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This has probably something to do with my transformations, but right now I can't figure this out and this is driving me instane. I have wrapped the draw code so that I can easily define new triangles. However, when I put this into a function, it just shows a grey screen. Te function code is as follows:

 public void Draw(float[] mViewMatrix, float[] mModelMatrix, float[] mProjectionMatrix, int mPositionHandle,  int mColorHandle, int mMVPMatrixHandle)
{

    long time = SystemClock.uptimeMillis() % 10000L;
    float angleInDegrees = (360.0f / 10000.0f) * ((int) time);      

    Matrix.setIdentityM(mModelMatrix, 0);
    Matrix.rotateM(mModelMatrix, 0, angleInDegrees, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);     

    aBuffer = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(verts.length * mBytesPerFloat)
    .order(ByteOrder.nativeOrder()).asFloatBuffer();



    //aBuffer.position(mPositionOffset);
    GLES20.glVertexAttribPointer(mPositionHandle, mPositionDataSize, GLES20.GL_FLOAT, false,
            mStrideBytes, aBuffer);        

    GLES20.glEnableVertexAttribArray(mPositionHandle);        

    // Pass in the color information
    aBuffer.position(mColorOffset);
    GLES20.glVertexAttribPointer(mColorHandle, mColorDataSize, GLES20.GL_FLOAT, false,
            mStrideBytes, aBuffer);        

    GLES20.glEnableVertexAttribArray(mColorHandle);

    // This multiplies the view matrix by the model matrix, and stores the result in the MVP matrix
    // (which currently contains model * view).
    Matrix.multiplyMM(mMVPMatrix, 0, mViewMatrix, 0, mModelMatrix, 0);

    // This multiplies the modelview matrix by the projection matrix, and stores the result in the MVP matrix
    // (which now contains model * view * projection).
    Matrix.multiplyMM(mMVPMatrix, 0, mProjectionMatrix, 0, mMVPMatrix, 0);

    GLES20.glUniformMatrix4fv(mMVPMatrixHandle, 1, false, mMVPMatrix, 0);
    GLES20.glDrawArrays(GLES20.GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 3); 
}

The code which IS working is:

        public void onDrawFrame(GL10 glUnused) 
{
    GLES20.glClear(GLES20.GL_DEPTH_BUFFER_BIT | GLES20.GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);                    



    // Do a complete rotation every 10 seconds.
    long time = SystemClock.uptimeMillis() % 10000L;
    float angleInDegrees = (360.0f / 10000.0f) * ((int) time);

    // Draw the triangle facing straight on.
    Matrix.setIdentityM(mModelMatrix, 0);
    Matrix.rotateM(mModelMatrix, 0, angleInDegrees, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);        
    drawTriangle(mTriangle1Vertices);

    // Draw one translated a bit down and rotated to be flat on the ground.
    Matrix.setIdentityM(mModelMatrix, 0);
    Matrix.translateM(mModelMatrix, 0, 0.0f, -1.0f, 0.0f);
    Matrix.rotateM(mModelMatrix, 0, 90.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
    Matrix.rotateM(mModelMatrix, 0, angleInDegrees, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);        
    drawTriangle(mTriangle2Vertices);

    // Draw one translated a bit to the right and rotated to be facing to the left.
    Matrix.setIdentityM(mModelMatrix, 0);
    Matrix.translateM(mModelMatrix, 0, 1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
    Matrix.rotateM(mModelMatrix, 0, 90.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
    Matrix.rotateM(mModelMatrix, 0, angleInDegrees, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);
    drawTriangle(mTriangle3Vertices);
    */

    /*
    for (int x = 0; x < staticHolder.objectList.size(); x++)
    {
        staticHolder.objectList.get(x).Draw(mViewMatrix, mModelMatrix, mProjectionMatrix, mPositionHandle, mColorHandle, mMVPMatrixHandle);
    }
    */
}   

/**
 * Draws a triangle from the given vertex data.
 * 
 * @param aTriangleBuffer The buffer containing the vertex data.
 */
private void drawTriangle(final FloatBuffer aTriangleBuffer)
{       
    // Pass in the position information
    aTriangleBuffer.position(mPositionOffset);
    GLES20.glVertexAttribPointer(mPositionHandle, mPositionDataSize, GLES20.GL_FLOAT, false,
            mStrideBytes, aTriangleBuffer);        

    GLES20.glEnableVertexAttribArray(mPositionHandle);        

    // Pass in the color information
    aTriangleBuffer.position(mColorOffset);
    GLES20.glVertexAttribPointer(mColorHandle, mColorDataSize, GLES20.GL_FLOAT, false,
            mStrideBytes, aTriangleBuffer);        

    GLES20.glEnableVertexAttribArray(mColorHandle);

