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Say I have an array of JavaScript objects:

var objs = [ 
        { first_nom: 'Lazslo', last_nom: 'Jamf'     },
        { first_nom: 'Pig',    last_nom: 'Bodine'   },
        { first_nom: 'Pirate', last_nom: 'Prentice' }
    ];

How can I sort them by the value of last_nom in JavaScript?

I know about sort(a,b), but that only seems to work on strings and numbers. Do I need to add a toString method to my objects?

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Now, can anyone post how to do this via an insertion sort? –  Ray Jun 14 '13 at 21:44
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11 Answers

up vote 465 down vote accepted

It's easy enough to write your own comparison function:

function compare(a,b) {
  if (a.last_nom < b.last_nom)
     return -1;
  if (a.last_nom > b.last_nom)
    return 1;
  return 0;
}

objs.sort(compare);
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7  
thanks. Didn't know that sort took a function ref. –  Tyrone Slothrop Jul 15 '09 at 3:45
86  
Or inline: objs.sort(function(a,b) {return (a.last_nom > b.last_nom) ? 1 : ((b.last_nom > a.last_nom) ? -1 : 0);} ); –  Marco Demaio Feb 24 '10 at 18:29
7  
2  
return a.last_nom.localeCompare(b.last_nom) will work, too. –  Cerbrus Feb 14 '13 at 10:37
3  
for those looking for a sort where the field is numeric, the compare function body: return a.value - b.value; (ASC) –  André Figueiredo Jan 8 at 12:06
show 5 more comments

You can also create a dynamic sort function that sorts objects by their value that you pass:

function dynamicSort(property) {
    var sortOrder = 1;
    if(property[0] === "-") {
        sortOrder = -1;
        property = property.substr(1);
    }
    return function (a,b) {
        var result = (a[property] < b[property]) ? -1 : (a[property] > b[property]) ? 1 : 0;
        return result * sortOrder;
    }
}

So you can have an array of objects like this:

var People = [
    {Name: "Name", Surname: "Surname"},
    {Name:"AAA", Surname:"ZZZ"},
    {Name: "Name", Surname: "AAA"}
];

...and it will work when you do:

People.sort(dynamicSort("Name"));
People.sort(dynamicSort("Surname"));
People.sort(dynamicSort("-Surname"));

Multiple Parameters

You can use the function below to generate sort functions with multiple sort parameters.

function dynamicSortMultiple() {
    /*
     * save the arguments object as it will be overwritten
     * note that arguments object is an array-like object
     * consisting of the names of the properties to sort by
     */
    var props = arguments;
    return function (obj1, obj2) {
        var i = 0, result = 0, numberOfProperties = props.length;
        /* try getting a different result from 0 (equal)
         * as long as we have extra properties to compare
         */
        while(result === 0 && i < numberOfProperties) {
            result = dynamicSort(props[i])(obj1, obj2);
            i++;
        }
        return result;
    }
}

Which would enable you to do something like this:

People.sort(dynamicSortMultiple("Name", "-Surname"));

Adding It To The Prototype

(Implementation which is just below is inspired from Mike R's answer)

I wouldn't recommend changing a native object prototype but just to give an example so you can implement it on your own objects (For the environments that support it, you can also use Object.defineProperty as shown in the next section, which doesn't have the negative side-effects of fiddling with a native object's prototype, as described at the last part)

Prototype implementation would be something like the following (Here's a working example):

//Don't just copy-paste this code. You will break the "for-in" loops
!function() {
    function _dynamicSortMultiple(attr) {
       /* dynamicSortMultiple function body comes here */
    }
    function _dynamicSort(property) {
        /* dynamicSort function body comes here */
    }
    Array.prototype.sortBy = function() {
        return this.sort(_dynamicSortMultiple.apply(null, arguments));
    }
}();

The Proper Way Of Adding It To The Prototype

If you're targeting IE v9.0 and up then, as I previously mentioned, use Object.defineProperty like this (working example):

//Won't work below IE9, but totally safe otherwise
!function() {
    function _dynamicSortMultiple(attr) {
       /* dynamicSortMultiple function body comes here */
    }
    function _dynamicSort(property) {
        /* dynamicSort function body comes here */
    }
    Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, "sortBy", {
        enumerable: false,
        writable: true,
        value: function() {
            return this.sort(_dynamicSortMultiple.apply(null, arguments));
        }
    });
}();

All those prototype fun enables this:

People.sortBy("Name", "-Surname");

You Should Read This

If you use the direct prototype access method (Object.defineProperty is fine) and other code does not check hasOwnProperty, kittens die! Ok, to be honest, no harm comes to any kitten really but probably things will break and every other developer in your team will hate you:

evil

See that last "SortBy"? Yeah. Not cool. Use Object.defineProperty where you can, and leave the Array.prototype alone otherwise.

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Please note that property names in JavaScript can be any string and if you have properties starting with a "-" (extremely unlikely and probably not a good idea), you'll need to modify the dynamicSort function to use something else as a reverse sort indicator. –  Ege Özcan Jan 10 '13 at 15:18
    
Thats what i was looking for. thanks buddy –  maverickosama92 2 days ago
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underscore.js

use underscore, its small and awesome...

sortBy_.sortBy(list, iterator, [context]) Returns a sorted copy of list, ranked in ascending order by the results of running each value through iterator. Iterator may also be the string name of the property to sort by (eg. length).

