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The following causes a bug because file.eof() apparently doesn't return true until a read past the end of the file. How should I be doing this?

std::ifstream file("something.stuff", std::ios::in|std::ios::binary);

while(!file.eof())
{
    double x, y, z;
    file.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&x), sizeof(x));  //  Do I need to check if(file) after every read?
    file.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&y), sizeof(y));
    file.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&z), sizeof(z));

    // Do something with xyz
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can just check it after all the reads, unless you intend to do something with partial data, so:

while(true)
{
    double x, y, z;
    file.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&x), sizeof(x));
    file.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&y), sizeof(y));
    file.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&z), sizeof(z));

    if (!file)
        break;

    // Do something with xyz
}
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That's much cleaner, thanks –  Dave Jul 1 '12 at 18:37
    
Just to confirm, It doesn't cause any harm to keep reading after (!file) returns true right? –  Dave Jul 1 '12 at 18:50
    
@Dave: That is correct. No harm. read() will check if the stream is in a good state (not eof, fail or bad), if it's not, then it will set failbit. So the worst thing that's going to happen is it will do that two times more than necessary. –  Benjamin Lindley Jul 1 '12 at 18:53
    
@BenjaminLindley: To avoid two times more, you could use if( !file.read(...) ) break; for each one. Or rather they all should be in the while itself : while ( file.read(...) && file.read(...) && file.read(...) ) { do work; }. Or maybe a for, to limit the scope of the variables : for(double x,y,z; ... ; ) {}. –  Nawaz Jul 1 '12 at 19:16
    
@Nawaz: I considered all that, but I decided on this solution because it is, IMO, much more readable. Besides, with those other methods, you're also adding two additional checks for every iteration, whereas with my method, the two extra operations only happen on the last iteration, so there is a tradeoff there. Of course, we're quibbling over micro-optimizations here, my only real consideration was the readability. –  Benjamin Lindley Jul 1 '12 at 19:22

std::ifstream::read should set the eof flag once you read past the end of the file.

So, yes, you should just check file.eof() after each call to file.read().

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Alternatively, find the length of the file upfront using seek and tell, and then calculate how many iterations you should perform. That way you don't have to keep checking the eof bit after every read.

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Yes, the end of stream could be reached during each read, so you should check if each one succeeds before proceeding

std::ifstream file("something.stuff", std::ios::in|std::ios::binary); 

while(!file.eof()) 
{ 
    double x, y, z; 
    if (!file.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&x), sizeof(x)) ||
        !file.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&y), sizeof(y)) ||
        !file.read(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&z), sizeof(z)))
    {
        // failure... perhaps check file.eof() and/or file.fail() for precise condition
        break;
    }
    else 
    {
        // Do something with xyz 
    }
}
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Does it matter if you call another read after the last one flagged eof? Is there any harm done (other than an extra call)? –  Dave Jul 1 '12 at 18:41
    
No harm done. :) –  Monroe Thomas Jul 1 '12 at 18:54

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