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I'm working on my first project in which I'm utilizing PHPUnit for unit testing. Things have been moving along nicely; however, I've started getting the following output with recent tests:

................................................................. 65 / 76 ( 85%)
...........

Time: 1 second, Memory: 30.50Mb

OK (76 tests, 404 assertions)

I cannot find any information about what the "65 / 76 ( 85%)" means.

Does anyone know how to interpret this?

Thanks!

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possible duplicate of Percentage of tests executed –  nhahtdh Feb 23 '13 at 6:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

It means the amount of tests that have been run so far (test methods actually, or to be even more precise: test method calls, because each test method can be called several times).

65 / 76 ( 85%)

65 tests of 76 have already run (which is 85% overall)

And as long as you see dots for each of them - all of them passed

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1  
Oh geez...so that it just telling me how many have run at that point? Ha...awesome. I thought I started doing something wrong, but it appears that I get that output because I passed a particular threshold. Thanks! –  tollmanz Jul 1 '12 at 21:51
    
@Sardine: yep, it is that simple –  zerkms Jul 1 '12 at 21:52
    
Awesome! In precisely 10 minutes, I will accept this answer. I appreciate your help. –  tollmanz Jul 1 '12 at 21:53

I didn't understand it until I kept writing more tests, here's a sample of what you see as the number of tests grow:

...............................................................  63 / 152 ( 41%)
...............................................................  126 / 152 ( 82%)
..........................

...it's just a progress indicator of the number of tests that have been run. But as you can see, it still gets to the end.

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