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I was doing research in which I have found out the following:

Let's suppose I have a class like the one below, with the following constructors:

public class Triangle implements Shape {

    public String  type;
    public String height;

    public Triangle(String type) {
        super();
        this.type = type;
    }

    public Triangle(String height) {
        super();
        this.height = height;
    }

    public Triangle(String type, String height) {
        super();
        this.type = type;
        this.height = height;
    }
}

This gives me a compile-time error. But if I change height from String to int everything works fine. Below is the changed piece of code:

public class Triangle implements Shape {

    public String  type;
    public int height;

    public Triangle(String type) {
        super();
        this.type = type;
    }

    public Triangle(int height) {
        super();
        this.height = height;
    }

    public Triangle(String type, int height) {
        super();
        this.type = type;
        this.height = height;
    }
}

Now the question is: Suppose I want String as height as in my first case; why was it failing? Please explain.

share|improve this question
    
may i ask which IDE you use? –  Franz Ebner Jul 2 '12 at 14:15
    
You should always design your class functional - so why is height a String at all? –  Geziefer Jul 2 '12 at 14:16
    
By the way, you don't need to type in the calls to super(), Java will automatically make that call if you don't specify any other constructor call. –  Keppil Jul 2 '12 at 14:23

5 Answers 5

You are not allowed to overload constructor having same signature

Why?

While resolving the method/constructor to invoke JVM needs something uniquely identifying the method (return type is not enough), So parameter to constructor/method must not be the same


See

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3  
This is because when you call new Triangle("yourStringHere"), in your first code java would have no way of knowing which constructor to use. –  paul jerman Jul 2 '12 at 14:29

You have two constructors with identical arguments. They both take one String as an argument.

If I call Triangle tri = new Triangle("blah"); There is no way to tell whether "blah" is supposed to be a height or a type. You may be able to tell by looking at it, but the JVM can't. Each constructor has to have unique arguments.

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@Robers thanks man perfect explnation –  user1493927 Jul 2 '12 at 14:22

The reason for compile error in first case is that, when you'll initialize the object of class Triangle by passing string parameter, how would the compiler know which constructor to invoke; the one which initializes type or the one which initializes height. It is an ambiguous code for the compiler and hence it throws an error. Just like if I say;

Triangle t = new Triangle("xyz");

no one can tell which variable would be initialize; type or height.

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Or you can add static factories for your class

public class Triangle implements Shape {

...

private Triangle(int height) {
  // initialize here
}

private Triangle(String type) {
  // initialize here
}

private Triangle(String type, int height) {
  // initialize here
}

public static createByHeight(String height) {
  return Triangle(Integer.parseInt(height);
}

public static createByType(String type) {
  return Triangle(type);
}

public static createByTypeAndHeight(String type, String height) {
  return Triangle(type, Integer.parseInt(height);
}

}

share|improve this answer

If you wanted to use two Strings for a Constructor, you could turn your strings into Value objects.

http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?ValueObject

For example:

class Height {
   private String height;

   public Height(String height){
       this.height = height;
   }

   public String value(){
       return this.height;
   } 

   @Override
   public String toString(){
      return height;
   }

   @Override
   public boolean equals(Object other){
        return this.height.equals((Height)other).value()); // Let your IDE create this method, this is just an example
       // For example I have missed any null checks
   }
}

Then if you did the same for Type, you could have two constructors:

public Triangle(Type type) {
    this.type = type;
}

public Triangle(Height height) {
    this.height = height;
}

Also Type is sounding like it could be an enum

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