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my .exe and addrr.txt files are located on D:\ drive

when im trying to ready .txt file ifstream does nothing

this is my code:

 ifstream file;
        file.open("addrr.txt", fstream::in | fstream::out);
        if (file.is_open())
        {
            while (file.good())
            {
                cout << "Addrr.txt IsGood" <<endl;
                getline(file, Path);
            }

            file.close();
        }

sorry for such dumb question. im noob

share|improve this question
    
Are you running the program in D:\ ? If not, change the filename name "addrr.txt" to "D:\addrr.txt" –  loki11 Jul 2 '12 at 7:14
    
they are at the same location(D:\test.exe, D:\addrr.txt) –  user525717 Jul 2 '12 at 7:19
    
what directory are you in when you run your program? –  jxh Jul 2 '12 at 7:22
    
am calling it from browser so directory is: C:\\Program Files...... –  user525717 Jul 2 '12 at 7:26
1  
This is one of those cases where you fire up Process Monitor - technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896645.aspx and just determine what file is being looked for on the fopen. –  Petesh Jul 2 '12 at 7:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

UPDATE

To make sure that the file addrr.txt can be found during runtime of the application you need to

  • specify the absolute path to the file, i.e. D:\addrr.txt, or
  • specify the relative path from the current working directory (CWD), which is C:\Program Files\Mozilla FireFox apparantly. (Which is impractical if the file is located on another partition.)

The CWD is usually the directory from which the application is run. If you'd run your application in D: it should work. (Your application may well change the CWD at runtime (e.g. by use of chdir(), or SetCurrentDirectory()). However, usually it is more appropriate to specify the absolute path to the files or to place the files in the correct relative location to the CWD.)


This compiles and runs fine for me:

#include <fstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

int main() {
  ifstream file;
  file.open("addrr.txt", fstream::in | fstream::out);
  if (file.is_open())
  {
    while (file.good())
    {
      string Path;
      cout << "Addrr.txt IsGood" <<endl;
      getline(file, Path);
      cout << Path << endl;
    }
    file.close();
  }
}

// output similar to:
/*
Addrr.txt IsGood
addrr.txt
Addrr.txt IsGood
addrr.txt
Addrr.txt IsGood
addrr.txt
Addrr.txt IsGood

Addrr.txt IsGood

*/


// file: addrr.txt
/*
addrr.txt
addrr.txt
addrr.txt

*/

Is your filename correct (i.e. case sensitively speaking)? Do you run your application from the path where the executable is located (s.t. the file is located in the current working directory)?

share|improve this answer
    
my .exe file opening from browser and path is C:\Program Files\Mozilla FireFox. –  user525717 Jul 2 '12 at 7:37
1  
+1, but "current working directory is usually the directory from which the application is called" is rather imprecise. It is defined by the calling process, i.e. browser, explorer, cmd.exe etc. In the common cases from Windows Explorer it is the directory the application is in, for cmd.exe it is the directory in the prompt, when executing through link it is specified as property of the link. In other cases like FireFox, well, you have to know what that program does. –  Jan Hudec Jul 2 '12 at 8:03

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