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So, I create a header file that has the following:

namespace A
{

template<int a>
void foo(...)
{
    //This throws a "test was not declared in this scope" error:
    boost::function< bool (int, int)> t = test<a>; 
}

template<int a>
bool test(int c, int d)
{
    //Do stuff;
}
}

However, the error is thrown on compilation, and I don't know why. test is obviously in scope.

replacing test<a> with boost:ref(test<a>) or &test<a> still doesn't work.

Any ideas?

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1  
You need a forward declaration of test, just like you would for any other function. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 1 '12 at 23:26
    
I can't believe I missed the obvious... thanks. –  Andrew Spott Jul 2 '12 at 2:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to atleast declare something before you can use it. The compiler doesn't know it actually exists before that.

namespace A
{

template<int a>
bool test(int c, int d);

template<int a>
void foo(...)
{
    //This throws a "test was not declared in this scope" error:
    boost::function< bool (int, int)> t = test<a>; 
}

template<int a>
bool test(int c, int d)
{
    //Do stuff;
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Expanding on this answer, the statement at lines 4-5 is the forward declaration of test, i.e. a preliminary declaration for the actual definition that is stated later, at lines 14-18. –  Marco Leogrande Jul 2 '12 at 0:52

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