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I'm semi new to c++. I have tried everything but couldn't solve my problem. Just for some background: I'm using the Botan library for encryption. I don't think this problem has anything to do with the library, but more with pointers and objects.

When I use the following code, there are no problems. The comments after each line explains what happens. (The code is for explanation purposes only)

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    DH_PrivateKey *Apriv = 0; // Apriv points to 0x00
    MemoryVector<unsigned char> *Apub = 0; // Irrelevant for now
    AutoSeeded_RNG rng; // Irrelevant object
    DL_Group domain("modp/ietf/3072"); // Irrelevant object
    Apriv = new DH_PrivateKey(rng,domain); // Apriv points to 0x8079098

The main observation here is that an object is instantiated and Apriv points to that object. This is what I want to happen. The problem comes in when I try to do this in another function which I pass the Apriv pointer to.

My main code changes to the following:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{   
    DH_PrivateKey *Apriv = 0;
    MemoryVector<unsigned char> *Apub = 0;
    AutoSeeded_RNG rng;
    DL_Group domain("modp/ietf/3072");
    encryption::dh_generatekeys("modp/ietf/3072",Apriv,Apub); //Passing pointers

And the function I pass these pointers to looks like this:

void encryptionalgorithm::dh_generatekeys(string shareddomain,DH_PrivateKey *privatekey,MemoryVector<unsigned char> *publickey)
{
    AutoSeeded_RNG rng; // Irrelevant
    DL_Group shared_domain(shareddomain); // Irrelevant
    privatekey = new DH_PrivateKey(rng, shared_domain); //[PROBLEM 1]
    MemoryVector<unsigned char> pubkey = privatekey->public_value();
    publickey = &pubkey;[PROBLEM 2]

I will now describe the problems:

Problem 1: The privatekey pointer still points to 0x00, it does not point to the newly instantiated object, and this later causes segmentation errors. Problem 2: The same with publickey, when I create "pubkey" on the stack and then point publickey pointer to its address, publickey just stays 0x00.

Any help would be appreciated. I hope it is something simple!

Thanks guys.

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4 Answers 4

Your parameters are passed by value.

This means, if you modify the value of the pointer privatekey inside a function, you only modify a variable local to that function.

You might want to change your function signature to accept parameters as references instead:

void generatekeys(Something *& Apub, Something *& Apriv) { ... }

This reads right-to-left: Apub is a reference & to a pointer * to Something. Now any changes to Apub and Apriv inside generatekeys will propagate to the outside as you want, but note that you'll need to call that function passing proper variables (lvalues), not just some expressions (rvalues).

If in doubt, ask further or have a google for reference parameters.

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Thank you, this makes sense. I wasn't aware that pointers can be passed as local values as well. –  user1437078 Jul 2 '12 at 13:46
    
Tough coming from java/c# environment where everything is done for you =\ –  user1437078 Jul 2 '12 at 13:49
1  
Java is strictly pass-by-value, so you couldn't do this there. This is analogous to C#'s ref parameter. –  Kos Jul 2 '12 at 13:52

Your problem is that dh_generatekeys takes both privatekey and publickey by value (that is the value of the pointer). Therefore what you modify are local copies of the pointers, instead of the pointers instead. The solution is simply to either pass a pointer or a reference to the pointer to your object, so:

void encryptionalgorithm::dh_generatekeys(string shareddomain,DH_PrivateKey** privatekey, MemoryVector<unsigned char>** publickey)

or

void encryptionalgorithm::dh_generatekeys(string shareddomain,DH_PrivateKey*& privatekey, MemoryVector<unsigned char>*& publickey)
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If I understand correctly, yo ushould change dh_generatekeys to:

void encryptionalgorithm::dh_generatekeys(string shareddomain,DH_PrivateKey* &privatekey,MemoryVector<unsigned char>* &publickey) { ... }

That is to say use references to pointers. This way you can change them.

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You need to pass the address of the pointers (or a reference) to be able to modify the value in the caller.

Address of pointer (pointer to pointer) example:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{   
    DH_PrivateKey *Apriv = 0;
    MemoryVector<unsigned char> *Apub = 0;
    AutoSeeded_RNG rng;
    DL_Group domain("modp/ietf/3072");
    encryption::dh_generatekeys("modp/ietf/3072",&Apriv,&Apub); //Passing address of pointers
    //...
}

void encryptionalgorithm::dh_generatekeys(string shareddomain,DH_PrivateKey **privatekey,MemoryVector<unsigned char> **publickey)
{
    AutoSeeded_RNG rng; // Irrelevant
    DL_Group shared_domain(shareddomain); // Irrelevant
    *privatekey = new DH_PrivateKey(rng, shared_domain); //dereference to assign
    MemoryVector<unsigned char> pubkey = privatekey->public_value();
    *publickey = &pubkey; //dereference to assign
    //...
}
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