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Relatively new to R so apologies in advance for being clueless.

I am working with several (very large) datasets of observations at mulitple site across a country, over many year. I need to work out the proportion of the sites that have noted a specific species in week x out of the total number of sites that submitted observations in week x(essentially presence/absence data.) I have one dataset that gives details of each individual species observation, and another of the total number of observations each week. So I need some function that will count the number of sites at which the species was recorded in that week, and then to divide that by the total number of sites that recorded observations of any species within that same week. The observations are recorded with a week (1-53) and a Year(1995-2011).

Example of species.data (listed as csv for ease of pasting):

SITE_ID, SPECIES, WEEKNO, YEAR
1289, Attenb., 1, 1995
1538, Attenb., 1, 1995
1894, Attenb., 2, 1995
1286, Attenb., 4, 1995
1238, Attenb., 7, 1995
1892, Attenb., 7, 1995

And example of the total.obs.data:

YEAR, WEEKNO, TOTALOBS,
1995, 1, 100
1995, 2, 780
1995, 3, 100
1995, 4, 189
1995, 5, 382
1995, 6, 100
1995, 7, 899
1995, 8, 129

(So here I would no that in week 1 1995 the proportion was 2/100, and be able to construct either a GLM or a GAM)

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Your question is not difficult. You can probably do this very easily using a combination of reshape and some subsetting. But please provide a reproducible sample dataset to work with. For example where is the species in the second dataset? –  ECII Jul 1 '12 at 19:58
1  
also if it's a large data set the data.table package may be your friend. –  Tyler Rinker Jul 1 '12 at 20:22
    
As @TylerRinker commented, please define what you mean with "very large" data set. There are large, large and LARGE data sets. –  ECII Jul 1 '12 at 20:30

2 Answers 2

At the moment the data is too simplistic to support much complexity in testing. The xtabs function creates a matrix-object which can be divided by that week's totals:

> xtblspec <-  xtabs( ~ SPECIES+ SITE_ID +WEEKNO + YEAR  , data=dat)     
> xtblspec
, , WEEKNO = 1, YEAR = 1995

         SITE_ID
SPECIES   1238 1286 1289 1538 1892 1894
  Attenb.    0    0    1    1    0    0

, , WEEKNO = 2, YEAR = 1995

         SITE_ID
SPECIES   1238 1286 1289 1538 1892 1894
  Attenb.    0    0    0    0    0    1

, , WEEKNO = 4, YEAR = 1995

         SITE_ID
SPECIES   1238 1286 1289 1538 1892 1894
  Attenb.    0    1    0    0    0    0

, , WEEKNO = 7, YEAR = 1995

         SITE_ID
SPECIES   1238 1286 1289 1538 1892 1894
  Attenb.    1    0    0    0    1    0
#-------------

weekobs <- totobs[ match( as.numeric(dimnames(xtblspec[ 1, ,  ,])$WEEKNO ) ,totobs$WEEKNO) ,
                  "TOTALOBS"]
#[1] 100 780 189 899

To get the matrix of specific observations set up correctly so that the matrix divsions will work properly you need to have WEEKNO as the first dimension:

xtblspec <-  xtabs( ~ WEEKNO +SPECIES+ SITE_ID  + YEAR  , data=dat)
> xtblspec/weekobs
, , SITE_ID = 1238, YEAR = 1995

      SPECIES
WEEKNO     Attenb.
     1 0.000000000
     2 0.000000000
     4 0.000000000
     7 0.001112347

, , SITE_ID = 1286, YEAR = 1995

      SPECIES
WEEKNO     Attenb.
     1 0.000000000
     2 0.000000000
     4 0.005291005
     7 0.000000000

, , SITE_ID = 1289, YEAR = 1995

      SPECIES
WEEKNO     Attenb.
     1 0.010000000
     2 0.000000000
     4 0.000000000
     7 0.000000000

, , SITE_ID = 1538, YEAR = 1995

      SPECIES
WEEKNO     Attenb.
     1 0.010000000
     2 0.000000000
     4 0.000000000
     7 0.000000000

, , SITE_ID = 1892, YEAR = 1995

      SPECIES
WEEKNO     Attenb.
     1 0.000000000
     2 0.000000000
     4 0.000000000
     7 0.001112347

, , SITE_ID = 1894, YEAR = 1995

      SPECIES
WEEKNO     Attenb.
     1 0.000000000
     2 0.001282051
     4 0.000000000
     7 0.000000000
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Let me give a try, while noting all the limitations of the question already stated in the comments above

#Create the data frame with the total observations
tot.obs<-data.frame(year=rep(1995,10), weekno=1:10, obs=floor(runif(n=10,80,100)))
#Create the variable week-year
tot.obs$week.year<-paste(tot.obs$week,tot.obs$year,sep="-")

#Create the data frame species observations
species.data<-data.frame(site=factor(floor(runif(n=5,2000,3000))), week=c(1,1,2,4,7), year=rep(1995,5),observ=rep(1,5))
species.data$week.year<-paste(species.data$week,species.data$year,sep="-")
species.data$total.obs<-NA

#Match the total observations form the tot.obs data frame to the species data frame. You can probably do it much faster but here is a "quick and dirty way"

for (i in 1:dim(species.data)[1]){
  species.data$total.obs[i]<-tot.obs$obs[tot.obs$week.year==species.data$week.year[i]]  
}

#Calculates the percentage of the total observation that each center contributes
species.data$per.obs<-species.data$observ/ species.data$total.obs 

#For the presentation of the data, reshape is your friend
library(reshape)
species.data.melt<-melt(species.data,id.vars=c("site","week.year"), measure.vars="per.obs")

cast(species.data.melt,site~week.year, fun.aggregate=sum)


site     1-1995     2-1995     4-1995     7-1995
1 2436 0.00000000 0.00000000 0.01010101 0.00000000
2 2501 0.00000000 0.01123596 0.00000000 0.00000000
3 2590 0.00000000 0.00000000 0.00000000 0.01123596
4 2608 0.01030928 0.00000000 0.00000000 0.00000000
5 2942 0.01030928 0.00000000 0.00000000 0.00000000

Otherwise if you are not interested in the observations per center things are much easier:

species.data.melt2<-melt(species.data,id.vars=c("week.year"), measure.vars="observ")
species.obs.total<-data.frame(cast(species.data.melt2,week.year~value, fun.aggregate=sum))
colnames(species.obs.total)[2]<-"aggregated.total"
species.obs.total$total<-NA

for (i in 1:dim(species.obs.total)[1]){
  species.obs.total$total[i]<-tot.obs$obs[tot.obs$week.year==species.obs.total$week.year[i]]  
}

species.obs.total$perc<-species.obs.total$aggregated.total/ species.obs.total$total
species.obs.total


  week.year aggregated.total total       perc
1    1-1995                2    97 0.02061856
2    2-1995                1    89 0.01123596
3    4-1995                1    99 0.01010101
4    7-1995                1    89 0.01123596
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