Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

It appears that there is no concept of AUTO_INCREMENT in Oracle, up until and including version 11g.

How can I create a column that behaves like auto increment in Oracle 11g?

share|improve this question
1  
You can create a BEFORE INSERT trigger on the table and pull values out of a sequence to create auto-increment – Hunter McMillen Jul 2 '12 at 15:15
4  
Identity columns are now available in Oracle 12c docs.oracle.com/cd/E16655_01/gateways.121/e22508/… – David Aldridge Oct 9 '13 at 12:54
1  

12 Answers 12

up vote 243 down vote accepted

There is no such thing as "auto_increment" or "identity" columns in Oracle. However, you can model it easily with a sequence and a trigger:

Table definition:

CREATE TABLE departments (
  ID           NUMBER(10)    NOT NULL,
  DESCRIPTION  VARCHAR2(50)  NOT NULL);

ALTER TABLE departments ADD (
  CONSTRAINT dept_pk PRIMARY KEY (ID));

CREATE SEQUENCE dept_seq;

Trigger definition:

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER dept_bir 
BEFORE INSERT ON departments 
FOR EACH ROW

BEGIN
  SELECT dept_seq.NEXTVAL
  INTO   :new.id
  FROM   dual;
END;
/

UPDATE: IDENTITY column is now available on Oracle 12c version, see this:

CREATE TABLE t1 (c1 NUMBER GENERATED BY DEFAULT ON NULL AS IDENTITY, 
                   c2 VARCHAR2(10));
share|improve this answer
17  
Now available in 12c -- IDENTITY columns. You might like to update the answer. docs.oracle.com/cd/E16655_01/gateways.121/e22508/… – David Aldridge Oct 9 '13 at 12:55
1  
I'm a n00b, can you please tell me where dept_seq came from! – Ciwan Feb 24 '14 at 14:59
2  
CREATE SEQUENCE dept_seq; creates dept_seq ... like a table .. but in this case its only a number that you can increase with dept_seq.NEXTVAL ... see the trigger. – Umingo Mar 14 '14 at 15:52
    
As was mentioned, the original code would fail when encountering a line with ID specified. But how about this case: The trigger would assign the id (automatically) only if there was no id specified explicitly in INSERT. This would fail, right? And what is the proper way to do this? – FanaticD Apr 29 '15 at 13:16
1  
For oracle newbies like me, the 'id' part of 'new.id' refers to the column 'id' in the table above. 'new' is a reserved word referring to the new row created – Hoppe Feb 16 at 14:51

SYS_GUID returns a GUID-- a globally unique ID. A SYS_GUID is a RAW(16). It does not generate an incrementing numeric value.

If you want to create an incrementing numeric key, you'll want to create a sequence.

CREATE SEQUENCE name_of_sequence
  START WITH 1
  INCREMENT BY 1
  CACHE 100;

You would then either use that sequence in your INSERT statement

INSERT INTO name_of_table( primary_key_column, <<other columns>> )
  VALUES( name_of_sequence.nextval, <<other values>> );

Or you can define a trigger that automatically populates the primary key value using the sequence

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER trigger_name
  BEFORE INSERT ON table_name
  FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
  SELECT name_of_sequence.nextval
    INTO :new.primary_key_column
    FROM dual;
END;

If you are using Oracle 11.1 or later, you can simplify the trigger a bit

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER trigger_name
  BEFORE INSERT ON table_name
  FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
  :new.primary_key_column := name_of_sequence.nextval;
END;

If you really want to use SYS_GUID

CREATE TABLE table_name (
  primary_key_column raw(16) default sys_guid() primary key,
  <<other columns>>
)
share|improve this answer
    
What does CACHE 100; in CREATE SEQUENCE name_of_sequence START WITH 1 INCREMENT BY 1 CACHE 100; do? – Angelina May 29 '13 at 13:33
2  
CACHE 100: keyword fetches next 100 numbers to memory. Normally a SEQUENCE is saved into database whenever its value changed, if you cache it, it will be saved and retrieved only if cached ones exhausted. Gives you a significant performance gain, but if database fails, you lose all cached values you didn't even use. – Ramazan POLAT Jun 4 '13 at 7:23
1  
A SYS_GUID() is a RAW(16), not 32. – turbanoff Oct 9 '13 at 11:44
2  
@turbanoff - Good catch. Updated my answer. The SYS_GUID documentation declares a raw(32) which confused me. – Justin Cave Oct 9 '13 at 12:30
    
@JustinCave I have used your approach in creating the sequence and trigger. What if I delete a row programmatically (java), will the ID(primary key) gets adjusted as well? – Satyadev Dec 20 '15 at 15:13

Here are three flavors:

  1. numeric. Simple increasing numeric value, e.g. 1,2,3,....
  2. GUID. globally univeral identifier, as a RAW datatype.
  3. GUID (string). Same as above, but as a string which might be easier to handle in some languages.

x is the identity column. Substitute FOO with your table name in each of the examples.

