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I have 2 text files that contains words separated with newline. Each one is sorted ascending and is about 60MB each one. I need to get all words that doesn't exist in 2nd file (some kind of except operation). The number of words in 2 files are NOT necessarily equal.

I thought to do something relying on the fact that 2 files are sorted, but didn't really succeeded. I used TPL to parallel the work. I started with something but don't know how to finish, how to parallel the work.

I'll appreciate any help.

static StreamReader _streamReader1 = new StreamReader("file1.txt");
static StreamReader _streamReader2 = new StreamReader("file2.txt");
static IEnumerable<string> GetWordsFromFile1()
{
    while (!_streamReader1.EndOfStream)
    {
        yield return _streamReader1.ReadLine();
    }
}
static List<string> exceptedWords = new List<string>();
static void ExceptWords(string word)
{
     //Here I believe I should read a word from 2nd file and somehow to compare to <word>
     //   and continue reading until word < word2?
}
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var words = GetWordsFromFile1();
    Parallel.ForEach(words, ExceptWords);
}
share|improve this question
    
Why do you want to use the TPL here? This is an operation best done without it. – Jason Malinowski Jul 1 '12 at 20:50
    
you suggest to do one after one? – theateist Jul 1 '12 at 20:55
    
Regardless of the Except part of the operation, IMHO you're better off using File.ReadLines (read as enumerable) or File.ReadAllLines (read as array) instead of manually using streamreader like this. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd383503.aspx – James Manning Jul 1 '12 at 21:26
    
Not an answer to your question, but an aside. We actually did something similar by manipulating WinMerge from the command line: manual.winmerge.org/Command_line.html – dash Jul 1 '12 at 21:34
up vote 2 down vote accepted

While I wouldn't use something like this until after measuring the simple case and determining that it's not 'fast enough', here's a brain-dead (and not parallel) approach of leveraging the sorted nature. There are other/better ways of writing this, but the idea is you can start both 'streams' and then just move them forward and compare.

Ignoring the edge cases and start/end, you compare the current word from each of your 2 streams of words, and either the 'input' one is less (keep it), they match (skip it), or later (move the 'except' stream forward).

You could keep locals around for things like the current word from each 'stream' and the like, but IMHO you're better off ignoring this kind of approach and either doing linq Except or SortedSet.ExceptWith, at least until you have actual profile measurements showing you need something more complicated. :)

void Main()
{
    var input = new[] { "abc", "bcd", "xyz", "zzz", };
    var except = new[] { "abc", "xyz", };

    ExceptSortedInputs(input, except).Dump();
}

// Define other methods and classes here
public static IEnumerable<string> ExceptSortedInputs(IEnumerable<string> inputSequence, IEnumerable<string> exceptSequence)
{
    Contract.Requires<ArgumentNullException>(inputSequence != null);
    Contract.Requires<ArgumentNullException>(exceptSequence != null);

    var exceptEnumerator = exceptSequence.GetEnumerator();
    Contract.Assert(exceptEnumerator.MoveNext(), "except sequence was empty, silly");

    var inputEnumerator = inputSequence.GetEnumerator();
    while (inputEnumerator.MoveNext())
    {
        // need to move the except sequence forward to ensure it's at or later than the current input word
        while (String.Compare(inputEnumerator.Current, exceptEnumerator.Current) == 1)
        {
            if (exceptEnumerator.MoveNext() == false)
            {
                // stupid optimization - since there are no more except matches, we can just return the rest of the input
                do
                {
                    yield return inputEnumerator.Current;
                }
                while (inputEnumerator.MoveNext());
                yield break;
            }
        }

        // when we get here, we know the current 'except' word is equal to or later than the input one, so we can just check equality
        if (inputEnumerator.Current != exceptEnumerator.Current)
        {
            yield return inputEnumerator.Current;
        }
    }
}

a version that makes it look a little more like the interleaved nature of a typical merge join (and adds locals which might help clarity)

void Main()
{
    var input = new[] { "abc", "bcd", "xyz", "zzz", };
    var except = new[] { "abc", "xyz", };

