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I have the code:

class Vector3D : public Vector{
protected:
    Point3D * start;
    Point3D * end;

public:
    ~Vector3D(){delete start; delete end;}
    Vector3D(Point3D * start, Point3D * endOrLength, bool fromLength){
        this->start = start;
        if(fromLength){
            this->end = new Vector3D(*start+*endOrLength); //the operator '+' is defined but I won't put it here,
            //because it's not important now
        }else
            this->end = endOrLength;
    }

    Point3D * getStart(){return start;}
    Point3D * getEnd(){return end;}
};

Now, I have the code:

Vector3D v(new Point3D(1,2,3), new Point3D(2,3,4), 0); //FIRST CREATION
Vector3D v(new Point3D(1,2,3), new Point3D(1,1,1), 1); //SECOND CREATION

First and Second creation give me the same Vector3D, but I think it may produce memory leaks.

It's a true? And how to solve it? I guess it's not elegant to make it that way:

...
if(fromLength){
    this->end = new Vector3D(*start+*endOrLength);
    delete endOrLength;
}else
...

Maybe it's better to put const Point3D &endOrLenght, I don't know what would be a good mannier? The same with getStart/getEnd - should it return pointer:

Point3D * getStart(){return start;}

or just the variable:

Point3D getStart()(return *start)

?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You code here may not be the best way of handling this, but to directly fix your problem:

Vector3D(Point3D * start, Point3D * endOrLength, bool fromLength){
    this->start = start;
    if(fromLength){
        this->end = new Vector3D(*start+*endOrLength); // I think you mean to use endOrLength here and not length.
        if (endOrLength)
            delete endOrLength;
    }else
        this->end = endOrLength;
}

I think a better solution to your problem is to use smart pointers, and the best solution is to see if you can replace pointers.

class Vector3D : public Vector
{
protected:
    Point3D _start;
    Point3D _end;

public:
    Vector3D(const Point3D& start, const Point3D& endOrLength, bool fromLength) :
    _start(start),
    _end(fromLength ? Vector3D(start + endOrLength) : endOrLength)
    {
    }

    const Point3D& getStart() const { return _start; }
    const Point3D& getEnd() const { return _end; }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that would fix the problem with the code, but as you said, my code isn't the best way. –  PolGraphic Jul 2 '12 at 11:55
1  
@PolGraphic I updated my answer, but I'm not sure if you can use it. –  Jeffery Thomas Jul 2 '12 at 11:59
    
Yes, that's it! Thank you :-) –  PolGraphic Jul 2 '12 at 12:02

First of all I would not dynamically allocate value objects like a 3d point. Just use values this might save you a lot of trouble. Second, if you have two ways to construct your vector, simply provide two different constructors:

class Vector3D {
public:
    Vector3D( const Point3D& s, const Point3D& e )
      : start( s )
      , end( e )
    {
    }

    Vector3D( const Point3D& s, const Vector3D& v )
      : start( s )
      , end( s + v )
    {
    }
}
private:
    Point3D start;
    Point3D end;
};

Having a function that does two different things depending on a function parameter is even hard to understand from the calling side. Simply hard to remember what this last 1 or 0 was good for.

kind regards, Torsten

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot :-) –  PolGraphic Jul 2 '12 at 11:53

I think the correct way is:

Vector3D(const Point3D& start, const Point3D& endOrLength, bool fromLength)

That way, there's no ambiguity to ownership. Also, the members should probably not be pointers, or else this might lead to dangling pointers, but rather data members.

Or even better, smart pointers.

If you use smart pointers, you can return a smart pointer from the get function.

share|improve this answer
    
And use Point3D getStart() { return start; } as return indeed. Or perhaps make it a Point3D& if you have an older compiler (or even make it const Point3D& when you want to be sure that the point musn't be changed) –  Sander Jul 2 '12 at 11:50
1  
the application will be imo nicer and simpler if something basic as a point can be passed around by value, not as a shared_ptr –  stijn Jul 2 '12 at 11:51
    
I see, I will use const & –  PolGraphic Jul 2 '12 at 11:54

Your design can be less efficient as it may seem, since it tends by its very nature (every element leaves as isolated) to violate locality on operations. Copy between things that are together can be far more efficient than operation on dereference of sparce things.

