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The << Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual Volume 2B: Instruction Set Reference, N-Z >> says:

| Opcode* | Instruction | Op/En | 64-Bit Mode | Compat/Leg Mode | Description |
|      6A | PUSH imm8   | C     | Valid       | Valid           | Push imm8.  |
|      68 | PUSH imm16  | C     | Valid       | Valid           | Push imm16. |
|      68 | PUSH imm32  | C     | Valid       | Valid           | Push imm32. |

# cat -n test.asm

 1  bits 64
 2
 3  push byte 12
 4  push word 12
 5  push dword 12
 6  push qword 12
 7

# nasm test.asm

 test.asm:5: error: instruction not supported in 64-bit mode
  1. Why the line 5 is illegal? I think it matches 'PUSH imm32'.

  2. And why the line 6 is legal? It does not match any of 'PUSH imm8/PUSH imm16/PUSH imm32'.

Help me, please!

======Test======

    I think that the Intel manual is right, the 'push imm' 
    instructions do have three encoding form:
    Form 1: 6a XX
    Form 2: 66 68 XX XX 
    Form 3: 68 XX XX XX XX

    What we are arguing is the implemental specific behavior of the NASM.

    In NASM 2.04rc1(the above example I given):
    1. The 'byte' in 'push byte imm' direct the NASM use the Form 1, 
       no matter how long the imm given in the instruction it is, the imm
       was trunked to a byte in final machine code. 
    2. The 'word' in 'push word imm' direct the NASM use the Form 2,
       no matter how long the imm given in the instruction it is, the imm 
       was trucked or zero-extended to a word in final machine code.
    3. The 'qword' in 'push dword imm' direct the NASM use the Form 3,
       no matter how long the imm given in the instruction it is, the imm 
       was trucked or zero-extended to a dword in final machine code.
       Note: the 'qword' in the instruction but 'dword' in final machine
       code, which made us confused.
    4. if none of 'byte', 'word', 'qword' is given, the NASM use the From 3.

See the following example:

# cat -n push.asm
1  bits 64
2
3  push byte 0x21
4  push byte 0x4321
5
6  push word 0x4321
7  push word 0x654321
8
9  push qword 0x654321
10
11  push 0x21
12  push 0x4321
13  push 0x654321
14  push 0x87654321
15  push 0xa987654321
16
# nasm -v
NASM version 2.04rc1 compiled on Feb 21 2009
# nasm push.asm -o push.bin
push.asm:4: warning: signed byte value exceeds bounds
push.asm:7: warning: word data exceeds bounds
# ndisasm -b 32 push.bin // 'ndisasm -b 64 push.bin' not works right in this version of NASM.
00000000  6A21              push byte +0x21
00000002  6A21              push byte +0x21
00000004  66682143          push word 0x4321
00000008  66682143          push word 0x4321
0000000C  6821436500        push dword 0x654321
00000011  6821000000        push dword 0x21
00000016  6821430000        push dword 0x4321
0000001B  6821436500        push dword 0x654321
00000020  6821436587        push dword 0x87654321
00000025  6821436587        push dword 0x87654321

In newer NASM, the behavior changes:
(1) 'push 0x21' was encoded to '6A21' in NASM 2.10.01,
    while '6821000000' in NASM 2.04rc1; 
(2)'push dword 0x654321' in 64 bit mode was allowed 
    in NASM 2.10.01 and encoded to '6821436500'
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The manual is wrong. (this is not the only error, by the way)

In 64bit mode, there is no 32bit push. push is one of the few instructions that is promoted to 64bit without a REX.W prefix, and you can't demote it.

edit: actually, my version of the manual says the right thing:

Push sign-extended imm32. Stack pointer is decremented by the size of stack pointer.

So in 64bit mode, that translates to "push a qword, sign extended from the immediate".

share|improve this answer
    
According to ref.x86asm.net there is a 64-bit push instruction (FF, opcode extension 6) that supports m32. Not sure if this is an error following from the manual though. –  Polynomial Jul 2 '12 at 10:08
    
@Polynomial push r/m32 is invalid in 64-bit mode. That line of the manual is correct, but the line with push imm32 is not as @harold says. –  Alexey Frunze Jul 2 '12 at 10:09
    
This is one of the numerous typos and errors in Intel documentation. The best one can do is to double check things in AMD docs. –  Alexey Frunze Jul 2 '12 at 10:11
    
Thanks for the clarification :) –  Polynomial Jul 2 '12 at 10:18
    
I was confused for a few days. Thanks! –  yang wen Jul 2 '12 at 10:41

EDIT: The stricken text below is wrong w.r.t. immediates.

Here's how it works...

Whatever the operand size is, in 64-bit mode you can only advance the stack pointer by 2 or 8 bytes with a push and write in the thusly allocated space either a 16-bit or a 64-bit value.

So, you can't push 8-bit registers or 32-bit registers as they won't get zero- or sign-extended. But you can push 16-bit or 64-bit registers.

With immediates it's a little different.

push imm8 (opcode 6Ah followed by imm8) will first sign-extend the 8-bit immediate operand to 64 bits and then push the resultant 8-byte value.

push imm32 (opcode 68h followed by imm32) will first sign-extend the 32-bit immediate operand to 64 bits and then push the resultant 8-byte value.

push imm16 (operand size prefix 66h, opcode 6Ah followed by imm16) will push the 16-bit immediate operand without any extension as a 2-byte value.

NASM appears to be a bit forgiving when you say push qword 12. But it will issue a warning if you use a value that cannot be represented as a signed 32-bit integer, e.g. push qword 0x80000000 or push qword 2147483648 or push qword -2147483649.

