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Consider a C# GUI application which uses a FileStream to read a file, chosen by the user through an "Open File" dialog.

In case the read fails with one of the exceptions, what is the correct way to report the failure to the user, in an user-friendly manner?

Should I invent my own message for each of those exceptions, or is there a way of obtaining a localized, user-friendly message that I could present verbatim to the user?

Edit

I'm asking whether .NET itself is able to provide me with a descriptive string that I can present (and which would be consistent with other .NET programs). I know that I can roll up my own, but I'd like to avoid that if there's a standard alternative.

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What kind of an application are we talking about? Is this a web site, mobile, desktop or maybe a library? How much details are you willing to expose to the user? –  oleksii Jul 1 '12 at 16:14
    
A C# desktop application with a GUI in WPF. I'm willing to expose enough information for a non-technical user to understand what's wrong and what they need to do. –  Kos Jul 1 '12 at 16:18

3 Answers 3

You can have a set of localizable user exceptions with one of them being say FileUploadError. You can put a localized general information there. Throwing a few technical details might be a bit challenging, as it can be quite hard to get the right balance between technical details and a simple step that a user needs to take to fix an error.

My suggestion would be:

  1. Have one user level FileUploadErrorException
  2. Have a details property in it
  3. Depending on the actual exception, suggest a user to try a few things
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If you are catching an exception thrown by one of the .Net framework's File classes, then it is likely that the contents of the exception's .Message property will already be localized. The .Message property is supposed to contain localized, human readable text. How 'friendly' it is depends, I guess, but it might contain something you can embed within a more general and friendly paragraph.

Assuming you might write some method AlertUserWithMessage() to display the error to the user, this might be useful:

try
{
    fileStream.Read(...);  // or some other operation
}
catch(Exception e)
{
    AlertUserWithMessage(e.Message);
}

If you want to include additional information that might be helpful to a support person diagnosing the problem, then you can also get the stack trace as a string from the exception.

try
{
    fileStream.Read(...);  // or some other operation
}
catch(Exception e)
{
    AlertUserWithMessageAndStackTrace(e.Message, e.StackTrace);
}
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Exception messages are by nature technical and describe what went wrong (at implementation level), as opposed to how to solve an end user's problem. On the other hand the intent of an error message presented to the user is to explain what failed and what action to take to remedy the problem. Exceptions messages and end-user error messages don't have the same purpose and aren't written for the same audience.

So for decent user experience, it is much better to map these exceptions to localized user-friendly advice on how to get around the problem. Sure, for technical users it could be nice to have some diagnostic feature that could give details of the exception (in which case having exception messages in English doesn't matter that much--English is really the world's technical language), or just point them to a log with all the details. But just throwing an exception message, even localized, at an end user is likely to baffle them.

For this reason I don't think localizing exception messages is much use. It's true that the .NET framework has localized exception messages for major languages, but I think that's more because there are developers who use these languages as their base language and do not necessarily have a good command of English. So the audience of these localized exception messages is still developers, not end users of a software product built in .NET.

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