var objs = [ { first_nom: 'Lazslo',last_nom: 'Jamf' },
        { first_nom: 'Pig', last_nom: 'Bodine'  },
        { first_nom: 'Pirate', last_nom: 'Prentice' }
       ];

var sortedObjs = _.sortBy( objs, 'first_nom' );
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3  
David, could you edit the answer to say, var sortedObjs = _.sortBy( objs, 'first_nom' );. objs will not be sorted itself as a result of this. The function will return a sorted array. That would make it more explicit. –  Jess Jan 9 at 4:01
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Instead of using a custom comparison function, you could also create an object type with custom toString() method (which is invoked by the default comparison function):

function Person(firstName, lastName) {
    this.firtName = firstName;
    this.lastName = lastName;
}

Person.prototype.toString = function() {
    return this.lastName + ', ' + this.firstName;
}

var persons = [ new Person('Lazslo', 'Jamf'), ...]
persons.sort();
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If you have duplicate last names you might sort those by first name-

obj.sort(function(a,b){
  if(a.last_nom< b.last_nom) return -1;
  if(a.last_nom >b.last_nom) return 1;
  if(a.first_nom< b.first_nom) return -1;
  if(a.first_nom >b.first_nom) return 1;
  return 0;
}
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Don't get why people make it so complicated:

array.sort(function(a, b){
  return a.last_nom > b.last_nom;
});

Swap the operator to have it sorted by reverse alphabetical order.

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Simple and quick solution to this problem using prototype inheritance.

Solution

Array.prototype.sortByProp = function(p){
 return this.sort(function(a,b){
  return (a[p] > b[p]) ? 1 : (a[p] < b[p]) ? -1 : 0;
 });
}

Example / Usage

objs = [{age:44,name:'vinay'},{age:24,name:'deepak'},{age:74,name:'suresh'}];

objs.sortByProp('age');
// Returns
// [{"age":24,"name":"deepak"},{"age":44,"name":"vinay"},{"age":74,"name":"suresh"}]

objs.sortByProp('name');
// Returns
// [{"age":24,"name":"deepak"},{"age":74,"name":"suresh"},{"age":44,"name":"vinay"}]
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2  
It dosn't just return another array. but actually sorts the original one!. –  Vinay Aggarwal Jul 21 '12 at 5:43
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additional desc params for Ege Özcan code

function dynamicSort(property, desc) {
    if (desc) {
        return function (a, b) {
            return (a[property] > b[property]) ? -1 : (a[property] < b[property]) ? 1 : 0;
        }   
    }
    return function (a, b) {
        return (a[property] < b[property]) ? -1 : (a[property] > b[property]) ? 1 : 0;
    }
}
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Combining Ege's dynamic solution with Vinay's idea, you get a nice robust solution:

Array.prototype.sortBy = function() {
    function _sortByAttr(attr) {
        var sortOrder = 1;
        if (attr[0] == "-") {
            sortOrder = -1;
            attr = attr.substr(1);
        }
        return function(a, b) {
            var result = (a[attr] < b[attr]) ? -1 : (a[attr] > b[attr]) ? 1 : 0;
            return result * sortOrder;
        }
    }
    function _getSortFunc() {
        if (arguments.length == 0) {
            throw "Zero length arguments not allowed for Array.sortBy()";
        }
        var args = arguments;
        return function(a, b) {
            for (var result = 0, i = 0; result == 0 && i < args.length; i++) {
                result = _sortByAttr(args[i])(a, b);
            }
            return result;
        }
    }
    return this.sort(_getSortFunc.apply(null, arguments));
}

Usage:

// Utility for printing objects
Array.prototype.print = function(title) {
    console.log("************************************************************************");
    console.log("**** "+title);
    console.log("************************************************************************");
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        console.log("Name: "+this[i].FirstName, this[i].LastName, "Age: "+this[i].Age);
    }
}

// Setup sample data
var arrObj = [
    {FirstName: "Zach", LastName: "Emergency", Age: 35},
    {FirstName: "Nancy", LastName: "Nurse", Age: 27},
    {FirstName: "Ethel", LastName: "Emergency", Age: 42},
    {FirstName: "Nina", LastName: "Nurse", Age: 48},
    {FirstName: "Anthony", LastName: "Emergency", Age: 44},
    {FirstName: "Nina", LastName: "Nurse", Age: 32},
    {FirstName: "Ed", LastName: "Emergency", Age: 28},
    {FirstName: "Peter", LastName: "Physician", Age: 58},
    {FirstName: "Al", LastName: "Emergency", Age: 51},
    {FirstName: "Ruth", LastName: "Registration", Age: 62},
    {FirstName: "Ed", LastName: "Emergency", Age: 38},
    {FirstName: "Tammy", LastName: "Triage", Age: 29},
    {FirstName: "Alan", LastName: "Emergency", Age: 60},
    {FirstName: "Nina", LastName: "Nurse", Age: 54}
];

//Unit Tests
arrObj.sortBy("LastName").print("LastName Ascending");
arrObj.sortBy("-LastName").print("LastName Descending");
arrObj.sortBy("LastName", "FirstName", "-Age").print("LastName Ascending, FirstName Ascending, Age Descending");
arrObj.sortBy("-FirstName", "Age").print("FirstName Descending, Age Ascending");
arrObj.sortBy("-Age").print("Age Descending");
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1  
Thanks for the idea! By the way, please do not encourage people to change the Array Prototype (see the warning at the end of my example). –  Ege Özcan May 10 '13 at 14:51
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This script allows you to do just that unless you want to write your own comparison function or sorter:

http://www.thomasfrank.se/sorting_things.html

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You may need to convert them to the lower case in order to prevent from confusion.

objs.sort(function (a,b) {

var nameA=a.last_nom.toLowerCase(), nameB=b.last_nom.toLowerCase()

if (nameA < nameB)
  return -1;
if (nameA > nameB)
  return 1;
return 0;  //no sorting

})
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