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I am trying to run the for loop in a separate thread so that the UI should be responsive and the progress bar is visible.

The problem is that I don't know how to do that :). In this code, the process starts in a separate thread, but the next part of the code is executed at the same time. The messageBox is displayed and the results are never returned (e.g. the listbox's selected index property is never set).

It doesn't work even if I use, "taskEx.delay()".

            TaskEx.Run(() =>
                {
                    for (int i = 0; i < sResults.Count(); i++)
                    {

                        if (sResults.ElementAt(i).DisplayIndexForSearchListBox.Trim().Contains(ayaStr))
                        {
                            lstGoto.SelectedIndex = i;
                            lstGoto_SelectionChanged(lstReadingSearchResults, null);
                            IsIndexMatched = true;
                            break;
                        }
                    }
                });

        //TaskEx.delay(1000);
        if (IsIndexMatched == true)
            stkPanelGoto.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
        else //the index didn't match
        {
            MessagePrompt.ShowMessage("The test'" + ayaStr + "' does not exist.", "Warning!");
        }

Could anyone please tell me how can I use multi-threading with a "for" or "foreach" loop?

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You should answer first on the following question: when your separate thread do calculations, what the main UI thread should do? You can take sample with async/await mentioned by Daniel, but anyway you should understand that UI thread should process windows messages in order to be responsive. Also, about "lstGoto.SelectedIndex=i" in your example, infact most properties of UI controls cannot be changed from another thread, you should use Invoke method. It would be better if you read some articles about multithreading with windows UI, so you would better understand the overall picture. –  Alexey F Jul 1 '12 at 9:32
    
As it can be seen that this question has two answers, both are working. With all due respect, May I ask that which one is more efficient and recommended? - thanks :) –  wafers Jul 1 '12 at 10:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

TaskEx - are you using the async targeting pack for .NET 4.0? In that case, use await TaskEx.Run(...) - C# 5.0 await will wait until the task is completed, but will keep the UI responsive while it is waiting (unlike the .Wait() method).

Also, you need to move the lstGoto.SelectedIndex = i; assignment out of the background thread - accessing UI controls is only allowed on the main thread.

    int index = await TaskEx.Run(() =>
            {
                // ensure that sResults is a List<T> - call .ToList() if necessary
                for (int i = 0; i < sResults.Count; i++)
                {

                    if (sResults[i].DisplayIndexForSearchListBox.Trim().Contains(ayaStr))
                    {
                        return i;
                    }
                }
                return -1; // nothing found
            });

    //await TaskEx.Delay(1000);
    if (index >= 0)
    {
        stkPanelGoto.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
        lstGoto.SelectedIndex = i;
        lstGoto_SelectionChanged(lstReadingSearchResults, null);
    }
    else //the index didn't match
    {
        MessagePrompt.ShowMessage("The test'" + ayaStr + "' does not exist.", "Warning!");
    }

A last word of warning: do not use Count()/ElementAt() repeatedly in a loop - those LINQ methods might end up traversing the whole collection to compute their result. If you need to traverse an IEnumerable by index, it's much faster to convert it into a List once and then traverse through the list.

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Thank you Daniel, your answer is correct. In response to the comment about IEnumerable (or LINQ methods), I converted that I enumerable into a List, and it gives an error:InvalidCastException... and the time period to search through 285 records is "very" long. I did this, replaces IEnumerable with a List as List< dictSearchResults> sResults = (List< dictSearchResults>) lstGoto.DataContext; Is there any example of casting IEnumerable into a List, if you know. Thanks –  wafers Jul 1 '12 at 10:48
    
I got the answer to my question, I have asked in the comment above. stackoverflow.com/questions/31708/… –  wafers Jul 1 '12 at 10:54

You need to use Task.Wait()

Try this:

TaskEx.Wait();
if (IsIndexMatched == true)
    stkPanelGoto.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;

If you want to restrict the waiting time you can give Wait() time parameter or TimeSpan, For example:

TaskEx.Wait(10000)

You can also use it with CancellationToken,
Or combination of both CancellationToken and time limit

Read about all option on MSDN:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd235635.aspx

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Thank you Dor. There's no "wait()" method with either Task or TaskEx. And the link above is invalid as the page doesn't exist :) –  wafers Jul 1 '12 at 10:17
    
@saafh I fixed the link, look at it –  Dor Cohen Jul 1 '12 at 10:24

The code after the fix is applied.

int index = -1;
IEnumerable<dictSearchResults> sResults = (IEnumerable<dictSearchResults>)lstGoto.DataContext;
//Makin a list of all the DisplayIndex from the IEnumerable object
var lstGotoResults= sResults.Select(rec => rec.DisplayIndexForSearchListBox.ToString()).ToList();

index = await TaskEx.Run(() =>
{
    return lstGotoResults.IndexOf(ayaIndexStr);
});


if (index >= 0)
{ 
    lstGoto.SelectedIndex = index ;
    lstGoto_SelectionChanged(lstReadingSearchResults, null);
    stkPanelGoto.Visibility = Visibility.Collapsed;
}

After converting IEnumerable into a List, the code is so efficient that I doubt should I use the TaskEx. There's no time for the progress bar to be visible :)

Thank you Daniel for the tip!

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