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What is the accepted pattern for CmdLets and disposable fields?

The FxCop rule is: Types that own disposable fields should be disposable

But unless PowerShell calls the dispose method.... it wont really help to implement the pattern.

so far I go with Begin/EndProcessing methods to set up and clear out the fields.

I could sadly not find any documentation on whether PowerShell properly calls the Dispose method.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When implementing a Cmdlet (or PSCmdlet) derived command, implement IDisposable and PowerShell will dispose your command for you when the pipeline completes. It's as simple as that. Are you seeing behaviour that contradicts this?

Update, a la LetMeGoogleThatForYou:

"...For this reason, a cmdlet that requires object cleanup should implement the complete IDisposable pattern, including a finalizer, so that the runtime can call both the System.Management.Automation.Cmdlet.EndProcessing and Dispose methods at the end of processing."

From: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms714463(v=vs.85).aspx

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Nope,just asking - could not find any reference to IDisposable in cmdlets at all in the documentation. –  TomTom Jul 3 '12 at 4:13
    
Really? I googled "pipeline idisposable" and it appeared in the second link of results. I'll update my question with the link. –  x0n Jul 3 '12 at 15:34
    
THanks. Must have missed that one. I looked for Cmdlet IDisposable, not Pipeline ;) –  TomTom Jul 3 '12 at 15:42
    
"Cmdlet idisposable" is also the 2nd link in a google search. Are you telling me porkies? :D "Cmdlet idisposable powershell" is the first result. –  x0n Jul 3 '12 at 15:46
    
Not really. Could be a language issue - I regularly get funny results here. –  TomTom Jul 3 '12 at 15:50

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