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I'm working with the new Task Parallel Library and today went to this case:

This code doesn't compile:

    internal Task<Guid?> SavePages(string[] pages)
    {
        return Task.Run(() =>
        {
            if (pages == null || pages.Length == 0)
                return null;

            ....

Unless I explicitly returns a null nullable Guid:

    internal Task<Guid?> SavePages(string[] pages)
    {
        return Task.Run(() =>
        {
            if (pages == null || pages.Length == 0)
                return (Guid?)null;

            // Check documents path access

Why this behavior, I'm I doing something wrong? I mean, I get the code to work with the second option but don't know If I'm misusing the library, I mean, null is always null, isn't it?

Compile error:

Cannot convert lambda expression to delegate type 'System.Func' because some of the return types in the block are not implicitly convertible to the delegate return type

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd460717.aspx

share|improve this question
    
FFR, including the exact compiler error would be useful, since in this case it likely mentions something about not being able to infer the type. –  James Manning Jul 1 '12 at 19:25
    
The problem is that null is always null, so the compiler have no way of knowing which type you are representing with your null expression –  Rune FS Jul 1 '12 at 19:43
    
Side note: two other ways to express the same thing as (Guid?)null are new Guid?() and default(Guid?). –  svick Jul 2 '12 at 11:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This has to do with the way the compiler determines the type of your lambda. When you return a plain null, the only thing the compiler can imply is that you are returning an object. Hence, your parameterless lambda is compatible with Task<object>. However, the signature of your function says that you are returning Task<Guid?>, so the return type the compiler implied from your code is not compatible. When you cast that null to Guid?, you provide the compiler a the clue it is missing to make the lambda a Task<Guid?>.

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1  
The compiler should really deduce this on its own (although it's quite clear why it doesn't) –  zmbq Jul 1 '12 at 19:29
1  
@zmbq how would you determine what type null has? it's a valid value for all reference types so there's no way the compiler can determine the type of that expression (to anything other than object) –  Rune FS Jul 1 '12 at 19:42
    
@RuneFS Given that it's a nullable type then assign must work, don't you agre? –  Randolf R-F Jul 1 '12 at 19:46
1  
The type can be deduced from the type of the SavePages. –  zmbq Jul 1 '12 at 20:00
    
@zmbq That's not how type inference works in C#. Usually, the type of each expression is inferred independently (lambdas are an exception, though). –  svick Jul 2 '12 at 11:32

This is a limitation with type inference in the C# compiler. This issue is not unrelated to the one involving the ternary operator:

int? num = a != null ? a.Value : null;         // Will not compile
int? num = a != null ? a.Value : (int?)null;   // Compiles
int? num = a != null ? (int?)a.Value : null;   // Compiles

Another workaround for your specific situation is to specify the generic type explicitly:

return Task.Run<Guid?>(() =>
{
    if (pages == null || pages.Length == 0)
        return null;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Douglas for the explanation. One question: Does using the non generic version of Task.Run (as you suggest) decrease performance in any possible way? –  Randolf R-F Jul 1 '12 at 21:58
1  
unless I'm missing something, he's just talking about not making the compiler infer the type - either way you get the same generated IL AFAICT –  James Manning Jul 1 '12 at 23:08
    
@RandolfRincón-Fadul: My code still uses the generic version of Task.Run; in fact, it does so explicitly, as opposed to inferring the type (as your code does). Like James Manning said, I don’t believe there will be any difference in the generated IL, since type inference is performed at compile-time. Specifying the generic type explicitly might make compilation (not runtime) marginally faster, but this is something you’ll almost certainly never need to consider. –  Douglas Jul 2 '12 at 18:02

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