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I would like to plot the results of a multivariate logistic regression analysis (GLM) for a specific independent variables adjusted (i.e. independent of the confounders included in the model) relationship with the outcome (binary).

I have seen posts that recommend the following method using the predict command followed by curve, here's an example;

x     <- data.frame(binary.outcome, cont.exposure)
model <- glm(binary.outcome ~ cont.exposure, family=binomial, data=x)
plot(cont.exposure, binary.outcome, xlab="Temperature",ylab="Probability of Response") 
curve(predict(model, data.frame(cont.exposure=x), type="resp"), add=TRUE, col="red")

However this does not seem to work for multivariate regression models. I get the following error when I add 'age' (arbitrary - could be any variable of same length) as a confounding variable;

> x     <- data.frame(binary.outcome, cont.exposure, age)
> model <- glm(binary.outcome ~ cont.exposure + age, family=binomial, data=x)
> plot(cont.exposure, binary.outcome, xlab="Temperature",ylab="Probability of Response") 
> curve(predict(model, data.frame(cont.exposure=x), type="resp"), add=TRUE, col="red")
Error in model.frame.default(Terms, newdata, na.action = na.action, xlev = object$xlevels) : 
  variable lengths differ (found for 'age')
In addition: Warning message:
  'newdata' had 101 rows but variable(s) found have 698 rows 

The above model is a simplified version of the models I'd like to run, but the principle is the same; I would like to plot the relationship between a binary outcome variable and a continuous exposure, independent of confounding factors..

It would be great to get either a workaround for the above, or an alternative way to view the relationship I am interested in. Many thanks.

share|improve this question
    
You could have a look at the crPlots function in the car package. – BenBarnes Jul 2 '12 at 10:36
    
@BenBarnes thanks for that. I've had a look and a quick play with the data, and the function doesn't recognize that I am doing logistic regressions. However, the if I use a linear regression (ie. .my exposure is now my outcome, my binary variable an independent variable) then I do get exactly what I want. Will you post this as an answer for me to accept, or shall I? – Luke Jul 2 '12 at 11:01
    
I'm going to upvote Thierry's answer! – BenBarnes Jul 2 '12 at 11:49
    
@Luke did you ever find a good solution to this question? The accepted answer sort of missed the intent of the question, as you point out in your comment. – colin Mar 17 at 18:34
up vote 7 down vote accepted
set.seed(12345)
dataset <- expand.grid(Temp = rnorm(30), Age = runif(10))
dataset$Truth <- with(dataset, plogis(2 * Temp - 3 * Age))
dataset$Sample <- rbinom(nrow(dataset), size = 1, prob = dataset$Truth)
model <- glm(Sample ~ Temp + Age, data = dataset, family = binomial)
newdata <- expand.grid(
  Temp = pretty(dataset$Temp, 20), 
  Age = pretty(dataset$Age, 5))
newdata$Sample <- predict(model, newdata = newdata, type = "response")
library(ggplot2)
ggplot(newdata, aes(x = Temp, y = Sample)) + geom_line() + facet_wrap(~Age)

enter image description here

ggplot(newdata, aes(x = Temp, y = Sample, colour = Age, group = Age)) + 
  geom_line()

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the response - I should have specified in my question, but I provided a simplified model in my example. There are actually numerous confounding variables (some of which are continuous, others factors), and I would like to vizualize the relationship between my outcome (binary) and an exposure (continuous), independent of the other variables I include in the model. Do you know whether ggplot can do this? Thanks again – Luke Jul 2 '12 at 13:23
    
@BenBarnes does provide a good method for doing this with continuous outcomes; by running a linear regression with my binary variable as a exposure I can get a nice plot, but this is not the original logistic framework I was using, so an alternative would also be great. – Luke Jul 2 '12 at 13:27
    
@LukeTheDuke: in that case set a range of values for the covariate of interest and fix all other covariates at a relevant level. – Thierry Jul 2 '12 at 17:53

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