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I have a class like the following:

class node
{
public:

     node* parent;
     std::list<node*> children;
};

Should I use a smart pointer instead of raw pointers? Why? If yes, what kind of smart pointer?

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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Always use a smart pointer wherever you own resources (memory, files etc). Owning them manually is extremely error prone and violates many good practices, like DRY.

Which one to use depends on what ownership semantics you need. unique_ptr is best for single ownership, and shared_ptr shared ownership.

As children do not own their parents, a raw parent pointer is fine. However, if the parents own their children, unique_ptr works best here.

It's also notable that what on earth, a linked list of pointers? That makes no sense. Why not a linked list of values?

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2  
@JamesKanze: The resources of, say... the memory of the child nodes? And it's quite impossible for a unique_ptr based version of this structure to be less reliable or more complex than the raw pointer based version. In fact, unique_ptr is practically the definition of reliable and simple. Perhaps you should expand on exactly why you think the smart pointer version would be worse than the raw pointer version. –  DeadMG Jul 2 '12 at 9:59
4  
@JamesKanze: No problem. For one, you, the implementer, no longer have to manually delete the nodes. This guarantees that you cannot double delete them, or forget to delete them, and also guarantees exception safety. And you get it for removing all that code that would otherwise do deletion. So it reduces code size and guarantees safety. That sounds like a win in every way I can imagine to me. As for different pointer types, well, in C++, you use different types to do different jobs. That's a necessary fact of life. The syntax clearly indicates what is what. –  DeadMG Jul 2 '12 at 10:14
8  
@JamesKanze no. just no –  thecoshman Jul 2 '12 at 10:19
4  
@JamesKanze `Using unique_ptr almost guarantees dangling pointers` - I'm having trouble seeing what you mean. Could you point to an example? –  sehe Jul 2 '12 at 10:21
3  
@James : Manual memory management is the opposite of 'simple'. –  ildjarn Jul 2 '12 at 17:49
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It is always a good idea to use smart pointers, but beware of loops of references.

class node
{
public:
     std::weak_ptr<node> parent;
     std::list< std::shared_ptr<node> > children;
};

That's why there is the weak_ptr in the first place. Note that they are not so smart to detect the loops, you have to do it manually, and break them by using weak_ptrs.

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4  
There's no need for the parent pointer to be a non-raw pointer. –  DeadMG Jul 2 '12 at 9:46
2  
@JamesKanze: Possible, but not particularly likely, and there is no expressed need for shared ownership here, so unique ownership and a raw pointer is the simplest design. –  DeadMG Jul 2 '12 at 9:51
3  
@JamesKanze: It is impossible to capture it too late. The simple unique_ptr<T> x(new T(...)) scenario is quite bulletproof. Even for function arguments, there's the usual evaluation order hilarity, and the Standard kindly left out make_unique (accepted as a defect), but you can write your own which is guaranteed correct even in that scenario. As for too early, the unique_ptr will not release until you, the programmer, delete it. This occurs at the exact identical time as simply removing the pointer from the list and then deleting it. –  DeadMG Jul 2 '12 at 10:08
5  
As for pointer confusions, nobody who cannot tell the difference between shared_ptr<T>, unique_ptr<T>, and T* should really be coding production C++. Not to mention that the compiler can handily protect you from almost all usage errors of these pointers- not something you can say of raw pointers. –  DeadMG Jul 2 '12 at 10:09
3  
@JamesKanze: More complicated? It's a dead simple insertion for shared_ptr - much simpler than the raw pointer version, of course- and a simple std::move for unique_ptr. There's no significant complexity there. As for filling it after moving it into the tree, then ... just give out a non-owning reference on insertion. This is exactly the behaviour of Standard containers like std::map, and they function just fine. –  DeadMG Jul 2 '12 at 10:21
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Absolutely not. The usual smart pointers don't work with graph-like structures, and should be avoided. In this case, you have a tree, and there's no problem handling all of the deletions (and allocations) from the tree object itself.

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6  
Strict hierarchical graphs can be handled fine by std::unique_ptr, and any DAG can work fine with std::shared_ptr. As the structure in the question is a strict hierarchy, there is no reason to believe that either Standard smart pointer would not be perfectly correct. –  DeadMG Jul 2 '12 at 9:53
1  
@DeadMG With a bit of effort, you can manage anything. In this case, using unique_ptr or shared_ptr require significantly more effort, and are considerably more error prone, than just handling all memory management in the containing Tree class. –  James Kanze Jul 2 '12 at 10:09
3  
@JamesKanze: I don't know what effort you have in mind, but last time I checked, having the std::list destruct the value type it contains for you was free. –  DeadMG Jul 2 '12 at 10:11
7  
@JamesKanze: There are only three kinds of pointers you might care to need (on a regular basis). The decision of when to use which one is trivial, and identical to the decision of when you use delete. The only difference is that the smart pointer can implement that decision much more reliably. If you don't know when to delete an object, you have a bigger problem than what type you're using today. If you do, then you already know what smart pointer to use. –  DeadMG Jul 2 '12 at 10:17
1  
@JamesKanze: "Object Y is responsible for destructing Object Z, for a generic definition of "destruct"" is a pretty general problem. Oh, just in case you were curious, I actually did not downvote your answer. –  DeadMG Jul 2 '12 at 14:20
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