-- numerical identity, e.g. 1,2,3...
create table FOO (
    x number primary key
);
create sequence  FOO_seq;

create or replace trigger FOO_trg
before insert on FOO
for each row
begin
  select FOO_seq.nextval into :new.x from dual;
end;
/

-- GUID identity, e.g. 7CFF0C304187716EE040488AA1F9749A
-- use the commented out lines if you prefer RAW over VARCHAR2.
create table FOO (
    x varchar(32) primary key        -- string version
    -- x raw(32) primary key         -- raw version
);

create or replace trigger FOO_trg
before insert on FOO
for each row
begin
  select cast(sys_guid() as varchar2(32)) into :new.x from dual;  -- string version
  -- select sys_guid() into :new.x from dual;                     -- raw version
end;
/

update:

Oracle 12c introduces these two variants that don't depend on triggers:

create table mytable(id number default mysequence.nextval);
create table mytable(id number generated as identity);

The first one uses a sequence in the traditional way; the second manages the value internally.

share|improve this answer

In Oracle 12c onward you could do something like,

CREATE TABLE MAPS
(
 MAP_ID INTEGER NOT NULL GENERATED ALWAYS AS IDENTITY (START WITH 1, INCREMENT BY 1),
 MAP_NAME VARCHAR(24) NOT NULL,
 UNIQUE (MAP_ID, MAP_NAME)
)

And in Oracle (Pre 12c).

-- create table
CREATE TABLE MAPS
(
 MAP_ID INTEGER NOT NULL ,
 MAP_NAME VARCHAR(24) NOT NULL,
 UNIQUE (MAP_ID, MAP_NAME)
)
--create sequence
CREATE SEQUENCE MAPS_SEQ;
-- create tigger using the sequence
CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER   MAPS_TRG 
BEFORE INSERT ON MAPS 
FOR EACH ROW
WHEN (new.MAP_ID IS NULL)
BEGIN
  SELECT MAP_ID_SEQ.NEXTVAL
  INTO   :new.MAP_ID
  FROM   dual;
END;
/
--enable the trigger
ALTER TRIGGER MAPS_TRG ENABLE ;
share|improve this answer
2  
Very nicely and simple explained. – user1537326 Jun 14 '14 at 18:16
3  
This answer does not add anything not already in the accepted answer. – Jon Heller Jun 15 '14 at 15:48
    
@JonHeller I personally say the IDENTITY example is much clearer in this answer. – EpicPandaForce Mar 23 '15 at 13:55
1  
The WHEN (new.MAP_ID IS NULL) is not in the accepted answer. Upvoted. – dcsohl Apr 30 '15 at 13:31
    
@dcsohl, WHEN ( new.MAP_ID is null) is not a good code in this case and is already explained in the comment section by @A.B.Cade under accepted answer.. have a read;) – ajmalmhd04 May 21 '15 at 1:43

Assuming you mean a column like the SQL Server identity column?

In Oracle, you use a SEQUENCE to achieve the same functionality. I'll see if I can find a good link and post it here.

Update: looks like you found it yourself. Here is the link anyway: http://www.techonthenet.com/oracle/sequences.php

share|improve this answer

Oracle Database 12c introduced Identity, an auto-incremental (system-generated) column. In the previous database versions (until 11g), you usually implement an Identity by creating a Sequence and a Trigger. From 12c onward, you can create your own Table and define the column that has to be generated as an Identity.

The following article explains how to use it:

Identity columns - A new entry in Oracle Database 12c

I hope you will like it.

Corrado.
share|improve this answer
4  
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. – Bridge Oct 10 '13 at 15:13

Trigger and Sequence can be used when you want serialized number that anyone can easily read/remember/understand. But if you don't want to manage ID Column (like emp_id) by this way, and value of this column is not much considerable, you can use SYS_GUID() at Table Creation to get Auto Increment like this.

