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  1. (define self-add
    (let ((x 0))
      (lambda ()
        (set! x (+ x 1))
        x)))
    

(self-add) => 1

(self-add) => 2

(self-add) => 3

(self-add) => 4

    2.
 (define self-add1
    (lambda ()
      (let ((x 0))
        (set! x (+ x 1))
        x)))

(self-add1) => 1

(self-add1) => 1

(self-add1) => 1

Please tell me how to understand the difference between the above two functions? Thanks a lot in advance! Best regards.

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1  
Have you tried using those functions to see what they do?? –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Jul 1 '12 at 14:44
    
how to do it? thanks –  abelard20008 Jul 1 '12 at 15:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The first function defines a local variable x with an initial value of 0 and afterwards binds a lambda special form to the name self-add - so x is "enclosed" by the lambda (that's why we say that the lambda from behaves as a closure) and will be the same for all invocations of self-add (you could say that x is "remembered" by self-add), and each time it gets called the value of x will be incremented by one.

The second function binds the lambda to the procedure and afterwards defines a local variable x inside the lambda - here x is redefined each time self-add1 gets called, and will be different for all invocations: so x is never "remembered" by self-add1 and is created anew every time the procedure gets called, initialized with 0 and then incremented, always returning the value 1.

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Thank you for your detailed explanation! –  abelard20008 Jul 1 '12 at 15:58
    
@abelard20008 My pleasure! welcome to Stack Overflow, please remember to accept the answer that was most helpful for you, by clicking on the check mark to its left. –  Óscar López Jul 1 '12 at 16:00
    
can I think that x in second function is a local variable? thanks –  abelard20008 Jul 1 '12 at 16:24
    
@abelard20008 absolutely, that's what it is: a variable local to each invocation of the function, whereas in the first function x is shared by all invocations of the function –  Óscar López Jul 1 '12 at 16:28

The first function is closure. You create x variable in the lexical scope of the function and the variable holds its value between calls.

Additional information:

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where to get the knowledge about Scheme's closure, I didn't find anything about in book "The Scheme programming language 4th edition",Thanks ! –  abelard20008 Jul 1 '12 at 15:36

First function is a closure, while second function simply returns the same function every time, which makes x = 0 and then adds one and returns the result.

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where to get the knowledge about Scheme's closure, I didn't find anything about in book "The Scheme programming language 4th edition",Thanks ! –  abelard20008 Jul 1 '12 at 15:29
    
I recommend that you read SICP. It's free and a very good Computer Science book that happens to be using Scheme. It covers usage of closures as well. Good luck. –  Mateusz Kowalczyk Jul 1 '12 at 17:31

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