This is the relevant piece of documentation:
ELSE IF SRC is immediate byte
  THEN TEMP ← SignExtend(SRC); (* extend to operand size *)
ELSE IF SRC is immediate word (* operand size is 16 *)
  THEN TEMP ← SRC;
ELSE IF SRC is immediate doubleword (* operand size is 32 or 64 *)
  THEN
    IF operand size = 32
      THEN TEMP ← SRC;
      ELSE TEMP ← SignExtend(SRC); (* extend to operand size of 64 *)
FI;

Now, my version of NASM (2.09.10 compiled on Jul 15 2011) doesn't actually issue a warning or error for push dword 12. If yours really does, it's a bug.

It looks like I have found a bug in NASM. It assembles push word 12 into 66h, 6Ah, 0Ch. IOW, it uses the opcode of push imm8 for push imm16. That can't be right. Byte operands remain byte operands regardless of the operand size prefix. Only "word" operands can be expanded or reduced to double- and quad-word operands. That's how it's always been, a pair of opcodes for the same instruction, one to operate on byte operands, the other to operate on (q/d)word operands and the operand size prefix would affect the "wordness" of the "word" operand. The proper encoding of push word 12 in 64-bit mode should be 66h, 68h, 0Ch, 0h.

Line 5 is illegal because in 64-bit mode you cannot push a 32-bit operand. You can only push a 64-bit operand (push byte 12 is effectively push byte-sign-extended-to-qword 12) or a 16-bit operand. Look a the pseudo-code explaining the operation of push:

IF in 64-bit mode (* stack-address size = 64 *)
  THEN
    IF operand size = 64
      THEN
        RSP ← RSP − 8;
        Memory[RSP] ← TEMP; (* Push quadword *)
      ELSE (* operand size = 16 *)
        RSP ← RSP − 2;
        Memory[RSP] ← TEMP; (* Push word *)
FI;

I can't tell the exact reason for this, but there are two:

  1. It was convenient to implement it this way
  2. The designer tried to make unaligned stack errors less likely
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting thing there with the push imm16 encoding, that really doesn't look right –  harold Jul 2 '12 at 11:29
    
@harold Yep. The opcode map clearly says: 68h is for PUSH Iz, 6Ah is for PUSH Ib. –  Alexey Frunze Jul 2 '12 at 11:35
    
I tryed a newer NASM. Its behavir differs from older. link of the test result –  yang wen Jul 3 '12 at 3:03
    
@yangwen How is 2.04rc1 compiled on Feb 21 2009 newer than 2.09.10 compiled on Jul 15 2011? –  Alexey Frunze Jul 3 '12 at 3:06
    
@Alexey Frunze, The newer I mean is 2.10.01 –  yang wen Jul 3 '12 at 3:24
    I think that the Intel manual is right, the 'push imm' 
    instructions do have three encoding form:
    Form 1: 6a XX
    Form 2: 66 68 XX XX 
    Form 3: 68 XX XX XX XX

    What we are arguing is the implemental specific behavior of the NASM.

    In NASM 2.04rc1(the above example I given):
    1. The 'byte' in 'push byte imm' direct the NASM use the Form 1, 
       no matter how long the imm given in the instruction it is, the imm
       was trunked to a byte in final machine code. 
    2. The 'word' in 'push word imm' direct the NASM use the Form 2,
       no matter how long the imm given in the instruction it is, the imm 
       was trucked or zero-extended to a word in final machine code.
    3. The 'qword' in 'push dword imm' direct the NASM use the Form 3,
       no matter how long the imm given in the instruction it is, the imm 
       was trucked or zero-extended to a dword in final machine code.
       Note: the 'qword' in the instruction but 'dword' in final machine
       code, which made us confused.
    4. if none of 'byte', 'word', 'qword' is given, the NASM use the From 3.

See the following example:

# cat -n push.asm
1  bits 64
2
3  push byte 0x21
4  push byte 0x4321
5
6  push word 0x4321
7  push word 0x654321
8
9  push qword 0x654321
10
11  push 0x21
12  push 0x4321
13  push 0x654321
14  push 0x87654321
15  push 0xa987654321
16
# nasm -v
NASM version 2.04rc1 compiled on Feb 21 2009
# nasm push.asm -o push.bin
push.asm:4: warning: signed byte value exceeds bounds
push.asm:7: warning: word data exceeds bounds
# ndisasm -b 32 push.bin // 'ndisasm -b 64 push.bin' not works right in this version of NASM.
00000000  6A21              push byte +0x21
00000002  6A21              push byte +0x21
00000004  66682143          push word 0x4321
00000008  66682143          push word 0x4321
0000000C  6821436500        push dword 0x654321
00000011  6821000000        push dword 0x21
00000016  6821430000        push dword 0x4321
0000001B  6821436500        push dword 0x654321
00000020  6821436587        push dword 0x87654321
00000025  6821436587        push dword 0x87654321
share|improve this answer
    
In newer NASM, the behavior changes: (1) 'push 0x21' was encoded to '6A21' in NASM 2.10.01, while '6821000000' in NASM 2.04rc1; (2)'push dword 0x654321' in 64 bit mode was allowed in NASM 2.10.01 and encoded to '6821436500' –  yang wen Jul 3 '12 at 3:22
    
That's one way to look at it too. The thing here, I think, is that NASM and the Intel manual used different terminology for the same thing, but they really mean the same thing. Calling 68XXXXXXXX "a push that take a dword" or "a push that pushes a qword" is both right, but both somewhat misleading. –  harold Jul 3 '12 at 6:47

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