    ExceptSortedInputs(input, except).Dump();
}

// Define other methods and classes here
public static IEnumerable<string> ExceptSortedInputs(IEnumerable<string> inputSequence, IEnumerable<string> exceptSequence)
{
    var exceptEnumerator = exceptSequence.GetEnumerator();
    var exceptStillHasElements = exceptEnumerator.MoveNext();

    var inputEnumerator = inputSequence.GetEnumerator();
    var inputStillHasElements = inputEnumerator.MoveNext();

    while (inputStillHasElements)
    {
        if (exceptStillHasElements == false)
        {
            // since we exhausted the except sequence, we know we can safely return any input elements
            yield return inputEnumerator.Current;
            inputStillHasElements = inputEnumerator.MoveNext();
            continue;
        }

        // need to compare to see which operation to perform
        switch (String.Compare(inputEnumerator.Current, exceptEnumerator.Current))
        {
            case -1:
                // except sequence is already later, so we can safely return this
                yield return inputEnumerator.Current;
                inputStillHasElements = inputEnumerator.MoveNext();
                break;

            case 0:
                // except sequence has a match, so we can safely skip this
                inputStillHasElements = inputEnumerator.MoveNext();
                break;

            case 1:
                // except sequence is behind - we need to move it forward
                exceptStillHasElements = exceptEnumerator.MoveNext();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your cleaned-up version of the code is missing a line in the case 0: part. It should have "inputEnumerator.MoveNext()". It was giving me an infinite loop until I fixed that in the test below. Still, good work on the fastest code here. – Xantix Jul 2 '12 at 7:49
    
@Xantix - good catch, thanks :) – James Manning Jul 2 '12 at 14:48
    
@JamesManning, it works and pretty fast. Thanks – theateist Jul 3 '12 at 8:42
    
@theateist - FWIW, I was really hoping that OrderedSet in PowerCollections would implement DifferenceWith(OrderedSet) in such a way that it leveraged them both being sorted, but no such luck (although it would need to check that they were using the same comparer, I suppose) - powercollections.codeplex.com/SourceControl/changeset/view/… – James Manning Jul 3 '12 at 19:41

IMHO, KISS wins for something like this:

var wordsFromFile1 = File.ReadAllLines("file1.txt");
var wordsFromFile2 = File.ReadAllLines("file2.txt");
var file1ExceptFile2 = wordsFromFile1.Except(wordsFromFile2);

If you want a case-insensitive comparison:

var wordsFromFile1 = File.ReadAllLines("file1.txt");
var wordsFromFile2 = File.ReadAllLines("file2.txt");
var file1ExceptFile2 = wordsFromFile1.Except(wordsFromFile2, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
share|improve this answer
    
This is not what he wants. He wants to exploit the sorted nature of the data. Except loads the first source into memory in its entirety. – usr Jul 1 '12 at 21:19
1  
@usr - IMHO, the question (and answers) are in the 'premature optimization' bucket. loading 2 files of 60MB each into memory is going to dominate the time (loading 120MB from disk) - trying to optimize the Except operation before measuring the simple case is a bad practice IMHO. :) – James Manning Jul 1 '12 at 21:23
1  
If the Except part is actually measured to be expensive, I'd probably still take first-pass optimizations that leverage the BCL - for instance, loading the first file into a SortedSet (which I'd imagine is O(n) given it's already sorted) and then doing ExceptWith on the second file (which is explicitly O(n)) - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd412089 – James Manning Jul 1 '12 at 21:40

Perhaps this doesn't directly answer your question, but I don't see an easy way of using the TPL or relying on the fact that the files are sorted. I would trust LINQ's Except method to do the heavy lifting. Since the files are not astronomically huge, loading the file into memory shouldn't be a problem.

