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Could someone please explain why 'this' in the following points to the DOM Object and not to Window?

$("a").click(function() {
    console.log(this);
});

This yields to:

<a id="first" href="http://jquery.com">

Consider the following which should be the same scenario:

function Foo() {
    this.click = function(f) {
        f();
    }
}

var obj = new Foo();
obj.click(function() {
    console.log(this);
});

What we get here is the Window Object (what I had expected).

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jQuery manipulates this where needed. –  Blaster Jul 2 '12 at 7:53
    
As usual, the MDN has some good information about this: developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/… –  Niko Jul 2 '12 at 7:56
    
I think the person you should ask is John Resig who is responsible for the concept as far as I can tell - I believe it's his doing. Believe it or not - but he is an active member here as well. :) –  Shadow Wizard Jul 2 '12 at 7:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's up to the context in which the function is executed. jQuery explicitly changes the context of the callback function, whereas your function executes the function in the global context.

to change the context:

function Foo() {
    this.click = function(f) {
        f.apply(this);
    }
}

or

function Foo() {
    this.click = function(f) {
        this.f = f
        this.f();
    }
}

For further reading:

http://dailyjs.com/2012/06/18/js101-this/

http://dailyjs.com/2012/06/25/this-binding/

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Good answer man :P this also refers to the current element on the DOM that was invoked. +1 rep –  Killrawr Jul 2 '12 at 7:59
    
Yes, thank you for that note :) –  Gottox Jul 2 '12 at 8:19
    
or f.call(this); –  newacct Jul 2 '12 at 18:20

this will be decided by the context.

If you change your code to below, then this will point to some_other_object.

function Foo() {
    this.click = function(f) {
        f.call(some_other_object);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

In Javascript, OOP is different from what you're accustomed to in languages like Java.

Basically, it is easier to think that there is no OOP and that this is just a "hidden argument" of functions.

For example, when you see

function f(x, y, z) {
    console.log(this, x, y, z);
}

think that in common OOP languages (such as Java) that would be

function f(this, x, y, z) {
    console.log(this, x, y, z);
}

When you see var a = b.f(x, y, z);, think var a = f(b, x, y, z).

When you see var a = f(x, y, z); think var a = f(undefined, x, y, z); (In browser environment, when strict mode is not activated, it is f(window, x, y, z);)

Now it should be easier to understand why this in your example means different things in the nested scopes.

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+1 - good explanation –  Jakub Konecki Jul 2 '12 at 8:01

jQuery uses the javascript apply function when calling event handlers. From the mdn documentation:

Calls a function with a given this value and arguments provided as an array.

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