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I have a question regarding clustered index.

In clustered indices, the leaf level nodes themselves hold the data in sorted order, right?

That is, with each and every insertion/updation/deletion, the nodes are reshuffled to maintain the sorted order.

So how can the data be retrieved from it in the order they were inserted?

Imagine the following data is inserted in the order given: 1,7,4,5,2 and a clustered index is created on this field.

So the data will be stored internally in the order 1,2,4,5,7 right?

So that might facilitate faster lookup for a particular value, but what if the user wants the first 3 values in the order he inserted?

Are they somehow retrievable, or do I have to assign an incremental id for each row inserted, declare a non-clustered index on that, and provide the data for the first 3 records based on sorting the records on that id-field?

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4  
Yes, you will need to add an additional column representing either an incremental surrogate, e.g. identity INT, or alternatively some form of auto timestamping mechanism to re-trace the original insertion order. –  StuartLC Jul 1 '12 at 19:20
    
So how to choose whether to create a clustered index on the field value, or a clustered index on the id value? Is is like this that when the queries that come more often are of this type Select the 6 rows starting from the 3rd row I should choose the id as the clustered key, and when the queries like Select record where value = 45 come more often, I should set clustered index on the field value? –  Cupidvogel Jul 1 '12 at 19:30
1  
@Cupidvogel exactly –  Hogan Jul 1 '12 at 19:38
    
But I just learned that I can neither create more than 1 clustered index in one table, nor can I create both clustered and a non-clustered indices on the same table. So how can I create 2 indices (one of which should at least be clustered to facilitate fast lookup) on 2 different fields here? –  Cupidvogel Jul 1 '12 at 19:46
    
You can create numerous non clustered indexes on a table in addition to zero or one clustered index. –  Martin Smith Jul 1 '12 at 20:52

3 Answers 3

(Answers based on SQL Server - question doesn't 100% specify)

In clustered indices, the leaf level nodes themselves hold the data in sorted order, right?

That is not quite correct, the data can be stored in any order on the leaf, but the slot array on the page is in effect the order the data is read from off the page - not the physical order of the data.

That is, with each and every insertion/updation/deletion, the nodes are reshuffled to maintain the sorted order.

Nodes (e.g. pages are split and the forward / backward pointers on the double link list change), but inside a page, the slot arrays is still the entity that retains the order, rows themselves would not be shuffled to match the slot array order.

So how can the data be retrieved from it in the order they were inserted?

It's not normally guarenteed that it will be in the exact order - that tends to happen more on a heap page, where the slot array is more representative of the order, but again, not guarenteed.

Imagine the following data is inserted in the order given: 1,7,4,5,2 and a clustered index is created on this field. So the data will be stored internally in the order 1,2,4,5,7 right?

No, it will be stored 1,7,4,5,2 on the page, but the slot array would read the addresses on the page as 7,5,4,2,1 (its constructed from the end of the page backwards, so you read in reverse.)

So that might facilitate faster lookup for a particular value, but what if the user wants the first 3 values in the order he inserted?

Kind of immaterial in this case - aside from no such guarentee about ordering, SQL will read the whole page into memory. If you want to know more about SQL Internals at this kind of level, I would still recommend Kalen Delaneys SQL Internals book as one of the best sources.

If you want any information about insertion order, I suggest some kind of inserted_timestamp

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That is not quite correct, the data can be stored in any order on the leaf, but the slot array on the page is in effect the order the data is read from off the page - not the physical order of the data. - But I found at mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/1254/clustered-tables-vs-heap-tables under the Clustered Table para that Data is stored in order based on the clustered index key. Please explain which one is correct, or are they in effect the same statement. –  Cupidvogel Jul 1 '12 at 19:49
1  
They are explanations are different depths of technical detail. You can view it as a high level as being stored in an order - that pays no attention to how SQL Server physically does this - at a more detailed level you will learn about pages, slot arrays and how a clustered index maintains the order etc. –  Andrew Jul 1 '12 at 19:54
    
Please explain what is meant by storing data in array slots in one order, while being read in another order. All the books I am viewing state that in clustered index, the leaf nodes are the places where the data are stored (contrast to a non-clustered one, where they are merely pointers to the actual data pages), and they are stored in a sorted order, and the server maintains the sorted order with each updation/insertion/delete. –  Cupidvogel Jul 1 '12 at 19:59
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They are stored in a double linked list of pages, traverse that list in order, and you have your clustered index order. That says nothing about how the pages are stored on disk, or whether the data on an indiviudal page is in order, the slot array is the order within an indiviudal page. Full explanations require far more space / time than comments on a question –  Andrew Jul 1 '12 at 20:06
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Mentioned in my answer - Kalen Delaney, SQL Server Internals - considered by many to be the Internals bible. Some blogs cover this level of detail as well, read the sqlskills blogs, Paul Randal's for example : sqlskills.com/blogs/paul –  Andrew Jul 1 '12 at 20:14

Sounds like you want a timestamp on your rows to me. I typically put the following columns on all tables I create (for auditing):

timecreated
timemodified
createdby
modifiedby
deleted

These columns let you know who created the row and when, when it was last modified and by who and optionally "soft delete" the row by setting deleted to true. Of course all your other queries in the system will have to check the deleted boolean for the soft delete to work.

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The table data is sorted according to the order of the clustered index. You can only have ONE clustered index on each table ,if you like to check the first 3 values in the order he inserted ,

USE AdventureWorks

go

CREATE TABLE myTable99(
Col1 int IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY , Col2 Char(1) , Col3 datetime DEFAULT getdate()

) GO

INSERT INTO myTable99(Col2) SELECT 'A' UNION ALL SELECT 'B' UNION ALL SELECT 'C' GO

SELECT * FROM myTable99 ORDER BY 3 GO

DROP TABLE myTable99 GO

Other method could be :

CREATE TABLE CounterData]( [CounterDataID] [bigint] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL, [DateTimeID] [bigint] NOT NULL, [Value] [float] NULL ) ON [PRIMARY]

CREATE UNIQUE CLUSTERED INDEX [IX_DateTime_CounterDataID] ON [PK].[CounterData]

(

[DateTimeID] ASC,
[CounterDataID] ASC

)

WITH

(PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY] GO

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So basically what you are saying is that to store an additional piece of data (in this case, a timestamp) as surrogate, and retrieve record sequentially based on that, while randomly based on the clustered index by the server itself, right? –  Cupidvogel Jul 1 '12 at 19:57
1  
for this example yes –  user1293068 Jul 1 '12 at 20:12
    
Thanks. That was helpful... –  Cupidvogel Jul 1 '12 at 20:17

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