CREATE TABLE <table_name> 
(emp_id RAW(16) DEFAULT SYS_GUID() PRIMARY KEY,
name VARCHAR2(30));

Now your emp_id column will accept "globally unique identifier value". you can insert value in table by ignoring emp_id column like this.

INSERT INTO <table_name> (name) VALUES ('name value');

So, it will insert unique value to your emp_id Column.

share|improve this answer
    
What happens when a row is deleted? Will the SYS_GUID() its id values as well? – Satyadev Dec 20 '15 at 14:49

Here is complete solution w.r.t exception/error handling for auto increment, this solution is backward compatible and will work on 11g & 12c, specifically if application is in production.

Please replace 'TABLE_NAME' with your appropriate table name

--checking if table already exisits
BEGIN
    EXECUTE IMMEDIATE 'DROP TABLE TABLE_NAME';
    EXCEPTION WHEN OTHERS THEN NULL;
END;
/

--creating table
CREATE TABLE TABLE_NAME (
       ID NUMBER(10) PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL,
       .
       .
       .
);

--checking if sequence already exists
BEGIN
    EXECUTE IMMEDIATE 'DROP SEQUENCE TABLE_NAME_SEQ';
    EXCEPTION WHEN OTHERS THEN NULL;
END;

--creating sequence
/
CREATE SEQUENCE TABLE_NAME_SEQ START WITH 1 INCREMENT BY 1 MINVALUE 1 NOMAXVALUE NOCYCLE CACHE 2;

--granting rights as per required user group
/
GRANT SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE ON TABLE_NAME TO USER_GROUP;

-- creating trigger
/
CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER TABLE_NAME_TS BEFORE INSERT OR UPDATE ON TABLE_NAME FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN    
    -- auto increment column
    SELECT TABLE_NAME_SEQ.NextVal INTO :New.ID FROM dual;

    -- You can also put some other required default data as per need of your columns, for example
    SELECT SYS_CONTEXT('USERENV', 'SESSIONID') INTO :New.SessionID FROM dual;
    SELECT SYS_CONTEXT('USERENV','SERVER_HOST') INTO :New.HostName FROM dual;
    SELECT SYS_CONTEXT('USERENV','OS_USER') INTO :New.LoginID FROM dual;    
    .
    .
    .
END;
/
share|improve this answer

Starting with Oracle 12c there is support for Identity columns in one of two ways:

  1. Sequence + Table - In this solution you still create a sequence as you normally would, then you use the following DDL:

    CREATE TABLE MyTable (ID NUMBER DEFAULT MyTable_Seq.NEXTVAL, ...)

  2. Table Only - In this solution no sequence is explicitly specified. You would use the following DDL:

    CREATE TABLE MyTable (ID NUMBER GENERATED AS IDENTITY, ...)

If you use the first way it is backward compatible with the existing way of doing things. The second is a little more straightforward and is more inline with the rest of the RDMS systems out there.

share|improve this answer

oracle has sequences AND identity columns in 12c

http://www.oracle-base.com/articles/12c/identity-columns-in-oracle-12cr1.php#identity-columns

I found this but not sure what rdb 7 is http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/products/rdb/0307-identity-columns-128126.pdf

share|improve this answer
    
Helpful information and interesting performance comparison. Using IDENTITY columns is better than using a TRIGGER for a SEQUENCE. – ygoe Aug 21 '15 at 8:29

Maybe just try this simple script:

http://www.hlavaj.sk/ai.php

Result is:

CREATE SEQUENCE TABLE_PK_SEQ; 
CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER TR_SEQ_TABLE BEFORE INSERT ON TABLE FOR EACH ROW 

BEGIN
SELECT TABLE_PK_SEQ.NEXTVAL
INTO :new.PK
FROM dual;
END;
share|improve this answer
1  
How is this different than eugnio's answer? Plus: you don't need the select in modern Oracle versions. You can simply use:new.pk := TABLE_PK_SEQ.NEXTVAL – a_horse_with_no_name Sep 2 '15 at 9:46
  create trigger t1_trigger
  before insert on AUDITLOGS
  for each row
   begin
     select t1_seq.nextval into :new.id from dual;
   end;

only I have to just change the table name (AUDITLOGS) with your table name and new.id with new.column_name

share|improve this answer

protected by Jon Heller Mar 23 at 20:11

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.