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Is there anything wrong or inherently unsafe about the way I've programmed this? I'm still learning threading logic in .NET.

Basically, I had APIManager.ExecuteRequest() being called twice, and it takes a while, so I wanted the two calls to happen concurrently. It looks like the dataResult variables are both suitably populated after the join, but I keep seeing things about AsyncResult and all these other .NET concurrency related APIs and I thought that I probably oversimplified this a little.

If there isn't anything wrong, can someone maybe tell me a better way to get the same result?

MyDataResult dataResult1 = null, dataResult2 = null;

System.Threading.Thread t1 = new System.Threading.Thread(delegate()
    {
        dataResult1 = APIManager.ExecuteRequest(dataRequest1, TBIdentifiers.Text, TBCommands.Lines);
    });

System.Threading.Thread t2 = new System.Threading.Thread(delegate()
    {
        dataResult2 = APIManager.ExecuteRequest(dataRequest2, TBIdentifiers.Text, TBCommands.Lines);
    });

    t1.Start();
    t2.Start();

    t1.Join();
    t2.Join();
share|improve this question
    
Please explain the following comment "but I keep seeing things about AsyncResult and all these other .NET concurrency related APIs and I thought that I probably oversimplified this a little." – Ramhound Jul 2 '12 at 13:15
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This seems OK. Maybe you could optimize this a little by running second request in current thread, instead of having 3 threads where one is only waiting for the other two:

System.Threading.Thread t1 = new System.Threading.Thread(() =>dataResult1 = APIManager.ExecuteRequest(dataRequest1, TBIdentifiers.Text, TBCommands.Lines));

t1.Start();
dataResult2 = APIManager.ExecuteRequest(dataRequest2, TBIdentifiers.Text, TBCommands.Lines);
t1.Join();
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Good point, that was a little silly :) – John Humphreys - w00te Jul 2 '12 at 13:28

Nothing wrong with your approach. Maybe if you wanted to be more "hip" you could use some .NET 4.0 constructs, like Parallel.Invoke, to shorten your code:

Parallel.Invoke(
    () => dataResult1 = APIManager.ExecuteRequest(dataRequest1, TBIdentifiers.Text, TBCommands.Lines),
    () => dataResult2 = APIManager.ExecuteRequest(dataRequest2, TBIdentifiers.Text, TBCommands.Lines)
    );
share|improve this answer
    
Note that Parallel.Invoke doesn't promise that it will actually execute things in parallel, so if the OP always wants it done that way Parallel isn't the way to go. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd992634.aspx – Andy Jul 2 '12 at 13:29
    
+1, very cool! Unfortunately I'm waiting on my MSDN license at work to get a newer copy of VS, I'm still on 3.5 :( I'll switch to this later though! – John Humphreys - w00te Jul 2 '12 at 13:29
    
@Andy: True, the documentation does make this statement, but if you have at least a dual-core CPU and your operations take long enough, they will most likely be executed in parallel on different cores. – Tudor Jul 2 '12 at 13:32
    
Most likely != always, that was all I was trying to make clear. – Andy Jul 2 '12 at 13:37

You can use ParameterizedThreadStart Delegate

public class Request
{
    public Request() {

    public MyDataResult DataResult { get; set; }
    public MyDataRequest DataRequest { get; set; }
}
MyDataResult dataResult1 = null, dataResult2 = null;

public static void ExecuteRequest(object data)
{
    Request req = (Request)data;
    req.DataResult = APIManager.ExecuteRequest(req.DataRequest, 
                                      TBIdentifiers.Text, TBCommands.Lines) 
}

System.Threading.Thread t1 = new System.Threading.Thread(ExecuteRequest);
System.Threading.Thread t2 = new System.Threading.Thread(ExecuteRequest);

t1.Start(new Request{DataResult = dataResult1, DataRequest = dataRequest1});
t2.Start(new Request{DataResult = dataResult2, DataRequest = dataRequest2});

t1.Join();
t2.Join();
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