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I have been debating using css with div's and laying out elements, and really am looking to see if the practice i've been using would be considered the best practice, or if there is something different that i'm over looking that would be better.

Lets say we were placing two images on the same line, on on the left one on the right then an text in the ad below it. I might do something like:

#container{
 width:800px;
 height:300px;
}
.fleft{
  float:left;
}
#left_img_container{
  float:left;
  width:150px;
}
#right_img_container{
  float:right;
  width:150px;
  text-align:right;
}
#textArea{
  margin-top:5px;
  width:100%;
}

<div id='container'>
   <div class='fleft'>
       <div id='left_img_container'>FOO IMAGE 1</div>
       <div id='right_img_container'>FOO IMAGE 2</div>
   </div>
   <div class='fleft' id='textArea'>this is my text</div>
</div>

Simple example but illistrates the float kind of layout style. Is this the better practice? or would using clear be better?

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
    
Just noticing that your container is 800px, but your images only 150px each. So if you use float:right, the images would be separated by 500px. If you want them next to eachother use float:left on both images. –  peirix Jul 15 '09 at 5:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

fleft as a class name is not good practice.

What if your client/boss says, "alright, we want that div on the right?"

You have 2 options... change the fleft class to be float: right, or make a new class and change it in the HTML. CSS classes should be titled by their meaning or description without using descriptive words which include position/colour/size etc.

The only exception I've found to the rule are images in an article. Since they generally float to the left and right, I do use class names image-left and image-right.

Examples

(from a bad name to a better name)

top => header

left-side-bar => menu

bottom-menu => footer

Of course, these are only examples. It's also good practice, because when HTML5 comes along, you'll actually define <header>, <footer>, etc

share|improve this answer
    
"What if your client/boss says, "alright, we want that image on the right?" Usually images like that can be given a descriptive class or id instead of a position in the name. –  Rob Apr 23 '10 at 2:49
    
@Rob Not if they are inserted via a CMS. If I do have to give one an id, I'll opt for something that doesn't tie to the image. For example, if you had <img src="big_dog.jpg" id="big-dog" /> and then your boss says "make it a small cat", you'll have more maintenance than you'll want. –  alex Apr 23 '10 at 2:51
    
Actually I meant something along the lines of id="splash-image" or "article-img" or some such. –  Rob Apr 23 '10 at 13:01
    
@Rob it all depends on context. –  alex Apr 27 '10 at 0:46

You can probably clean up your HTML code a bit, and use less classes in your CSS, like so:

<div id="container">
   <img id="foo1" src="foo1" />
   <img id="foo2" src="foo2" />
   <p>This is my text</p>
</div>

#container {
   width:800px;
   height:300px;
}

#foo1 {
   float:left;
}

#foo2 {
   float:right;
}

#container p {
   margin-top:5px;
   clear:both;
}
share|improve this answer

It all depends on the implementation... But I do agree with Alex... You need to follow a more appropriate naming standard.... which would serve you better for the future...

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