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I am trying to write a tcl script in which I need to insert some lines of code after finding a regular expression . For instance , I need to insert more #define lines of codes after finding the last occurrence of #define in the present file.

Thanks !

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I'm a little unclear what you are asking. Are you seeking a strategy to write such a script or is there some specific Tcl construct that is causing a problem? You mention "finding a regular expression" in the first sentence and "finding the last occurrence" in the second. Those are quite different things. –  andy mango Jul 1 '12 at 16:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When making edits to a text file, you read it in and operate on it in memory. Since you're dealing with lines of code in that text file, we want to represent the file's contents as a list of strings (each of which is the contents of a line). That then lets us use lsearch (with the -regexp option) to find the insertion location (which we'll do on the reversed list so we find the last instead of the first location) and we can do the insertion with linsert.

Overall, we get code a bit like this:

# Read lines of file (name in “filename” variable) into variable “lines”
set f [open $filename "r"]
set lines [split [read $f] "\n"]
close $f

# Find the insertion index in the reversed list
set idx [lsearch -regexp [lreverse $lines] "^#define "]
if {$idx < 0} {
    error "did not find insertion point in $filename"
}

# Insert the lines (I'm assuming they're listed in the variable “linesToInsert”)
set lines [linsert $lines end-$idx {*}$linesToInsert]

# Write the lines back to the file
set f [open $filename "w"]
puts $f [join $lines "\n"]
close $f

Prior to Tcl 8.5, the style changes a little:

# Read lines of file (name in “filename” variable) into variable “lines”
set f [open $filename "r"]
set lines [split [read $f] "\n"]
close $f

# Find the insertion index in the reversed list
set indices [lsearch -all -regexp $lines "^#define "]
if {![llength $indices]} {
    error "did not find insertion point in $filename"
}
set idx [expr {[lindex $indices end] + 1}]

# Insert the lines (I'm assuming they're listed in the variable “linesToInsert”)
set lines [eval [linsert $linesToInsert 0 linsert $lines $idx]]
### ALTERNATIVE
# set lines [eval [list linsert $lines $idx] $linesToInsert]

# Write the lines back to the file
set f [open $filename "w"]
puts $f [join $lines "\n"]
close $f

The searching for all the indices (and adding one to the last one) is reasonable enough, but the contortions for the insertion are pretty ugly. (Pre-8.4? Upgrade.)

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1  
when reading the contents of a file with split [read $f] \n you should use read's -nonewline option to avoid an extraneous trailing blank element in the list. –  glenn jackman Jul 1 '12 at 20:42
    
@glenn Or write back out with puts -nonewline $f [join $lines \n] –  Donal Fellows Jul 2 '12 at 0:06

Not exactly the answer to your question, but this is the type of task that lends towards shell scripting (even if my solution is a bit ugly).

tac inputfile | sed -n '/#define/,$p' | tac
echo "$yourlines"
tac inputfile | sed '/#define/Q' | tac

should work!

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The question did ask for a Tcl script, which that isn't… –  Donal Fellows Jul 1 '12 at 12:50
    
That's what I wrote so others would read, which you didn't. –  Jo So Jul 1 '12 at 12:58
    
Hello, Thanks for replying , but this method did not work . Can u plz suggest me how can I insert some code after getting the line no. after which I need to insert the code. lets say last #define occur at line no. 100 dn how can I insert code at 101 using TCL only. –  user1468315 Jul 1 '12 at 13:39
    
The question asked for Tcl both explicitly and by tag. Your response could have been OK if you had tailored it to running from Tcl (via it's exec command) but you didn't. –  Donal Fellows Jul 1 '12 at 17:35
    
Ok, thank you for getting it right from a jurisdictional standpoint... I'm still glad to have given a much simpler alternative to the Tcl answers. –  Jo So Jul 1 '12 at 22:01
set filename content.txt
set fh [open $filename r]
set lines [read $fh]
close $fh


set line_con [split $lines "\n"]
set line_num {} 
set i 0
foreach line $line_con {
    if [regexp {^#define} $line] {
        lappend line_num $i
        incr i
    }
}

if {[llength $line_num ] > 0 } {
    linsert $line_con [lindex $line_num end] $line_insert
} else {
    puts "no insert point"
}


set filename content_new.txt
set fh [open $filename w]
puts $fh file_con
close $fh
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