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Assume, we have something like:

val x = "foo".charAt(0)

and let us further assume, we do not know the return type of the method charAt(0) (which is, of course, described in the Scala API). Is there a way, we can find out, which type the variable x has after its definition and when it is not declared explicitly?

UPDATE 1: My initial question was not precise enough: I would like to know (for debugging reasons) what type the variable has. Maybe there is some compiler option to see what type the variable get declared to by Scala's type inference ?

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1  
It would be hard to answer this question without some additional information. What do you mean by "determine the type"? To do something with it at compile-time? At run-time? Do you need the type, or is the java.lang.Class good enough? Can you use Scala 2.10? –  Travis Brown Jul 1 '12 at 19:56
    
This kind of "typeof" thing usually indicates generally crappiness of your code, you should structure your code so that polymorphism naturally takes care of this.. –  Kristopher Micinski Jul 1 '12 at 19:57
    
@TravisBrown You are right, my question is not precise enough. I would like to know (for debugging reasons) what type the variable has. Maybe there is some compiler option to see what type the variable get declared to by Scala's type inference ? –  John Threepwood Jul 1 '12 at 20:04
3  
I would just hover over it and press Ctrl in the IDE of your choice –  Luigi Plinge Jul 1 '12 at 20:08
    
@LuigiPlinge Thank you for the hint. –  John Threepwood Jul 1 '12 at 20:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Suppose you have the following in a source file named Something.scala:

object Something {
  val x = "foo".charAt(0)
}

You can use the -Xprint:typer compiler flag to see the program after the compiler's typer phase:

$ scalac -Xprint:typer Something.scala
[[syntax trees at end of typer]]// Scala source: Something.scala
package <empty> {
  final object Something extends java.lang.Object with ScalaObject {
    def this(): object Something = {
      Something.super.this();
      ()
    };
    private[this] val x: Char = "foo".charAt(0);
    <stable> <accessor> def x: Char = Something.this.x
  }
}

You could also use :type in the REPL:

scala> :type "foo".charAt(0)
Char

scala> :type "foo".charAt _
Int => Char

Your IDE may also provide a nicer way to get this information, as Luigi Plinge points out in a comment above.

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Perfect, thank you very much, this helped me a lot (both variants) ! –  John Threepwood Jul 1 '12 at 20:21

Here's an easier version of Travis first alternative:

dcs@dcs-132-CK-NF79:~/tmp$ scala -Xprint:typer -e '"foo".charAt(0)'
[[syntax trees at end of                     typer]] // scalacmd8174377981814677527.scala
package <empty> {
  object Main extends scala.AnyRef {
    def <init>(): Main.type = {
      Main.super.<init>();
      ()
    };
    def main(argv: Array[String]): Unit = {
      val args: Array[String] = argv;
      {
        final class $anon extends scala.AnyRef {
          def <init>(): anonymous class $anon = {
            $anon.super.<init>();
            ()
          };
          "foo".charAt(0)
        };
        {
          new $anon();
          ()
        }
      }
    }
  }
}
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Thank you Daniel for providing additional information. You use a Scala option, where can I read about all Scala Options ? I could only find a manual page for the Scala compiler, not for the Interpreter. –  John Threepwood Jul 1 '12 at 22:23
1  
The easiest way to see what the compiler et al support is from the command line. scala -help or scalac -help to see the "normal" options, then scalac -X to see "advanced" options and scalac -Y to see "private" options. –  Paul Butcher Jul 1 '12 at 23:18
    
@PaulButcher Thank you ! –  John Threepwood Jul 1 '12 at 23:25

Use this method for problem:

x.getClass
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