And since your vector is just .... 2*3 numbers, avoid all the complication of dynamic memory and just use normal value semantics.

If you reach object with bigger sizes (like 3d projection matrixes, that may have up to 16 coefficient), consider the idea to handle the dynamic memory only to the internal of a class. In your case this can be as

class Vector3d
{
    struct data
    { Point3d start, end; };

    Vector3d() :dp(new data) {}
    Vector3d(const Point3d& a, const Point3d& b) :p(new data({a,b})) {}

    Vector3d(const Vector3d& a) :p(new data(*a.p)) {}
    Vector3d(Vector3d&& a) :p(a.p) { a.p=nullptr; }
    Vector3d& operator=(Vector3d a) { delete p; p=a.p; a.p=nullptr; return *this; }
    ~Vector3d() { delete p; }

    const Poin3d& start() const { return p->start; }
    const Poin3d& end() const { return p->end; }

    //here define the compound assignment arithmetic
    //e.g.:
    Vector3d& operator+=(const Point3d& ofst)
    { p->start += ofst; p->end += ofst; return *this; }

    //alternativelly you can define assign in term of arithmetic
    Vector3d& operator-=(const Poinr3d& ofst)
    { *this = *this - ofst; return *this; } //will create a temporary that will be moved

private:
    data* p;
};

//and here define the point3d, vectopr3d and mixed arithmetic
//e.g.:
Vector3d operator+(Vector3d a, const Point3d& s)
{ a += s; return std::move(a); }

//this follow the alternative example
Vector3d operator-(const Vecotr3d& a, const Point3d& s)
{ return Vector3d(a.start()-s, a.end()-s); }

In this way all the management of dynamic memory as well as generation of copyes (where needed) or moves (where possible) are left into the class. Everything else works with standard value semantics.

NOTE: I assumed Poin3d has += -= + and - defined ....

share|improve this answer
    
That's a great idea. I'm sorry I can mark only one respond as a 'accepted anserw'. Fortunately, I can vote for useful anserw :-) –  PolGraphic Jul 2 '12 at 12:26
    
If using c++11 I would suggest completely avoiding manual memory managment and just using std::unique_ptr instead. Makes copy/move-constructors/destructors/assignment ops even simpler (and easier to get exception safety right). The only exception to that would be if space or runtime are extremely critical, but in that case its probably best to avoid dynamic memory allocation on a per object basis anyways (e.g. use a pool of perallocated data-objects instead). –  Grizzly Jul 2 '12 at 13:08
    
@Grizzly: The difference is that unique_ptr can take a "deleter", hence it needs to add further memory to store ate least one more run-time pointer to a polymorphic internal object. Good implementations may avoid this if no deleter is given. About pooling, since data can be needed and no more needed at any time, you have to manage the pools, let every data (or data owner) to know what pool thay belongs, and you have to track what data inside th poo are in use or can be reused. This can take globally more space and -in fact- ends-up in replicating ... (follows) –  Emilio Garavaglia Jul 2 '12 at 18:58
    
@Grizzly: ... the functionality new/delete already use when acting against the OS. Memory pooling is a good idea, but most CRT implementations already have it inside themselves. –  Emilio Garavaglia Jul 2 '12 at 19:00
    
@EmilioGaravaglia: Since std::unique_ptr takes the deleter type as template parameter it typically doesn't add a pointer to an polymorphic object , but simply an instance of the deletertype (typically a functor without members, so 1byte (+possible padding) and the call will likely be inlined). Considering the recommendation of dynamic allocation for big objects only (and the runtime/space overhead for dynamic memory allocation), that shouldn't typically be a problem. Regarding pooling: As mentioned I only recommend it if runtime/space constraints are extremely tight (so in those cases... –  Grizzly Jul 15 '12 at 20:56

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