Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have data in different columns but I don't know how to extract it to save it in another variable.

index  a   b   c
1      2   3   4
2      3   4   5

How do I select b, c and save it in to df1?

I tried

df1 = df['a':'b']
df1 = df.ix[:, 'a':'b']

None seem to work. Any ideas would help thanks.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 43 down vote accepted

The column names (which are strings) cannot be sliced in the manner you tried.

Here you have a couple of options. If you know from context which variables you want to slice out, you can just return a view of only those columns by passing a list into the __getitem__ syntax (the []'s).

df1 = df[['a','b']]

Alternatively, if it matters to index them numerically and not by their name (say your code should automatically do this without knowing the names of the first two columns) then you can do this instead:

df1 = df.ix[:,0:2] # Remember that Python does not slice inclusive of the ending index.

Additionally, you should familiarize yourself with the idea of a view into a Pandas object vs. a copy of that object. The first of the above methods will return a new copy in memory of the desired sub-object (the desired slices).

Sometimes, however, there are indexing conventions in Pandas that don't do this and instead give you a new variable that just refers to the same chunk of memory as the sub-object or slice in the original object. This will happen with the second way of indexing, so you can modify it with the copy() function to get a regular copy. When this happens, changing what you think is the sliced object can sometimes alter the original object. Always good to be on the look out for this.

df1 = df.ix[0,0:2].copy() # To avoid the case where changing df1 also changes df
share|improve this answer
6  
Note: df[['a','b']] produces a copy –  Wes McKinney Jul 8 '12 at 17:54
    
Yes this was implicit in my answer. The bit about the copy was only for use of ix[] if you prefer to use ix[] for any reason. –  EMS Jul 8 '12 at 18:09
    
ix indexes rows, not columns. I thought the OP wanted columns. –  hobs Oct 31 '12 at 18:58
2  
ix accepts slice arguments, so you can also get columns. For example, df.ix[0:2, 0:2] gets the upper left 2x2 sub-array just like it does for a NumPy matrix (depending on your column names of course). You can even use the slice syntax on string names of the columns, like df.ix[0, 'Col1':'Col5']. That gets all columns that happen to be ordered between Col1 and Col5 in the df.columns array. It is incorrect to say that ix indexes rows. That is just its most basic use. It also supports much more indexing than that. So, ix is perfectly general for this question. –  EMS Oct 31 '12 at 19:02
2  
Thanks for the education. You're right. Never knew about that feature of ix. –  hobs Oct 31 '12 at 19:33
In [39]: df
Out[39]: 
   index  a  b  c
0      1  2  3  4
1      2  3  4  5

In [40]: df1 = df[['b', 'c']]

In [41]: df1
Out[41]: 
   b  c
0  3  4
1  4  5
share|improve this answer

Assuming your column names (df.columns) are ['index','a','b','c'], then the data you want is in the 3rd & 4th columns. If you don't know their names when your script runs, you can do this

newdf = df[df.columns[2:4]] # Remember, Python is 0-based! The "3nd" entry is at slot 2.

As EMS points out in his answer, df.ix slices columns a bit more concisely, but the .columns slicing interface might be a more natural because it uses the vanilla 1-D python list indexing/slicing syntax.

share|improve this answer
1  
As I noted in my comment above, .ix is not just for rows. It is for general purpose slicing, and can be used for multidimensional slicing. It is basically just an interface to NumPy's usual __getitem__ syntax. That said, you can easily convert a column-slicing problem into a row-slicing problem by just applying a transpose operation, df.T. Your example uses columns[1:3], which is a little misleading. The result of columns is a Series; be careful not to just treat it like an array. Also, you should probably change it to be columns[2:3] to match up with your "3rd & 4th" comment. –  EMS Oct 31 '12 at 19:11
    
Ahh, yes you're right. Missed the comma inside the brackets. Cool trick. –  hobs Oct 31 '12 at 19:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.