static IEnumerable<string> GetWordsFromFile(StreamReader _streamReader)
{
    while (!_streamReader.EndOfStream)
    {
        yield return _streamReader.ReadLine();
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    using (var _streamReader1 = new StreamReader("file1.txt"))
    {
        using (var _streamReader2 = new StreamReader("file2.txt"))
        {
            var words = GetWordsFromFile(_streamReader1)
                .Except(GetWordsFromFile(_streamReader2));
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Likely not worth doing, but you could try AsParallel() before the Except – James Manning Jul 1 '12 at 21:25
    
@JamesManning Funny you should mention... I did just that and I didn't measure any performance improvement at all. I think you are right when you say that loading the files into memory is going to dominate the time, not the actual Except operation. – Kevin Aenmey Jul 1 '12 at 21:26
    
@Kevin lol, I was able to measure a performance improvement of three thousandths of a second faster on average, but I do have a 6-core computer, and actually it could have been a fluke. See my test program. – Xantix Jul 2 '12 at 8:06

What you are looking for is called a merge join. You can use this algorithm in slightly different form to calculate any of the following:

  • inner join
  • outer join
  • except
  • intersect
  • union
  • union all

And surely others. I guess you will find lots of information when searching for that particular name.

share|improve this answer
    
I did searched and I read this article necessaryandsufficient.net/2010/02/join-algorithms-illustrated but I didn't managed to parallel the work. I need to parallel the work otherwise it will take very long. Can you please help? Is what I started is correct? – theateist Jul 1 '12 at 20:53
1  
This is very hard to parallelize, but I guess you can make this run as fast as the disk can read. Do you really need more speed? Disk is the bottleneck, not CPU. – usr Jul 1 '12 at 21:03

I saw the posted answers, and thought "I wonder how the different approaches compare?"

Anyway, I downloaded 2 dictionary files, wrote timing code, and pasted the posted code into vs2010.

Output gives:

> ManningsBaseCase1:   ElapsedTime: 0.1973, numOfIterations: 64
> ManningsBaseCase2:   ElapsedTime: 0.2036, numOfIterations: 64
> KevinsLINQ1:         ElapsedTime: 0.1803, numOfIterations: 64
> KevinsLINQ2:         ElapsedTime: 0.1773, numOfIterations: 64
> ManningsOldMerge:    ElapsedTime: 0.0797, numOfIterations: 128
> ManningsCleanMerge:  ElapsedTime: 0.0800, numOfIterations: 256

Each person's code was run enough iterations to take over 10 seconds, and then the average per iteration was taken.

The results could be slightly off -- but I didn't want to time the length of an empty For loop for 128 iterations to subtract the loop overhead (Left as exercise to the reader).

The code also verified that every approach gave the same solution.

Here's the code:

class Program
{
    private static readonly string filename1 = "DictoFile1.txt";
    private static readonly string filename2 = "DictoFile2.txt";
    private static readonly int numOfTests = 6;
    private static readonly int MinTimingVal = 1000;

    private static string[] testNames = new string[] {            
        "ManningsBaseCase1:   ",
        "ManningsBaseCase2:   ",
        "KevinsLINQ1:         ",
        "KevinsLINQ2:         ",
        "ManningsOldMerge:    ",
        "ManningsCleanMerge:  "
        };

    private static string[] prev;
    private static string[] next;

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Starting tests...");
        Debug.WriteLine("Starting tests...");

        Console.WriteLine("");
        Debug.WriteLine("");

        Action[] actionArray = new Action[numOfTests];

        actionArray[0] = ManningsBaseCase1;
        actionArray[1] = ManningsBaseCase2;
        actionArray[2] = KevinsLINQ1;
        actionArray[3] = KevinsLINQ2;
        actionArray[4] = ManningsOldInterleaved;
        actionArray[5] = ManningsCleanInterleaved;

        for( int i = 0; i < actionArray.Length; i++ )
        {
            Console.Write(testNames[i]);
            Debug.Write(testNames[i]);

