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int[] integers = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 };

What is the difference between this :

var odd = from i in integers
          where i % 2 == 1
          select i;

and this :

var ODD = integers.Where(i => i % 2 == 1);

if there is no difference and just the faces are different, so why should it be possible at all? I mean what is the need of having two ways of doing it?

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There is no difference, only looks. –  MatthewRz Jul 1 '12 at 11:12
1  
I've just noticed the the case of ODD changes. How odd! –  Preet Sangha Jul 1 '12 at 11:24
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Nothing - the first is syntactic sugar for the second.

I use what ever makes the intention clear. Sometimes terseness is fine, sometimes the flow of the fluent methods, and at other times a query to express what I'm doing.

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Yep and I prefer the second by a mile! –  Charleh Jul 1 '12 at 11:18
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There is no difference, it's just different syntax. Take a look at the LINQ docs

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The compiler specification requires that LINQ queries be translated into extension method calls before being compiled.

The LINQ queries are generally more readable that the extension method calls. That's all there is to it.

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1  
I'd argue the opposite. Being fluent in SQL makes learning Linq comprehension syntax a real PITA, because they're similar but also substantially different. Unless I'm doing joins, I far prefer the extension methods. –  spender Jul 1 '12 at 13:58
    
@spender - One man's trash is another man's treasure. :-) –  Enigmativity Jul 2 '12 at 1:03
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Indeed, you are talking about the difference between query expression and method chain.....There is no any difference in performance wise

For more info, check out this post

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Yes there is a small difference between both the statements

1)

var odd = from i in integers           
where i % 2 == 1           
select i;

This statement is LINQ statement and are more readable than the second statement given written below. Query defines a set of rules that are actually executed only at the time of foreach loop execution.This is called deferred execution.

2)

var ODD = integers.Where(i => i % 2 == 1); 

While the second statement will do the same thing but the difference is it is a Query method.These query method are defined by System.Linq.Enumerable and are implemented as extension method. If we are using query method then the query must be executed at the time of calling that method to obtain the result.This is called immediate execution.

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1  
Sorry to say that's absolutely false (that's why your answer was downvoted). The first statement is just another way of writing the second statement. More : the first statement is converted by the C# compiler into the second one ! It's exactly the same thing (and thus of course, both are deferred execution). –  Ssithra Jul 1 '12 at 14:38
    
@Nimish - Sorry my friend. You're wrong. Both are equivalent and both are deferred. –  Enigmativity Jul 2 '12 at 1:02
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