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The java.util.Date toString() method displays the date in the local time zone.

There are several common scenarios where we want the data to be printed in UTC, including logs, data export and communication with external programs.

  • What's the best way to create a String representation of java.util.Date in UTC?
  • How to replace the j.u.Date’s toString() format, which isn't sortable (thanks, @JonSkeet!) with a better format?

Addendum

I think that the standard way of printing the date in a custom format and time zone is quite tedious:

final Date date = new Date();
final String ISO_FORMAT = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSS zzz";
final SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat(ISO_FORMAT);
final TimeZone utc = TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC");
sdf.setTimeZone(utc);
System.out.println(sdf.format(date));

I was looking for a one-liner like:

System.out.println(prettyPrint(date, "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSS zzz", "UTC"));
share|improve this question
1  
What do you mean by "normal String format"? –  Jon Skeet Jul 2 '12 at 13:07
    
The same format in which Java.Util.Date is printed, "EEE MMM dd hh:mm:ss zzz yyyy", e.g. "Mon Jul 02 16:01:57 IDT 2012". –  Adam Matan Jul 2 '12 at 13:13
3  
Dear downvoters, please be informative. –  Adam Matan Jul 2 '12 at 13:14
1  
That seems like a bad format to use for all the examples you gave. Why not use an extended ISO-8601 representation? (yyyy-MM-ddTHH:mm:ss.SSS) It's locale-independent, sortable, fixed-length, and easier to parse. –  Jon Skeet Jul 2 '12 at 13:38
1  
The default is so poor that I would hope it's rarely used. It's not like it's hard to use SimpleDateFormat to do better. –  Jon Skeet Jul 2 '12 at 14:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Following the useful comments, I've completely rebuilt the date formatter. Usage is supposed to:

  • Be short (one liner)
  • Represent disposable objects (time zone, format) as Strings
  • Support useful, sortable ISO formats and the legacy format from the box

If you consider this code useful, I may publish the source and a JAR in github.

Usage

// The problem - not UTC
Date.toString()                      
"Tue Jul 03 14:54:24 IDT 2012"

// ISO format, now
PrettyDate.now()        
"2012-07-03T11:54:24.256 UTC"

// ISO format, specific date
PrettyDate.toString(new Date())         
"2012-07-03T11:54:24.256 UTC"

// Legacy format, specific date
PrettyDate.toLegacyString(new Date())   
"Tue Jul 03 11:54:24 UTC 2012"

// ISO, specific date and time zone
PrettyDate.toString(moonLandingDate, "yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss zzz", "CST") 
"1969-07-20 03:17:40 CDT"

// Specific format and date
PrettyDate.toString(moonLandingDate, "yyyy-MM-dd")
"1969-07-20"

// ISO, specific date
PrettyDate.toString(moonLandingDate)
"1969-07-20T20:17:40.234 UTC"

// Legacy, specific date
PrettyDate.toLegacyString(moonLandingDate)
"Wed Jul 20 08:17:40 UTC 1969"

Code

(This code is also the subject of a question on Code Review stackexchange)

import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.TimeZone;

/**
 * Formats dates to sortable UTC strings in compliance with ISO-8601.
 * 
 * @author Adam Matan <adam@matan.name>
 * @see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11294307/convert-java-date-to-utc-string/11294308
 */
public class PrettyDate {
    public static String ISO_FORMAT = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSS zzz";
    public static String LEGACY_FORMAT = "EEE MMM dd hh:mm:ss zzz yyyy";
    private static final TimeZone utc = TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC");
    private static final SimpleDateFormat legacyFormatter = new SimpleDateFormat(LEGACY_FORMAT);
    private static final SimpleDateFormat isoFormatter = new SimpleDateFormat(ISO_FORMAT);
    static {
        legacyFormatter.setTimeZone(utc);
        isoFormatter.setTimeZone(utc);
    }

    /**
     * Formats the current time in a sortable ISO-8601 UTC format.
     * 
     * @return Current time in ISO-8601 format, e.g. :
     *         "2012-07-03T07:59:09.206 UTC"
     */
    public static String now() {
        return PrettyDate.toString(new Date());
    }

    /**
     * Formats a given date in a sortable ISO-8601 UTC format.
     * 
     * <pre>
     * <code>
     * final Calendar moonLandingCalendar = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));
     * moonLandingCalendar.set(1969, 7, 20, 20, 18, 0);
     * final Date moonLandingDate = moonLandingCalendar.getTime();
     * System.out.println("UTCDate.toString moon:       " + PrettyDate.toString(moonLandingDate));
     * >>> UTCDate.toString moon:       1969-08-20T20:18:00.209 UTC
     * </code>
     * </pre>
     * 
     * @param date
     *            Valid Date object.
     * @return The given date in ISO-8601 format.
     * 
     */

    public static String toString(final Date date) {
        return isoFormatter.format(date);
    }

    /**
     * Formats a given date in the standard Java Date.toString(), using UTC
     * instead of locale time zone.
     * 
     * <pre>
     * <code>
     * System.out.println(UTCDate.toLegacyString(new Date()));
     * >>> "Tue Jul 03 07:33:57 UTC 2012"
     * </code>
     * </pre>
     * 
     * @param date
     *            Valid Date object.
     * @return The given date in Legacy Date.toString() format, e.g.
     *         "Tue Jul 03 09:34:17 IDT 2012"
     */
    public static String toLegacyString(final Date date) {
        return legacyFormatter.format(date);
    }

