . $method . " on " . get_called_class() . "\n";
        if(in_array($method,static::$tlsb_names))
        {
            if(!array_key_exists(get_called_class(),static::$tlsb_vars))
            {
                static::$tlsb_vars[get_called_class()] = [];
            }
            if(!array_key_exists($method, static::$tlsb_vars[get_called_class()]))
            {
                echo "set var $method for " . get_called_class() . "\n";
                static::$tlsb_vars[get_called_class()] = null;
            }
            return static::$tlsb_vars[get_called_class()][$method];
        }
    }

    public static function show_name()
    {
        static::name() . "\n";
    }

    public static function call_me_al()
    {
        static::name() = "Al";
    }

    public static function call_me_joe()
    {
        static::name() = "Joe";
    }   
}

class Al extends Person{}
class Joe extends Person{}

Al::call_me_al();
Joe::call_me_joe();

Al::show_name();
Joe::show_name();

The problematic part is with the lines :

public static function call_me_al()
{
    static::name() = "Al";
}

Apparently this is a compile-time error since non of my echo's are run.

What am I doing wrong here?

share|improve this question
    
= []; is not valid in PHP afaik? –  Wrikken Jul 1 '12 at 9:01
2  
Yes it is, starting with PHP 5.4 I think, isn't it great? :) –  djfm Jul 1 '12 at 9:03
    
I have one thing to say about that: "Whooohoooo! Upgrade time!" ... Does it work btw if you make it 2 statements ($name = self::name();$name = 'Al':?) –  Wrikken Jul 1 '12 at 9:06
    
The assignment works, but $name = 'Al' doesn't set the value in the static array. –  djfm Jul 1 '12 at 9:21
    
Hm, it does seem to be a limitation of __callStatic, debug_zval_dump shows a refcount of 1 with __callStatic, but a refcount of 2 when I define a name() static method... –  Wrikken Jul 1 '12 at 9:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The following line of code is wrong:

public static function & __callStatic($method,$args)

You need to match the definition of that __callStatic functionDocs and that is without return by reference:

public static function __callStatic($name, $arguments)

So what you try to achieve is not possible.

And the other problem you circle around with should be able to solve with late static binding (LSB)Docs.

Also keep in mind that Magic is hard to debug, so get your step-debugger ready and step through the application so you can better understand what is actually happen. The debugger in PHP is called Xdebug, most PHP IDEs and editors support it.

share|improve this answer
    
LSB won't solve it : what I want is for my child classes to have their own copies of the static variable name. If I want to do this with LSB I will have to manually redeclare static $name in Al and Joe when defining the class. This is ok for a few variable but a pain when there are a lot : you forget a static declaration and all of the sudden all your child classes share the same static member instead of their own... –  djfm Jul 1 '12 at 14:54
    
oh wow, so you complain that class oriented programming is limited? well, why don't you drop the static and just do what you want to do? it looks awfully complicated what you're heading for (btw, create your own "__callStatic" function that does what you want and just call it. like Class::func('name'); - you can even return by reference then. –  hakre Jul 1 '12 at 15:04
    
yeah ok I can, and will have to, drop the magic methods. It will be cleaner allright albeit a bit less practical... but what's the point of using PHP if you want to write clean code ? :) –  djfm Jul 1 '12 at 16:09
    
for more info on what I was trying to work around : bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=49105 . I agree I have to match the definition of the __callStatic function but it is not so obvious as & __callStatic is not rejected by the compiler and works as intended... except when actually returning the reference –  djfm Jul 1 '12 at 16:16
    
Like with any other language: Avoid static, global and (global) static state. Get's your code clean. Also Magic or not. Depends a bit, but I'm more in the explicit than the magic camp. For your case you're perhaps looking for things like ArrayAccess. If you want to have things dynamic but somehow defined as well. –  hakre Jul 1 '12 at 16:16

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