            Action a = actionArray[i];
            DoTiming(a, i);

            if (i > 0)
            {
                if (!ValidateLists())
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(" --- Validation had an error.");
                    Debug.WriteLine(" --- Validation had an error.");
                }
            }

            prev = next;
        }

        Console.WriteLine("");
        Debug.WriteLine("");

        Console.WriteLine("Tests complete.");
        Debug.WriteLine("Tests complete.");

        Console.WriteLine("Press Enter to Close Console...");
        Debug.WriteLine("Press Enter to Close Console...");

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    private static bool ValidateLists()
    {
        if (prev == null) return false;
        if (next == null) return false;
        if (prev.Length != next.Length) return false;

        for (int i = 0; i < prev.Length; i++)
        {
            if (prev[i] != next[i]) return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

    private static void DoTiming( Action a, int num )
    {
        a.Invoke();

        Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
        Stopwatch loopWatch = new Stopwatch();

        bool shouldRetry = false;

        int numOfIterations = 2;

        do
        {
            watch.Start();

            for (int i = 0; i < numOfIterations; i++)
            {
                a.Invoke();
            }

            watch.Stop();

            shouldRetry = false;

            if (watch.ElapsedMilliseconds < MinTimingVal) //if the time was less than the minimum, increase load and re-time.
            {
                shouldRetry = true;
                numOfIterations *= 2;
                watch.Reset();
            }

        } while ( shouldRetry );

        long totalTime = watch.ElapsedMilliseconds;

        double avgTime = ((double)totalTime) / (double)numOfIterations;

        Console.WriteLine("ElapsedTime: {0:N4}, numOfIterations: " + numOfIterations, avgTime/1000.00);
        Debug.WriteLine("ElapsedTime: {0:N4}, numOfIterations: " + numOfIterations, avgTime / 1000.00);
    }

    private static void ManningsBaseCase1()
    {
        string[] wordsFromFile1 = File.ReadAllLines( filename1 );
        string[] wordsFromFile2 = File.ReadAllLines( filename2 );
        IEnumerable<string> file1ExceptFile2 = wordsFromFile1.Except(wordsFromFile2);
        string[] asArray = file1ExceptFile2.ToArray();
        next = asArray;
    }

    private static void ManningsBaseCase2()
    {
        string[] wordsFromFile1 = File.ReadAllLines( filename1 );
        string[] wordsFromFile2 = File.ReadAllLines( filename2 );
        IEnumerable<string> file1ExceptFile2 = wordsFromFile1.Except(wordsFromFile2, StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
        string[] asArray = file1ExceptFile2.ToArray();
        next = asArray;
    }

    private static IEnumerable<string> GetWordsFromFile(StreamReader _streamReader)
    {
        while (!_streamReader.EndOfStream)
        {
            yield return _streamReader.ReadLine();
        }
    }

    private static void KevinsLINQ1()
    {
        using (StreamReader _streamReader1 = new StreamReader(filename1))
        {
            using (StreamReader _streamReader2 = new StreamReader(filename2))
            {
               IEnumerable<string> words = GetWordsFromFile(_streamReader1)
                    .Except(GetWordsFromFile(_streamReader2));
               string[] asArray = words.ToArray();
               next = asArray;
            }
        }
    }

    private static void KevinsLINQ2()
    {
        using (StreamReader _streamReader1 = new StreamReader(filename1))
        {
            using (StreamReader _streamReader2 = new StreamReader(filename2))
            {
                IEnumerable<string> words = GetWordsFromFile(_streamReader1)
                    .Except(GetWordsFromFile(_streamReader2).AsParallel());
                string[] asArray = words.ToArray();
                next = asArray;
            }
        }
    }