    /**
     * Formats a date in any given format at UTC.
     * 
     * <pre>
     * <code>
     * final Calendar moonLandingCalendar = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));
     * moonLandingCalendar.set(1969, 7, 20, 20, 17, 40);
     * final Date moonLandingDate = moonLandingCalendar.getTime();
     * PrettyDate.toString(moonLandingDate, "yyyy-MM-dd")
     * >>> "1969-08-20"
     * </code>
     * </pre>
     * 
     * 
     * @param date
     *            Valid Date object.
     * @param format
     *            String representation of the format, e.g. "yyyy-MM-dd"
     * @return The given date formatted in the given format.
     */
    public static String toString(final Date date, final String format) {
        return toString(date, format, "UTC");
    }

    /**
     * Formats a date at any given format String, at any given Timezone String.
     * 
     * 
     * @param date
     *            Valid Date object
     * @param format
     *            String representation of the format, e.g. "yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm"
     * @param timezone
     *            String representation of the time zone, e.g. "CST"
     * @return The formatted date in the given time zone.
     */
    public static String toString(final Date date, final String format, final String timezone) {
        final TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getTimeZone(timezone);
        final SimpleDateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat(format);
        formatter.setTimeZone(tz);
        return formatter.format(date);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
11  
@Michael-O: That last edit on this post was way out of line, and should have been a comment instead. –  Cerbrus yesterday
5  
@Michael-O: Then leave a comment about that fact and if it's true and of importance in context of the answer your comment will get upvotes so everybody sees it prominently. –  hakre yesterday
6  
It is indeed true that CDT, UDT, etc. are not ISO-8601 timezone specifiers, and that's useful to note. Editing exhortations to downvote into a answer is not useful. –  T.J. Crowder yesterday
4  
Just to be clear, the answer is wrong to claim that datetime strings like "2012-07-03T11:54:24.256 UTC" are in "ISO format" and should be downvoted for that reason. That isn't changed by the fact that @Michael-O went about drawing attention to the error in an objectionable way. Michael, see meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/303570/…, by the way, if you haven't already. –  Mark Amery yesterday
2  
@Michael-O if you know the answer, why don't you post it? –  michael 7 hours ago

Joda-Time

I was looking for a one-liner

Easy if using the Joda-Time 2.3 library. ISO 8601 is the default formatting.

Time Zone

In the code example below, note that I am specifying a time zone rather than depending on the default time zone. In this case, I'm specifying UTC per your question. The Z on the end, spoken as "Zulu", means no time zone offset from UTC.

Example Code

// import org.joda.time.*;

String output = new DateTime( DateTimeZone.UTC );

Output…

2013-12-12T18:29:50.588Z

java.time

In Java 8 and later we have the new java.time package built in (Tutorial). Inspired by Joda-Time, defined by JSR 310, and extended by the ThreeTen-Extra project.

An Instant represents a moment on the timeline, basically in UTC (see class doc for precise details). The toString implementation uses the DateTimeFormatter.ISO_INSTANT format by default. This format includes zero, three, six or nine digits digits as needed to display fraction of a second up to nanosecond precision.

String output = Instant.now().toString(); // Example: '2015-12-03T10:15:30.120Z'

You may want to use an alternate formatter if you need a consistent number of digits in the fractional second or if you need no fractional second.

Another route if you want to truncate fractions of a second is to use ZonedDateTime instead of Instant, calling its method to change the fraction to zero.

Note that we must specify a time zone for ZonedDateTime (thus the name). In our case that means UTC. The subclass of ZoneID, ZoneOffset, holds a convenient constant for UTC. If we omit the time zone, the JVM’s current default time zone is implicitly applied.

String output = ZonedDateTime.now( ZoneOffset.UTC ).withNano( 0 ).toString();  // Example: 2015-08-27T19:28:58Z
share|improve this answer
2  
Down vote with no comment? The question asked for a one-liner outputting date-time in UTC, and I gave one. –  Basil Bourque Jun 10 '14 at 6:01

Why not just use java.text.SimpleDateFormat ?

Date someDate = new Date();
SimpleDateFormat df = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");
String s = df.format(someDate);

Or see: http://www.tutorialspoint.com/java/java_date_time.htm

share|improve this answer

Tried the code. It did not help.Was getting the error-> The method toString() in the type Object is not applicable for the arguments (Date) The earlier piece of code:-

public class GetSync {
public static String ISO_FORMAT = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSS zzz";
private static final TimeZone utc = TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC");
private static final SimpleDateFormat isoFormatter = new SimpleDateFormat(ISO_FORMAT);
static {
    isoFormatter.setTimeZone(utc);
}

public static String now() {
    return GetSync.toString(new Date());
}

Had to modify the code to

   public class GetSync {
       public static String ISO_FORMAT = "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSS zzz";
       private static final TimeZone utc = TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC");
      private static final SimpleDateFormat isoFormatter = new SimpleDateFormat(ISO_FORMAT);
      static {
       isoFormatter.setTimeZone(utc);
     }

      public static String now() {
      return isoFormatter.format(new Date()).toString(); //The modification
   }

Hope this helps somebody.. Cheers,

share|improve this answer

If XStream is a dependency, try:

new com.thoughtworks.xstream.converters.basic.DateConverter().toString(date)
share|improve this answer

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