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For any arbitrary instance (collections of different objects, compositions, single objects, etc)

How can I determine its size in bytes?

(I've currently got a collection of various objects and i'm trying to determine the aggregated size of it)

EDIT: Has someone written an extension method for Object that could do this? That'd be pretty neat imo.

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1  
I'm sure I've seen almost exactly this question before on SO... can't seem to find it though. –  Noldorin Jul 14 '09 at 22:06
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I tried looking around as well before posting, but nothing really came up. –  Janie Jul 14 '09 at 22:07
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How to get object size in memory? –  Sjoerd Jul 17 '12 at 13:33
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possible duplicate of Getting the size of a field in bytes with C# –  AxelEckenberger Jan 11 '13 at 22:27

10 Answers 10

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Janie, I'd really stay away from trying to automate this, at least right away.

Let some human learn what the problem is and learn how to track it down. First of all, you might find that you actually solve the problem so that there's no need for future profiling. Even if the problem recurs, a human should learn the nature of the recurrences: how they differ one from the other.

That will give you a rational basis for automation.

Among other things, you may learn that you only need automation to assist the human in her analysis: a fully-automated system may not be necessary.


This does remind me a bit of the time I was told to go find and fix a memory leak that was crashing IIS. Since I was told to find one, I found one. We were spending incredible amounts of memory on System.String instances, all of which were inside of StringBuilder instances. I even implemented an ObjectPool class, based on an MSDN article.

IIS still crashed.

It later turned out there had been no memory leak. Instead, there was a piece of unmanaged code that was not thread safe, and didn't like being called inside a web service.

You have to be careful to solve the right problem, or at least you have to be careful about how much time you spend solving the wrong problem.

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Answered (useful, pragmatic response) –  Janie Jul 20 '09 at 18:51
    
Thanks for the kind words. –  John Saunders Jul 20 '09 at 19:04
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this doesn't answer the problem, im trying to write a generics based serialiser and I want to know the byte[] footprint so that I can declare an array of the right size. There is no "human" problem in my scenario. –  Wardy Aug 24 '13 at 10:19
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How could you even accept this as an answer? –  folex Sep 3 '13 at 7:07
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Believe me, four years ago, this was hot stuff. –  John Saunders Sep 3 '13 at 9:28

First of all, a warning: that follows is strictly in the realm of ugly undocumented hacks. Do not rely on this working - even if it works for you now, it may stop working tomorrow, with any minor or major .NET update.

You can use the information in this article on CLR internals - last I checked, it was still applicable. Here's how this is done (it retrieves the internal "Basic Instance Size" field via TypeHandle of the type).

object obj = new List<int>(); // whatever you want to get the size of
RuntimeTypeHandle th = obj.GetType().TypeHandle;
int size = *(*(int**)&th + 1);
Console.WriteLine(size);

This works on 3.5 SP1 32-bit. I'm not sure if field sizes are the same on 64-bit - you might have to adjust the types and/or offsets if they are not.

This will work for all "normal" types, for which all instances have the same, well-defined types. Those for which this isn't true are arrays and strings for sure, and I believe also StringBuilder. For them you'll have add the size of all contained elements to their base instance size.

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can we do this without using pointers? –  sandhya Mar 18 '10 at 6:49
    
No. There's no "proper" way to do this, because it is not something a well-behaved .NET application should be concerned of in the first place. The above mucks directly with internal data structures of a particular implementation of CLR (which may easily change in next version of .NET, for example). –  Pavel Minaev Mar 18 '10 at 18:46
    
is this supposed to work in C# or only managed c++? it's not happy in C# so far that I've tried it: Cannot take the address of, get the size of, or declare a pointer to a managed type ('System.RuntimeTypeHandle') –  Maslow Apr 3 at 17:19
    
The code is C#, but it looks like something has changed since I last wrote it - it compiled fine with C# 3 and .NET 3.5. You can probably still use unions (LayoutKind.Explicit) to "cast" the handle to a pointer and do arithmetic on it. –  Pavel Minaev Apr 22 at 9:18

You may be able to approximate the size by pretending to serializing it with a binary serializer (but routing the output to oblivion) if you're working with serializable objects.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        A parent;
        parent = new A(1, "Mike");
        parent.AddChild("Greg");
        parent.AddChild("Peter");
        parent.AddChild("Bobby");

        System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter bf =
           new System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary.BinaryFormatter();
        SerializationSizer ss = new SerializationSizer();
        bf.Serialize(ss, parent);
        Console.WriteLine("Size of serialized object is {0}", ss.Length);
    }
}

[Serializable()]
class A
{
    int id;
    string name;
    List<B> children;
    public A(int id, string name)
    {
        this.id = id;
        this.name = name;
        children = new List<B>();
    }

    public B AddChild(string name)
    {
        B newItem = new B(this, name);
        children.Add(newItem);
        return newItem;
    }
}

