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I am having an odd error with Thread.sleep() on Java. For some reason, when I call sleep on some machines, it never returns. I can't figure out what could be causing this behaviour. At first, I thgouth the error might be elsewhere in my code, so I made the simplest possible sleep test:

public class SleepTest {
    public static void main (String [] args) {
        System.out.println ("Before sleep...");
        try {
            Thread.sleep (100);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        }
        System.out.println ("After sleep...");
    }
}

On most machines it works, but on several machines which I am remotely logging into, it pauses indefinitely between the print statements. I have waited up to a half an hour with no change in behaviour. The machines that are displaying this error are Linux machines. Here is some information about the machines:

$ uname -a
Linux zone29ea 2.6.32-220.17.1.el6.x86_64 #1 SMP Tue May 15 17:16:46 CDT 2012 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
$ java -version
java version "1.6.0_22"
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (IcedTea6 1.10.6) (rhel-1.43.1.10.6.el6_2-x86_64)
OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 20.0-b11, mixed mode)

What could be causing this behaviour?

UPDATE

Revised version, which still never ends:

public class SleepTest {
    public static void main (String [] args) {
        new Thread () {
            public void run () {
                System.out.println ("Before sleep...");
                try {
                    Thread.sleep (100);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace ();
                }
                System.out.println ("After sleep...");
            }
        }.start();
    }
}
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2  
did you check if there is an error fired inside your catch ? maybe a printStackTrace? –  Adel Boutros Jul 2 '12 at 13:23
    
could you try that in a seperate thread to make sure that that still occurs? what you are doing is putting the main thread to sleep which could cause the issue –  John Kane Jul 2 '12 at 13:24
1  
Are you sure the problem isn't in the recuperation of the second println (as you do it remotely) ? Maybe a missing flush ? Thread.sleep(100); works even on linux. –  dystroy Jul 2 '12 at 13:25
    
@AdelBoutros I think if there was an error the program would teminate (and print the "after....") –  giorashc Jul 2 '12 at 13:28
    
do you have the possibility to run the code inside a profiler, such as jvisualvm and get some debug info on the matter? –  posdef Jul 2 '12 at 13:34
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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

if your server is running under Linux, you may be hit by the Leap Second bug which appears last week-end.

This bug affects the Linux kernel (the Thread management), so application which uses threads (as the JVM, mysql etc...) may consume high load of CPU.

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No, the leap second was added in the last minute of the last hour of the last day of June. But the NTP process of you server may have a problem. Rebooting may solve the problem. –  Jean-Philippe Briend Jul 2 '12 at 13:30
    
I'll look into this. The error did start after July 1 and these machines use NTP. –  101100 Jul 2 '12 at 13:34
    
So the bug is a really good candidate. Rebooting the servers should solve your issue. –  Jean-Philippe Briend Jul 2 '12 at 13:38
    
I was able to get physical access to reboot the machines today and that solved the problem. –  101100 Jul 3 '12 at 14:59
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If your servers uses NTP (as you mentioned) and your CPU usage goes to 100%, check for Clock: inserting leap second 23:59:60 UTC in your dmesg:, if you find that, you are sure that your server affected with Leap Second bug, unfortunately Java is the one which is most effected.

To resolve this, with out restarting any servers (like, tomcat) run the following commands.

/etc/init.d/ntp stop
date `date +"%m%d%H%M%C%y.%S"` 

Hope this helps..

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Unfortunately, I didn't have root access to try this solution. –  101100 Jul 3 '12 at 15:00
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This does seem to be leap second related.

Based on a post at from https://lkml.org/lkml/2012/7/1/19, I did:

date -s "`date`"

and it fixed the problem for me

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