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I would have expected the following C# program to only print "EOF!" once I hit "Ctrl-Z" in the console. Instead, the program finishes as soon as I hit Enter:

var textReader = Console.In;
var sb = new StringBuilder();
while(textReader.Peek() != -1)
{
    sb.Append((char)textReader.Read());
}
Console.WriteLine("Entered: '{0}'", sb);
Console.WriteLine("EOF!");

Example:

12345 <= I entered this
Entered: '12345 <= program outputs this
'
EOF!
Press any key to continue . . .

Can anyone explain the above behaviour? It's not at all what I expected.

How can I read more than 1 line of input from Console.In one character at a time?

Update: As answered below: The issue is that Peek() can't be relied on. Using Read() works though.

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Unless you take the console out of line mode, I don't believe you you will get anything via Read or Peek until the enter key is pressed. – Monroe Thomas Jul 1 '12 at 18:18
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Console.In.Read() returns -1 on EOF, So you can do this:

int c;
while((c = Console.In.Read()) != -1)
Console.Out.Write((char)c);
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Thanks yeah I'd just figured that out. My problem is that my program makes use of Peek(). Now I see I'm going to have to implement the "look ahead 1 character" logic myself. – Paul Hollingsworth Jul 1 '12 at 17:32

Hitting Ctrl-Z will produce the value 26 from Console.In.Peek(); You have to close the input stream in order to produce a -1 (happens when you close the console, hit Ctrl-C (by default), or explicitly call Console.In.Close()).

Also, by default the console streams will operate in line mode, which means that the stream won't actually be filled with characters until you hit enter. You can use 'Console.ReadKey', which blocks (see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.consolekeyinfo.key.aspx), or you can switch the console out of line mode. A C# example of this can be found here: http://ewbi.blogs.com/develops/2005/11/net_console_pre.html.

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