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I have a class that holds a few vectors, I'm not sure which method is the best but when the I call the destructor they should be deleted from memory.

HEADER:

class Test
{
public:
    Test();
    ~Test();

    void AddString(char* text);
    void AddString(string text);

private:
    char * StringToCharPointer(string value);

    vector<char*> *pVector;
}

CPP File:

Test::Test()
{
};

Test::~Test()
{
    vector<char*>::iterator i;

    for ( i = pVector->begin() ; i < pVector->end(); i++ )
    {
        delete * i;
    }

    delete pVector;
};

char * Test::StringToCharPointer(string value)
{
    char *pChar = new char[value.length()];
    strcpy(pChar, value.c_str());

    return pChar;
};

Test::AddString(char* text)
{
    pVector->push_back(text);
};

Test::AddString(string text)
{
    pVector->push_back(StringToCharPointer(text));
};

so here's pretty much all the methods that I use, but what's wrong?

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2  
How you are putting data into vector? looks like those char*s are not allocated using new. –  Naveen Jul 2 '12 at 11:21
    
are you creating a vector with "new vector" in the constructor in the first variant and initializing it with either valid data or null pointers? –  bobah Jul 2 '12 at 11:22
    
While I have vector<char*> vector I never called a constructor on it and it stored values, tried doing it for pVector by: vector<char*> vector = new vector<char*>(); pVector = &vector; not working though.. –  Deukalion Jul 2 '12 at 11:24
    
@Deukalion: Can you post some compilable come from your editor? –  Naveen Jul 2 '12 at 11:27
    
This works: vector<char*> vector1; vector<char*> * pVector = &vector1; but when I try to assign the same thing to the pointer in the class that I have in the class, private block it gives me an error. –  Deukalion Jul 2 '12 at 11:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Firstly, i is an iterator on the vector, it is not the pointer stored in the vector. *i is the pointer stored in the vector, so if you're going to delete anything it should be that.

Secondly, delete *i is only valid if the object pointed to by *i was allocated with new. Not new[], not malloc, and it doesn't point to a string literal. Since you don't say how your data was allocated, it is not possible for us to say whether or not you are freeing it correctly.

It seems likely that you should use a std::vector<std::string>.

Update for updated question:

HEADER:

class Test
{
public:
    Test();
    ~Test();

    void AddString(const string &text);
private:
    vector<string> mVector;
};

CPP file:

Test::Test()
{
};

Test::~Test()
{
};

void Test::AddString(const string &text)
{
    mVector.push_back(text);
};
share|improve this answer
    
I had a vector<std::string> earlier, changed it to char* to make the memory allocation smaller. but in my class, private block I have a couple of vector<char*> or vector<string>, I never had to call "new vector<string>()" before to be able to use push_back() on the vectors. So how am I suppose to do it? –  Deukalion Jul 2 '12 at 11:32
    
@Deukalion: sorry, I don't understand your question. How are you supposed to do what? –  Steve Jessop Jul 2 '12 at 11:33
    
I meant I never had to call new on the vector before to allocate it's size or anything. There must be someway to have a pointer to a vector of pointers and to delete it. That's pretty much what I want, my understanding how to do it is just wrong. –  Deukalion Jul 2 '12 at 11:36
    
@Deukalion: if you want a pointer to a vector of pointers, and if you want to delete those pointers, then your destructor code is correct other than the i vs *i thing. The fact that you are getting errors is because of some problem with what you're putting into the vector, in code that you do not show. –  Steve Jessop Jul 2 '12 at 11:37
    
I just edited my post and put pretty much all the code for this in post, so tell me where I forgot to put new at. –  Deukalion Jul 2 '12 at 11:49

Your destruction code looks fine (although I guess you meant delete *i; in the second snippet, since otherwise, ti wouldn't have even compiled.

However, the errors you are getting indicate you put bad things in your vectors. The only char*s that can be inserted in the vector with such destruction code are the ones returned by new char. Especially, you must not insert literals ("abc") or strings that are made as parts of other strings (strtok(NULL, ":"), strchr(str, ':') into it.

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Or arrays allocated with new char[some_size]; –  Steve Jessop Jul 2 '12 at 11:31
    
...but I need it to store dynamic data. Not a fixed size array. –  Deukalion Jul 2 '12 at 11:34
1  
@Deukalion: You need to read a C++ book, it is not possible to write correct C++ code by guessing. That may be possible in some languages, but C++ isn't one of them. delete goes with new, and delete[] goes with new[]. –  Steve Jessop Jul 2 '12 at 11:36
    
I'm not unfamiliar with programmering, just unfamiliar with pointers and how to manage them and delete them. I just haven't used them as much. Since this works, but it doesn't work in a class scope I have no idea what's wrong: vector<char*> vector1; vector<char*> * pVector = &vector1; pVector->push_back(StringToCharPointer("test")); –  Deukalion Jul 2 '12 at 11:42

What about change to vector<vector<char> > * pVector; ? Then you would not need this part at all:

vector<char*>::iterator i;

for ( i = vector.begin() ; i < vector.end(); i++ )
{
    delete i;
}

For adding/getting strings to your vector use this method:

inline void add_string(vector<vector<char> > * pVector, const char* str)
{
   pVector->push_back(vector<char>());
   pVector->back().assign(str, str + strlen(str) + 1);
}
inline const char* get_string(vector<vector<char> > * pVector, int idx)
{
   return &(*pVector)[idx][0];
}

Of course, I would use vector<string> - but if you insist to have char* - this is the way...

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This is one obvious problem: char *pChar = new char[value.length()];. You are doing new[] but doing delete in destructor which invoked undefined behavior. You should use delete[] to delete those pointers. But using delete[] might give problems for Test::AddString(char* text) method as you can not be sure how memory for text is allocated i.e. using new or new[] or malloc. The simplest way is to use std::vector<std::string> as suggested by Steve Jossep.

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It seems likely that you should use a std::vector<std::string>, to shorten the wise words of Steve Jessop.

To elaborate a little more: you say you want "to make the memory allocation smaller", but sounds like you're at the wrong path if you don't know pointers, and correct me if I'm wrong in guessing premature optimization (usually the case with inexperienced developers in this type of question).

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