    // Define other methods and classes here
    public static IEnumerable<string> ExceptSortedInputsOld(IEnumerable<string> inputSequence, IEnumerable<string> exceptSequence)
    {
        IEnumerator<string> exceptEnumerator = exceptSequence.GetEnumerator();

        IEnumerator<string> inputEnumerator = inputSequence.GetEnumerator();
        while (inputEnumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            // need to move the except sequence forward to ensure it's at or later than the current input word
            while (String.Compare(inputEnumerator.Current, exceptEnumerator.Current) == 1)
            {
                if (exceptEnumerator.MoveNext() == false)
                {
                    // stupid optimization - since there are no more except matches, we can just return the rest of the input
                    do
                    {
                        yield return inputEnumerator.Current;
                    }
                    while (inputEnumerator.MoveNext());
                    yield break;
                }
            }

            // when we get here, we know the current 'except' word is equal to or later than the input one, so we can just check equality
            if (inputEnumerator.Current != exceptEnumerator.Current)
            {
                yield return inputEnumerator.Current;
            }
        }
    }

    private static void ManningsOldInterleaved()
    {
        IEnumerable<string> wordsFromFile1 = File.ReadLines(filename1);
        IEnumerable<string> wordsFromFile2 = File.ReadLines(filename2);
        IEnumerable<string> file1ExceptFile2 = ExceptSortedInputsOld(wordsFromFile1, wordsFromFile2);

        string[] asArray = file1ExceptFile2.ToArray();
        next = asArray;
    }


    private static IEnumerable<string> ExceptSortedInputsClean(IEnumerable<string> inputSequence, IEnumerable<string> exceptSequence)
    {
        IEnumerator<string> exceptEnumerator = exceptSequence.GetEnumerator();
        bool exceptStillHasElements = exceptEnumerator.MoveNext();

        IEnumerator<string> inputEnumerator = inputSequence.GetEnumerator();
        bool inputStillHasElements = inputEnumerator.MoveNext();

        while (inputStillHasElements)
        {
            if (exceptStillHasElements == false)
            {
                // since we exhausted the except sequence, we know we can safely return any input elements
                yield return inputEnumerator.Current;
                inputStillHasElements = inputEnumerator.MoveNext();
                continue;
            }

            // need to compare to see which operation to perform
            switch (String.Compare(inputEnumerator.Current, exceptEnumerator.Current))
            {
                case -1:
                    // except sequence is already later, so we can safely return this
                    yield return inputEnumerator.Current;
                    inputStillHasElements = inputEnumerator.MoveNext();
                    break;

                case 0:
                    // except sequence has a match, so we can safely skip this
                    inputEnumerator.MoveNext();
                    break;

                case 1:
                    // except sequence is behind - we need to move it forward
                    exceptStillHasElements = exceptEnumerator.MoveNext();
                    break;
            }
        }
    }


    private static void ManningsCleanInterleaved()
    {
        IEnumerable<string> wordsFromFile1 = File.ReadLines(filename1);
        IEnumerable<string> wordsFromFile2 = File.ReadLines(filename2);
        IEnumerable<string> file1ExceptFile2 = ExceptSortedInputsClean(wordsFromFile1, wordsFromFile2);

        string[] asArray = file1ExceptFile2.ToArray();
        next = asArray;
    }

}

Just copy and paste into VS2010 .Net 4.0, add txt files and usings, and it should work.

Note: I changed the MinTimingVal back down to 1 second, instead of 10.

So, anyway, the Merge approach by Manning beat the rest by a factor of 2.

Good Work Manning.

That all said, I still think it might be possible to parallelize the file input by using FileStream class. Create two different FileStreams on the same file, have 1 start at the beginning, and have the other Seek() or set its .Position to the middle of the file and read from there.

If I get around to it, I might give it a try just to see if parallelizing I/O operations actually gives a speed-up.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for timing. It helped a lot to understand! – theateist Jul 3 '12 at 8:45

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