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I used the following C code and it gave the output as usual as :

9, 25

#include<stdio.h>
int PRODUCT(int x)
{
  return (x*x);
}

void main()
{
  int i = 3, j, k;
  j = PRODUCT(i++);
  k = PRODUCT(++i);
  printf("%d, %d\n", j,k);
 }

However, when i used the macro definition instead of function as follows:

#include<stdio.h>
#define PRODUCT(x) (x*x)

void main()
{
  int i = 3, j, k;
  j = PRODUCT(i++);
  k = PRODUCT(++i);
  printf("%d, %d\n", j,k);
 }

the output was

9, 49

I tried viewing the compilation code using cpp filename.c and the expansion of main was something like this:

void main()
{
  int i = 3, j, k;
  j = (i++*i++);
  k = (++i*++i);
  printf("%d, %d\n", j,k);
 }

I dont unserstand why the increment operation is being done twice while using macros. I am learning C by myself and i could not figure out the reason why. Thanks in advance for any help!

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2  
possible duplicate of Undefined Behavior and Sequence Points –  RedX Jul 2 '12 at 13:01
4  
OP's question is not about order of operations. It is about macro expansion. –  ArjunShankar Jul 2 '12 at 13:02
1  
Don't think of the macro as a function call - think of it as an expansion via copy/paste. –  Paul Beckingham Jul 2 '12 at 13:02
1  
To the dupe-voters - I think the fundamental issue here is about multiple evaluation of arguments, not sequence points. Now this may be a dupe and I'm looking for such a question, but I don't think we can just say "sequence points" and close this. –  dsolimano Jul 2 '12 at 13:04
1  
Due to undefined behaviour you could have even gotten twice the same result and would be none the wiser, that's why i started with the undefined behaviour duplicate. –  RedX Jul 2 '12 at 13:16
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6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Macros are literally rewriting your source program before compilation. As you show, your code is:

j = (i++*i++);
k = (++i*++i);

See the double ++ in each line? It's incrementing i twice each time. With functions, the argument is evaluated once, so it's incrementing i once each time.

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10  
I think it's worth adding that this expression leads to undefined behavior anyway. –  Blagovest Buyukliev Jul 2 '12 at 13:05
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In macro substitution, the use of the macro is literally replaced with the contents of the macro, before compile.

I would like to give a different example of how this can go horribly wrong when not used properly. Hopefully, this also shows what I (and other answers) meant by 'literally replaced'

You wrote:

#define PRODUCT(x) (x*x)

If you do:

PRODUCT(a + b)

This becomes, after substitution:

(a + b*a + b)

Which is not the same as:

(a+b) * (a+b)
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The increment operation is being done twice because a macro is more or less a textual substitution, as you have discovered. So any macro argument that is used multiple times will be evaluated multiple times.

This SO answer has some tips which can help to avoid that problem.

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The answer is right there in your last example.

void main()
{
  int i = 3, j, k;
  j = (i++*i++);
  k = (++i*++i);
  printf("%d, %d\n", j,k);
 }

Look at it this way:

i = 3, i = 3
3 x 3 = 9

i++ = 4
i++ = 5

++i = 6
++i = 7

7 x 7 = 49.
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After evaluating i++ or ++i, the new value of i will be the same in both cases. The difference between pre-increment and post-increment is in the result of evaluating in the expression.

i++ evaluates to the old value of i, and increments i.

++i increments i and evaluates to the new value of i.

In your code,

j = (i++*i++);

The expression evaluates the old value of i (i.e) 3 and the 1st i++ increments i to 4 and 2nd i++increments i to 5

Your first statement evaluates to

j = 3 * 3;

The resultant j value is 9.

After this statement, the value of i is 5.

Then,

k = (++i*++i);

1st ++i increments i to 6 and 2nd i++increments i to 7 and the expression evaluates the new value of i (i.e) 7.

Your second statement evaluates to

k = 7 * 7;

The resultant k value is 49.

Refer this link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Increment_and_decrement_operators

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It does this because when the preprocessor does macro expansion, you can consider it as if it was doing a text replace before compiling. Every time it sees x, it replaces it with what you put there. So x -> i++ or ++i. That's why the increments happen twice each.

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