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I have two tables Test1 and Corr_table

Test1 table create script:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Test1](
    [id] [bigint] NOT NULL,
    [Country] [varchar](3) NULL,
    [PeriodKey] [varchar](max) NULL,
    [a] [varchar](3) NULL,
    [b] [varchar](3) NULL,
    [c] [varchar](3) NULL
) 

Test1 data:

id  Country  PeriodKey  a   b   c
1   E      201201   1   5   9
1   E      201202   1   5   9
3   G      201203   3   7   11
4   H      201204   4   8   12

Corr_table create script:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[corr_table](
    [Country] [varchar](5) NULL,
    [id] [bigint] NULL,
    [Field] [varchar](10) NULL,
    [Value] [varchar](50) NULL,
    [Start_date] [varchar](50) NULL,
    [End_date] [varchar](50) NULL
) 

corr_table data:

Country     id  Field   Value   Start_date  End_date
E            1  a   4       201201  201202
E            1  b   6       201201  201202

Now, if I write this query,

select
    a = case when x.Field = 'a' then x.value else a end,
    b = case when x.Field = 'b' then x.value else b end,
    y.*
from 
    dbo.Test1 y,dbo.corr_table x
where  
     y.id = 1
     and y.Country = 'E'
     and y.PeriodKey in (201201)

It gives following result:

a   b   id  Country  PeriodKey  a   b   c
4   5   1   E    201201         1   5   9
1   6   1   E    201201         1   5   9

whereas i am expecting the below result:

a   b   id    Country   PeriodKey   a   b   c
4   6   1   E    201201         1   5   9

Why both columns is not updated in a single row? At once it’s updating only one column but should be updating both column

i.e a should be 4, b should be 6 in a single row . But only updating one, why is that ?

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10  
For one, you're not joining your tables at all - you're just creating a cartesian product - is that really want you want? Also, you should stop using the old-style JOIN syntax which can lead to errors like this - forgetting to provide any JOIN condition and thus creating a cartesian product –  marc_s Jul 2 '12 at 11:31
1  
Can you show what result you expect? –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 2 '12 at 12:00
    
Can you explain your WHERE condition? I don't understand the filter criteria. –  Iain Elder Jul 2 '12 at 14:07
    
here i am updating table test1 fields a, b with two cases and with where condition i am selecting id, country and periodkey is same as corr_table, actually i wrote update statement at first writing sequentially three cases but in different periods different cases are updated and at a times two columns are not updated, so i wanted to know why is this happening? –  MSU Jul 2 '12 at 15:00

2 Answers 2

To make @marc_s's comment more explicit, the resultant SQL would look like this:

select
    a = case when x.Field = 'a' then x.value else a end,
    b = case when x.Field = 'b' then x.value else b end,
    y.*
from 
    dbo.Test1 y
    INNER JOIN dbo.corr_table x ON y.Country = x.Country
where  
     y.id = 1
     and y.Country = 'E'
     and y.PeriodKey in (201201)

Also, your data model should be a little more explicit in its column names so that the relationship structure is obvious - I had to guess at the join condition.

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should the id field be part of the join? –  Sean Jul 2 '12 at 13:07
    
I don't think @MSU is trying to do a join - I think he's trying to do some kind of pivot. –  podiluska Jul 2 '12 at 13:21
    
Hence @AaronBertrand's comment... the expected results definitely need clarification before we can answer the question fully. I only "answered" it to show the SQL clearly. –  jonnyGold Jul 2 '12 at 13:27

Why your query returns two rows

To understand why your query returns two rows instead of the one you expect, it helps to understand the logical steps that SQL Server theoretically takes when executing your query.

The first logical step is to process the FROM clause. Your query specifies a cross join between the two tables dbo.Test1 and dbo.corr_table to produce an intermediate virtual table (let's call it V1) containing 8 rows:

ID  COUNTRY PERIODKEY   A   B   C   FIELD   VALUE   START_DATE  END_DATE
1   E   201201  1   5   9   a   4   201201  201202
1   E   201202  1   5   9   a   4   201201  201202
3   G   201203  3   7   11  a   4   201201  201202
4   H   201204  4   8   12  a   4   201201  201202
1   E   201201  1   5   9   b   6   201201  201202
1   E   201202  1   5   9   b   6   201201  201202
3   G   201203  3   7   11  b   6   201201  201202
4   H   201204  4   8   12  b   6   201201  201202

The second logical step is to process the WHERE clause. Your query specifies that only rows with an ID of 1, a Country of 'E', and a PeriodKey of 201201 should pass. Two rows in the intermediate table meet this condition to populate another intermediate table (let's call it V2):

ID  COUNTRY PERIODKEY   A   B   C   FIELD   VALUE   START_DATE  END_DATE
1   E   201201  1   5   9   a   4   201201  201202
1   E   201201  1   5   9   b   6   201201  201202

The third and final logical step is to process the SELECT clause. Your query specifies that two new columns a and b should be computed based on values in existing columns, and that all the columns from table dbo.Test1 should be returned unmodified. The SELECT clause is basically a list of columns that defines the structure of the result set. It does not control how many rows are in the result set. This intermediate table (let's call it V3) is the same as the result set:

a   b   id  Country  PeriodKey  a   b   c
4   5   1   E    201201         1   5   9
1   6   1   E    201201         1   5   9

The two rows in V2 both contain elements of the single row that you expect to see in your result set. All the columns from the base table dbo.Test1 contain the same value, because the values in these columns were copied from just one row in dbo.Test1. The values in the first columns a and b are copied from two different rows in dbo.corr_table.

If we were able to group these two rows in V2 together, we could make one row that matches our expectations. Fortunately, we can express this easily in SQL.

How to produce your expected result set

In SQL, A SELECT statement has the GROUP BY clause that groups multiple rows into one row that represents the group. Logically, it is processed after the WHERE clause and before the SELECT clause.

To your query I added a GROUP BY clause and invoked an aggregate function for each of the computed columns. This query produces your expected result:

SELECT
  MAX(
    CASE
      WHEN dbo.corr_table.Field = 'a'
      THEN dbo.corr_table.Value
    END
  ) AS corr_a,
  MAX(
    CASE
      WHEN dbo.corr_table.Field = 'b'
      THEN dbo.corr_table.Value
    END
  ) AS corr_b,
  dbo.Test1.*
FROM dbo.Test1
INNER JOIN dbo.corr_table ON
  dbo.Test1.id = dbo.corr_table.id
WHERE
  dbo.Test1.id = 1
  and dbo.Test1.Country = 'E'
  and dbo.Test1.PeriodKey in (201201)
GROUP BY
  dbo.Test1.id,
  dbo.Test1.Country,
  dbo.Test1.PeriodKey,
  dbo.Test1.a,
  dbo.Test1.b,
  dbo.Test1.c;

I have no more time to explain just now, but I will expand my answer later with an explanation of why this works. For now, I recommend that you read about logical query processing and the SELECT statement. Itzik Ben-Gan published a helpful PDF flow chart explaining the logical steps. It is reproduced as an image below, copied from sqlwithmanoj.wordpress.com:

enter image description here

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