[Serializable()]
class B
{
    A parent;
    string name;
    public B(A parent, string name)
    {
        this.parent = parent;
        this.name = name;
    }
}

class SerializationSizer : System.IO.Stream
{
    private int totalSize;
    public override void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
        this.totalSize += count;
    }

    public override bool CanRead
    {
        get { return false; }
    }

    public override bool CanSeek
    {
        get { return false; }
    }

    public override bool CanWrite
    {
        get { return true; }
    }

    public override void Flush()
    {
        // Nothing to do
    }

    public override long Length
    {
        get { return totalSize; }
    }

    public override long Position
    {
        get
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
        set
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }

    public override int Read(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override long Seek(long offset, System.IO.SeekOrigin origin)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override void SetLength(long value)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}
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1  
Of course, this can get you a minimum size, but tells you nothing about the size in memory. –  John Saunders Jul 14 '09 at 23:04
    
Lol, the next lightbulb I had before coming back to check the replies was using the binary serializer. John, how would this not give you the actual size in memory? –  Janie Jul 14 '09 at 23:17
    
It would give you the serialized size, which will be the size the serializer wanted it, for "serializer" purposes. Those are likely different from the "sit-in-memory" purposes. Maybe serializer stores smaller integers in three bytes, for instance. –  John Saunders Jul 14 '09 at 23:34
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Like I said, it's only an approximation. It's not perfect, but I would disagree that it tells you "nothing" about the size in memory. I would say that it given you some idea -- larger serializations would generally be correlated with larger in-memory sizes. There is some relationship. –  BlueMonkMN Jul 15 '09 at 10:46
    
I agree - it's useful to get a ballpark estimate of the size of a .NET object graph. –  Craig Shearer Jan 8 '11 at 21:25

AFAIK, you cannot, without actually deep-counting the size of each member in bytes. But again, does the size of a member (like elements inside a collection) count towards the size of the object, or a pointer to that member count towards the size of the object? Depends on how you define it.

I have run into this situation before where I wanted to limit the objects in my cache based on the memory they consumed.

Well, if there is some trick to do that, I'd be delighted to know about it!

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This doesn't apply to the current .NET implementation, but one thing to keep in mind with garbage collected/managed runtimes is the allocated size of an object can change throughout the lifetime of the program. For example, some generational garbage collectors (such as the Generational/Ulterior Reference Counting Hybrid collector) only need to store certain information after an object is moved from the nursery to the mature space.

This makes it impossible to create a reliable, generic API to expose the object size.

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Interesting. So what do people do to dynamically determine the size of their objects/collections of objects? –  Janie Jul 14 '09 at 22:42
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It depends on what they need it for. If for P/Invoke (native code interop), they use Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(T)). If for memory profiling, they use a separate profiler that cooperates with the execution environment to provide the information. If you are interested in the element alignment in an array, you can use the SizeOf IL opcode in a DynamicMethod (I don't think there's an easier way in the .NET framework for this). –  Sam Harwell Jul 14 '09 at 23:04

This is impossible to do at runtime.

There are various memory profilers that display object size, though.

EDIT: You could write a second program that profiles the first one using the CLR Profiling API and communicates with it through remoting or something.

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If it's impossible to do at runtime, how are the memory profilers providing the information? –  Janie Jul 14 '09 at 22:13
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By using the Profiling API. However, a program cannot profile itself –  SLaks Jul 14 '09 at 22:18
    
Interesting. What if I wanted to have the code deal with cases when objects were consuming too much memory? –  Janie Jul 14 '09 at 22:26
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Then you'd be dealing with self-aware software, and I'd be very afraid. :-) Seriously, "single responsibility principal" - let the program be the program, let some other piece of code watch for objects taking up too much memory. –  John Saunders Jul 14 '09 at 22:41
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@Janie: you would also be making assumptions about the significance of the size and how it relates to performance. I think you'd want to be a real low-level CLR performance expert (the kind who already knows about the Profiling API) before you do that. Otherwise, you might be applying your earlier experiences to a situation in which they do not apply. –  John Saunders Jul 14 '09 at 23:06

You can use reflection to gather all the public member or property information (given the object's type). There is no way to determine the size without walking through each individual piece of data on the object, though.

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For value types, you can use Marshal.SizeOf. Of course, it returns the number of bytes required to marshal the structure in unmanaged memory, which is not necessarily what the CLR uses.

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Although is not really the same...

this answer by Jon Skeet basically covers WHY you can't do it...

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Use Son Of Strike which has a command ObjSize.

Note that actual memory consumed is always larger than ObjSize reports due to a synkblk which resides directly before the object data.

Read more about both here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163791.aspx

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