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I bought a server and I need to check it's internet connection (speed).

Is there an easy way to do that?

I googled but I couldn't find anything...

I did this:

<?php

$link = 'http://speed.bezeqint.net/big.zip';
$start = time();
$size = filesize($link);
$file = file_get_contents($link);
$end = time();

$time = $end - $start;

$speed = $size / $time;

echo "Server's speed is: $speed MB/s";


?>

Is it correct?

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closed as off topic by Gumbo, PeeHaa, rdlowrey, tereško, Maerlyn Jul 1 '12 at 16:57

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For download speed this comes to my mind: Install a bittorrent command line client and download a linux distribution (not too new, but not too old, so that there are a lot of seeds). Usually all these seeds can send as fast as your server goes. –  Aufziehvogel Jul 1 '12 at 16:39
    
Looks fine to me. Does it work? –  PeeHaa Jul 1 '12 at 16:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try:

<?php

$link = 'http://speed.bezeqint.net/big.zip';
$start = time();
$size = filesize($link);
$file = file_get_contents($link);
$end = time();

$time = $end - $start;

$size = $size / 1048576;

$speed = $size / $time;

echo "Server's speed is: $speed MB/s";


?>
share|improve this answer
    
i did this: <?php $link = 'speed.bezeqint.net/big.zip';; $start = time(); $size = filesize($link); $file = file_get_contents($link); $end = time(); $time = $end - $start; $speed = $size / $time; echo "Server's speed is: $speed MB/s"; ?> Is it correct? –  Ariel Aharonson Jul 1 '12 at 16:46
    
Nearly, it will output bytes per second, not MB/s –  Maxorq Jul 1 '12 at 16:48

If you have the remote desktop, then install a web browser and go to speedtest.net and test a speed.

If not, here's how you can test your server's download speed:

  • log in as root
  • type wget http://cachefly.cachefly.net/100mb.test
  • you'll see something like 100%[======================================>] 104,857,600 10.7M/s - 10.7M/s is a download speed.

If you have more than 1 server, you can test upload speed by transfering files between 2 servers.

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Have it connect to a server you know runs fast (such as Google). Then, measure how long it takes from sending the first packet to receiving the first packet - that's your upload time. The time from receiving the first to last packets is the download time. Then divide by the amount of data transferred and there's your result.

Example:

$times = Array(microtime(true));
$f = fsockopen("google.com",80);
$times[] = microtime(true);
$data = "POST / HTTP/1.0\r\n"
       ."Host: google.com\r\n"
       ."\r\n"
       .str_repeat("a",1000000); // send one megabyte of data
$sent = strlen($data);
fputs($f,$data);
$firstpacket = true;
$return = 0;
while(!feof($f)) {
    $return += strlen(fgets($f));
    if( $firstpacket) {
        $firstpacket = false;
        $times[] = microtime(true);
    }
}
$times[] = microtime(true);
fclose($f);
echo "RESULTS:\n"
    ."Connection: ".(($times[1]-$times[0])*1000)."ms\n"
    ."Upload: ".number_format($sent)." bytes in ".(($times[2]-$times[1]))."s (".($sent/($times[2]-$times[1])/1024)."kb/s)\n"
    ."Download: ".number_format($return)." bytes in ".(($times[3]-$times[2]))."s (".($return/($times[3]-$times[2])/1024)."kb/s)\n";

(You will get an error message from Google's servers, on account of the Content-Length header missing)

Run it a few times, get an average, but don't run it too much because I don't think Google would like it too much.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but the results I'm getting doesn't really make sense... When I download a file from my server it's at 600kb/s and I have a 100MB/s internet connection... Using your code I got this: RESULTS: Connection: 75.366973877ms Upload: 1,000,037 bytes in 0.192752122879s (5066.60377186kb/s) Download: 1,081 bytes in 2.69412994385E-5s (39183.8584071kb/s) –  Ariel Aharonson Jul 1 '12 at 17:19
    
When you download a file from your server, your network is the bottleneck. Servers usually have a much better internet connection, which is why the test connects to another server. –  Niet the Dark Absol Jul 1 '12 at 20:33
    
Yes, and I usually download at 12 MB/s (From torrent and stuff) but from my server, only at like 600 KB/s –  Ariel Aharonson Jul 2 '12 at 12:41

For the download, you can create a script that will calculate the average download speed:

$start = time(true);

$fileSize = '10240'; // if the file's size is 10MB

for ($i=0; $i<10; $i++) {
    file_get_contents('the_url_of_a_pretty_big_file');
}

$end = time(true);

$speed = ($fileSize / ($end - $start)) / $i * 8;

echo $speed; // will return the speed in kbps
share|improve this answer
    
First line. mictotime. Also, 100 KB = 102400 B, not 100000. –  Maxorq Jul 1 '12 at 16:51
    
IMHO microtime would be better, and more accurate. –  Maxorq Jul 1 '12 at 16:52
    
I noticed the microtime thing few seconds after posting. Thanks for pointing it out. Regarding the file size it's in my opinion not important, wouldn't make much difference in the result. –  Samy Dindane Jul 1 '12 at 16:54
    
If the file would be 100 KB, the time/microtime would make a difference though :P –  Maxorq Jul 1 '12 at 16:56
    
100KB was just an example, that's why I mentioned "the_url_of_a_pretty_big_file" in the file_get_contents(). –  Samy Dindane Jul 1 '12 at 16:58

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