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I am quite new in regular expression so I am having confusion in replacing numbers inside an string.

a="12ab34cde56" 

I want to replace it by 12abXXcde56

b="abc1235ef"

I want to replace it by abcXXXXef

c="1ab12cd"

I want to replace it by 1abXXcd

I am trying those in python and in php, but with no luck. This is what I had in my mind:

^([0-9]+)([a-z]+)(.*)([a-z]+)([0-9]+)$
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So "1f4d6f5" --> "1fXdXf5"? What about "1 f 5 g f5 6 h 8"? –  nhahtdh Jul 2 '12 at 9:35
2  
Could you tell us what you've tried so far? You'd learn a lot more if you we can guide you with your own code. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 2 '12 at 9:36
    
@nhahtdh yes you are right, any numbers that are not leading or trailing a string would be replace by X –  Maverick_Mrt Jul 2 '12 at 9:37
    
@MartijnPieters, This is what I have in my mind, ^([0-9]+)([a-z]+)(.*)([a-z]+)([0-9]+)$ could you please explain my fault –  Maverick_Mrt Jul 2 '12 at 9:44
    
@Maverick_Mrt: With that, you are assuming that there are at least a leading or trailing digit +, but it may not be true. –  nhahtdh Jul 2 '12 at 9:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use this regex to capture all digits that is not leading or trailing:

(?<!^|\d)\d+(?!$|\d)

Then in Python, you can supply a function that replace the match with corresponding number of X.

For PHP, you can enable PREG_OFFSET_CAPTURE to know the position of the match, and loop through the list of matches and process them.

Note that with the regex above " 5 ddds" will be changed into " X ddds"

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Have you tried this with the three strings in the question? –  Marco de Wit Jul 2 '12 at 9:58
    
@MarcodeWit: Thanks. Just tested with PHP. –  nhahtdh Jul 2 '12 at 10:03

The following pattern catch the string to remove in group 1:

^.*[a-z]+(\d+)[a-z]+.*$

Demo.

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The only possibility with the stock re module appears to be a replace function, for example:

xs = ["12ab34cde56", "abc1235ef", "1ab12cd"]

import re
for x in xs:
    print x, re.sub(r'(\D)(\d+)(\D)', lambda m: m.group(1) + 'X' * len(m.group(2)) + m.group(3), x)

With the more advanced regex module you can use variable-width lookaround assertions:

import regex
for x in xs:
    print x, regex.sub(r'(?<=\D\d*)\d(?=\d*\D)', 'X', x)    
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Please check whether the first solution can replace this case correctly: "4f6g6h7" –  nhahtdh Jul 2 '12 at 10:16

We substitute every group of digits (\d+) surrounded by non-digits (\D) in the string s by X's .

re.sub(r'(?<=\D)\d+(?=\D)',lambda match : 'X' * len(match.group(0)) , s)
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he's replacing only those digits which are within alphabets. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 2 '12 at 9:40
    
Your code might fail for these inputs: "sdf34", "4df34df34f34fff8" –  nhahtdh Jul 2 '12 at 10:06
    
@nhahtdh Ok, solved –  Marco de Wit Jul 2 '12 at 11:03
import re
re1 = re.compile("([\d]*[a-zA-Z])([\d\w]+)([a-zA-Z][\d]*)")
re2 = re.compile("([\d])")

s = "4f6g6h7"
def x(matchobj):
    return ''.join([matchobj.groups()[0],
        re2.sub('X', matchobj.groups()[1]), matchobj.groups()[2]])

print re1.sub(x, s)

Update: The original method won't work for case"4f6g6h7" or any string only has one alphabet char between digit.

If using two regular expression instead of one is acceptable. The following code should work for u.

import re
re1 = re.compile("([\d]*[a-zA-Z])([\d\w]+)([a-zA-Z][\d]*)")
re2 = re.compile("([\d])")

s = ['12ab34cde56', "abc1235ef","1ab12cd", "4f6g6h7"]

def x(matchobj):
    return ''.join([matchobj.groups()[0],
        re2.sub('X', matchobj.groups()[1]), matchobj.groups()[2]])

for ss in s:
    print ss, '->', re1.sub(x, ss)

>>>
12ab34cde56 -> 12abXXcde56
abc1235ef -> abcXXXXef
1ab12cd -> 1abXXcd
4f6g6h7 -> 4fXgXh7
>>> 
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