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I would like to know if there is an existent framework which can manage some "tasks".

I'm aware of Task Parallelism, but (correct me if I'm wrong) I don't think it fits my needs (mostly because it works on a finished list of tasks).

The base of my needs is that I want to give to X threads some work to do.

But:

  • Every task can generate create new tasks to be executed in the future(can be 0 task like it can be 100 tasks
  • If my task list is empty, I would like that my non-working thread wait that all thread have finished their task, maybe I've one last thread running, which will generate 50 new tasks that other 3 threads can handle.

Do you know something which can helps me? Or should I have to manage everything by hands?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

TPL would work by the sound of it. You can create subtasks, and you can use WaitAll to make sure all tasks are completed.

This way you don't have to worry about thread management, either.

Without knowing much more about your code, it seems like it could be something like this pseudocode:

//for loop to create tasks
var task = new Task(()=>Task.Factory.StartNew(()=>dostuff));
taskList.Add(task)
//end for loop

Task.WaitAll(taskList);

UPDATE:

I also forgot that the subtasks need to be marked at inner tasks or else the outer task will not wait. Here is an MSDN on nested tasks and how to work with them. But, in a nutshell, when you create a nested task you have to mark it as attached to the parent task.

TaskCreationOptions.AttachedToParent
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1  
Just be aware that WaitAll() blocks the current thread. And if you do that a lot, it could cause having a lot of threads that don't do any useful work. In C# 5, there is an easy fix: await Task.WhenAll(taskList). –  svick Jul 2 '12 at 13:42
    
Ok, but I've a problem:WaitAll wait only on listed thread, but if I create children thread, the main thread don't wait on them. I know that I can attach them to the parent, but I don't want because I don't need the response. Can we specify somewhere the maximum of task to run in parallel? –  J4N Jul 2 '12 at 13:43
    
@svick Agreed, however you should also be aware that if you go to use any values from that await at a top level method, then await can still block the main thread. I am really nervous about a wave of possibly odd async problems coming from programmers misunderstanding/misusing async and await. At the base level, @svick is right and I agree, I am just noting to make sure any dev understands the mechanics of async/await before throwing them around without thought :) –  Justin Pihony Jul 2 '12 at 13:50
    
Here is what I did to test it: pastebin.com/KA7qQC21 Any idea how to make that the "Run" call returns only when all sub thread have finished their jobs? And is there a way to know how many task have still to be done(something like a progress information? –  J4N Jul 2 '12 at 14:03
1  
No, TPL can handle that also: stackoverflow.com/questions/2898609/… You just set MaxDegreesOfParallelism –  Justin Pihony Jul 2 '12 at 14:43

Take a look at Actor Framework which is well suited for distributed parallel task processing, there is a list of them and here is one of them on .NET

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