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Why does the following code block print out "40" repeatedly,

vector<Square> array(81);

char c;
int d;

int i = 0;

for(c='A'; c<'J'; c=c+1)
  for(d=1; d<10; d++)
    array.push_back( Square(c, d));

for(int i = 0; i<81; i++)
  cout << array[i].column << array[i].row << endl;
  }

Whereas this prints out, A1, A2, A3, .... , I9

vector<Square> array(81);

char c;
int d;

int i = 0;

for(c='A'; c<'J'; c=c+1)
  for(d=1; d<10; d++)
    array[i++] = ( Square(c, d));

for(i = 0; i<81; i++)
  cout << array[i].column << array[i].row << endl;
} 

Does pushing back put it in random memory that has to be accessed via iterator? Is it better to always use iterators when looking through a vector?

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No one else has mentioned that what you may have been trying to achieve with array(81); can be done with reserve(81);. en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/vector/reserve – BoBTFish Jul 2 '12 at 8:38

vector<Square> array(81); declares a vector with 81 elements. When you push_back, you insert new elements, i.e. the used size will increase to 82, 83,... and your existing elements will be unchanged.

So - in your first snippet you print out the elements that are in the vector before any of the push_backs. The second snippet replaces the elements with the ones you want.

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Ahhh! Of course, thank you. – ordinary Jul 2 '12 at 8:25

Each time you use the push_back, a new element is created appended to the end of the vector.

If you want your first code example to work properly, you should avoid setting the vector size, and declare it as vector<square> array;

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