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I know .NET has one built-in but it's an external call. Anyone knows why?

But the actual question is how to implement a truncate from scratch where the user will be able to specify how many digits to keep? Is multiplying a number by say 100 and then dividing it by the same amount enough? Or is there a better implementation?

Something like:

Truncate(12.3456789, 3);
// returns 12.345
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5 Answers 5

The classic way:

var x = 1.2345678;
var tr = 4;

var truncated = (int) (x * Math.Pow(10, tr)) / Math.Pow(10, tr);

would give 1.2345;

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Thanks, didn't know you could do it this way. –  Joan Venge Jul 2 '12 at 14:55
    
@JoanVenge You say that, and yet you ask if it's possible in the OP itself. This is simply the implementation of that approach. "Is multiplying a number by say 100 and then dividing it by the same amount enough?" –  Servy Jul 2 '12 at 14:58
    
No it's not. I didn't mention any powers. –  Joan Venge Jul 2 '12 at 15:01
    
@JoanVenge 100 is 10^2, thus it would be used to truncate to 2 decimal places. –  Servy Jul 2 '12 at 15:07
4  
That's what happens when you use poor quality variable names. –  Servy Jul 2 '12 at 15:27

You'd probably want to look at IEEE floating-point integers.

You can then use unsafe code to modify the numbers, like:

unsafe
{
    double* pValue = &value;
    var asLong = *(long*)pValue;
    do whatever you want with asLong, e.g. bit-masking it, etc.; 
}

As to the 'why': I have no idea, though the Shared Source CLI may provide clues. My guess would be that it might be because of performance optimizations.

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Here is how I would do it. In C++, and I think in C# as well, you could get the integer part of a floating point number by casting it to an integer type.

double Truncate (double num, int dig)
{
    if (dig > 15) dig = 15; // Don't overflow
    long p = Math.Pow (10, dig);

    // Save the integer part, so that we don't overflow
    long integer_part = (long)num;

    // Fractional part * 10^dig
    double frac = (num - Convert.ToDouble(integer_part)) * p;
    long frac_trunc = (long)frac;

    // Final result
    double result = Convert.ToDouble(integer_part) + (Convert.ToDouble(frac_trunc) / p);
    return result;
}

Is multiplying a number by say 100 and then dividing it by the same amount enough?

That should work, but be careful because with large numbers, or high number of digits, you can easily overflow, and it will give you weird results.

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you could get the integer part of a floating point number by converting it to an integer type What if it's too large? Does that ever happen? (I haven't checked, just asking.) –  Mehrdad Jul 2 '12 at 15:01
    
According to MSDN, double is 64-bit floating point number (or 15-16 digits), so long should be enough. –  Tibi Jul 2 '12 at 15:05
    
@Mehrdad there is an integer type that is the same number of bytes as each floating point type. It may not always mean using int, it may mean using long. –  Servy Jul 2 '12 at 15:05
    
@Servy: Right, but that's not what I meant. Try unchecked((int)(float)int.MaxValue == int.MaxValue). –  Mehrdad Jul 2 '12 at 15:10
    
@Mehrdad - That line of code makes no sense. If anything he wants to use an double or decmial otherwise he would have a method that would accept even a smaller range of numbers then the default method. –  Ramhound Jul 2 '12 at 15:19
var result = Math.Round(12.3456789, 3);

Math.Round Method (Double, Int32)

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1  
Not quite right. That would round to 12.346. –  Tim S. Jul 2 '12 at 14:40
    
THanks but internally that also calls the same SplitFractionDouble method. –  Joan Venge Jul 2 '12 at 14:40
    
@Ramhound I am not "against" that method, I just want to implement my own. –  Joan Venge Jul 2 '12 at 14:57

It is not clear the reason you think that Truncate should keep the decmial value.

The default method within .NET is described by the following statement:

The integral part of d; that is, the number that remains after any fractional digits have been discarded.

It seems like what you want to use is either to format the output string of an double/decmial value and/or use the Math.Round(double, int) function instead.

You could just use:

double num = 2.22939393; num  = Convert.ToDouble(num.ToString("#0.000")); 

From one of the duplicate questions:

public static decimal TruncateToDecimalPlace(this decimal numberToTruncate, int decimalPlaces) 
{     
       decimal power = (decimal)(Math.Pow(10.0, (double)decimalPlaces));      
       return Math.Truncate((power * numberToTruncate)) / power; 
} 

I understand this still uses the Truncate method. I only provided this code since you wanted a Truncate method that would keep the decmial value of a number and the default built-in Truncate method does not.

You could always just use this:

Math.Round does NOT call the SplitFractionDouble from what I can tell

     private static unsafe double InternalRound(double value, int digits, MidpointRounding mode) {
            if (Abs(value) < doubleRoundLimit) {
                Double power10 = roundPower10Double[digits];
                value *= power10;
                if (mode == MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero) {                
                    double fraction = SplitFractionDouble(&value); 
                    if (Abs(fraction) >= 0.5d) {
                        value += Sign(fraction);
                    }
                }
                else {
                    // On X86 this can be inlined to just a few instructions
                    value = Round(value);
                }
                value /= power10;
            }
            return value;
          }           


     public static double Round(double value, int digits)
      {
           if ((digits < 0) || (digits > maxRoundingDigits))
               throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("digits", Environment.GetResourceString("ArgumentOutOfRange_RoundingDigits"));
           return InternalRound(value, digits, MidpointRounding.ToEven);                     
      }

  public static double Round(double value, MidpointRounding mode) {
         return Round(value, 0, mode);
      }

      public static double Round(double value, int digits, MidpointRounding mode) {
          if ((digits < 0) || (digits > maxRoundingDigits))
              throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("digits", Environment.GetResourceString("ArgumentOutOfRange_RoundingDigits"));
          if (mode < MidpointRounding.ToEven || mode > MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero) {            
              throw new ArgumentException(Environment.GetResourceString("Argument_InvalidEnumValue", mode, "MidpointRounding"), "mode");
          }
          return InternalRound(value, digits, mode);                           
      }

      public static Decimal Round(Decimal d) {
        return Decimal.Round(d,0);
      }

      public static Decimal Round(Decimal d, int decimals) {
        return Decimal.Round(d,decimals);
      }

      public static Decimal Round(Decimal d, MidpointRounding mode) {
        return Decimal.Round(d, 0, mode);
      }

      public static Decimal Round(Decimal d, int decimals, MidpointRounding mode) {
        return Decimal.Round(d, decimals, mode);
      }


public static Decimal Floor(Decimal d) { return Decimal.Floor(d); }

[MethodImplAttribute(MethodImplOptions.InternalCall)] public static extern double Floor(double d);

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