    // This multiplies the view matrix by the model matrix, and stores the result in the MVP matrix
    // (which currently contains model * view).
    Matrix.multiplyMM(mMVPMatrix, 0, mViewMatrix, 0, mModelMatrix, 0);

    // This multiplies the modelview matrix by the projection matrix, and stores the result in the MVP matrix
    // (which now contains model * view * projection).
    Matrix.multiplyMM(mMVPMatrix, 0, mProjectionMatrix, 0, mMVPMatrix, 0);

    GLES20.glUniformMatrix4fv(mMVPMatrixHandle, 1, false, mMVPMatrix, 0);
    GLES20.glDrawArrays(GLES20.GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 3);                               
}

I am passing in the same variables and the final variables used here are initialized the same. There is some other work that happens in the function for encapsulation. Any idea why it is refusing to render in the function?

The following code loads the objects in the list:

  final float[] triangle1VerticesData = {
            // X, Y, Z, 
            // R, G, B, A
            -0.5f, -0.25f, 0.0f, 
            1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f,

            0.5f, -0.25f, 0.0f,
            0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f,

            0.0f, 0.559016994f, 0.0f, 
            0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f};

    final float[] triangle2VerticesData = {
            // X, Y, Z, 
            // R, G, B, A
            -0.5f, -0.25f, 0.0f, 
            1.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f,

            0.5f, -0.25f, 0.0f, 
            0.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f,

            0.0f, 0.559016994f, 0.0f, 
            1.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f};

    // This triangle is white, gray, and black.
    final float[] triangle3VerticesData = {
            // X, Y, Z, 
            // R, G, B, A
            -0.5f, -0.25f, 0.0f, 
            1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f,

            0.5f, -0.25f, 0.0f, 
            0.5f, 0.5f, 0.5f, 1.0f,

            0.0f, 0.559016994f, 0.0f, 
            0.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f};

    staticHolder.objectList.add(new Triangle(triangle1VerticesData));
    staticHolder.objectList.add(new Triangle(triangle2VerticesData));
    staticHolder.objectList.add(new Triangle(triangle3VerticesData));

The receiving class is:

    public class Triangle extends shape 
    {

     public Triangle(float[] data)
     {
          verts = data;
     }

     }
share|improve this question
    
Why have you commented out aBuffer.position(mPositionOffset);? This is a necessary line of code. –  Eric Jul 2 '12 at 5:35
    
I must of left it commented out since i was messing around with trying to get it to work –  Serguei Fedorov Jul 2 '12 at 5:36
    
If it still doesn't work when you've uncommented it, then the troublemaker code lies elsewhere (probably in the initialization of the surface or the GL object). –  Eric Jul 2 '12 at 5:37
    
Why would the first way work and not the second? –  Serguei Fedorov Jul 2 '12 at 5:38
    
The issue could be in the buffers passed to the staticHolder.objectList. As I'm sure you've noticed, the draw code itself is a perfect clone of the working one (except the name of aBuffer). Have you verified that Draw is being called at all? –  Eric Jul 2 '12 at 5:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After the following bit of code:

aBuffer = ByteBuffer.allocateDirect(verts.length * mBytesPerFloat).order(ByteOrder.nativeOrder()).asFloatBuffer();

You must put the vertices into the buffer (otherwise, it's blank!):

aBuffer.put(verts);

The reason this isn't in the bit of code that works, is because those three sets of vertices' buffers are pre-allocated, and the vertices are put into it then (at initialization). They are simply passed to the method each time, so they don't have to be put() in again.

On that note, you will want to avoid allocations in your Draw method, as it's called many times per frame and could lead to slow rendering. Allocate aBuffer once, and put new vertices into it each time.

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic! Thank you very much! I am very new to anything GL (had a class in college on openGL in C++, which taught absolutely nothing salvageable). I have been looking for a solution for a few hours! I owe you one! –  Serguei Fedorov Jul 2 '12 at 6:05
    
No problem! I've been learning GL as well... 2.0 is such a pain, isn't it? Good luck in your journey! :) –  Eric Jul 2 '12 at 6:06
    
Eh, for some reason college/highschool had very little interest in teaching me anything math so geometric programming is like a thick forest. Do you have any resources I could rely on to quickly learn this? I find that most openGL tutorials are written by fairly "oh you should already know this, dumbass!" kind type of people, making their tutorials completely useless –  Serguei Fedorov Jul 2 '12 at 6:11
    
I don't know that I'll be much help in that department; I picked up on geometry very quickly (sans Linear Algebra... luckily that's mostly for 3D). I would say your best sources are going to be either books (check in the library, Amazon, or Google Play), or non-Android OpenGL 2.0 tutorials. This isn't math-related but is very helpful, at least to me. –  Eric Jul 2 '12 at 6:15

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