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I have a byte array in little endian byte order. How do I convert it to a long (four bytes) array?

In layman's terms, I want to merge every four bytes.

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Unsafe method is int x = *((int*) &bytearr). Just to show how messed up it is. –  nhahtdh Jul 2 '12 at 14:38
    
The applicable techniques might/will depend on the byte-order the resultant long as well. You said that the input is in little-endian. But what about output? –  AndreyT Jul 2 '12 at 15:25
    
@AndreyT The outbut follows the same little endian byte-order –  frazras Jul 2 '12 at 22:45
    
@frazras: In this case, depending on your performance requirements, you might carefully consider the straightforward approach with simply memcpy-ing the input bytes straight into the recipient long object(s). It won't be portable in general case, but, again, it depends on your requirements. –  AndreyT Jul 3 '12 at 14:19
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1 Answer 1

byte b[4];  // Contains bytes
int x= 0;

x= (x << 8) + b[3];
x= (x << 8) + b[2];
x= (x << 8) + b[1];
x= (x << 8) + b[0];

I quickly wrote a sample. It's not tested, though.

unsigned char b[35];

int sizeOfB = sizeof b / sizeof(unsigned char);

int sizeOfL = sizeOfB / 4;
if(sizeOfB % 4 != 0) ++sizeOfL;
    int lcount=0;

long* l = new long[sizeOfL];

for(int i = 0; i < sizeOfB; i+=4){
    long currentLong = 0;

    if(i + 3 < sizeOfB)
        currentLong = (currentLong << 8) + b[i+3];
    if(i + 2 < sizeOfB)
        currentLong = (currentLong << 8) + b[i+2];
    if(i + 1 < sizeOfB)
        currentLong = (currentLong << 8) + b[i+1];

    currentLong = (currentLong << 8) + b[i+0];

    l[lcount]=currentlong;
    lcount++;
}

// Use l...
delete l;
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1  
+1 for keeping it safe and clean :) –  Kos Jul 2 '12 at 14:35
    
however I'm surprised that my gcc -O3 didn't optimize this to a single instruction –  Kos Jul 2 '12 at 14:37
    
Bad things happen if byte is a signed type. I don't know what (if anything) byte is on Arduino. –  Steve Jessop Jul 2 '12 at 14:40
1  
I can't imagine why you would want to do this anyway if the bytes were signed. –  Daniel Jul 2 '12 at 14:46
1  
@frazras: if they are bytecodes that are being converted to a 32 bit string, then I probably wouldn't go via long (which btw is a signed type, but I wouldn't go via uint32_t either). –  Steve Jessop Jul 2 '12 at 15:44
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