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I realised that there is no concept of AUTO_INCREMENT on Oracle. How can I use SYS_GUID() to create 'auto increment'?

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1  
You can create a BEFORE INSERT trigger on the table and pull values out of a sequence to create auto-increment –  Hunter McMillen Jul 2 '12 at 15:15
2  
possible duplicate of Autoincrement in Oracle –  A.B.Cade Jul 2 '12 at 15:16
2  
Identity columns are now available in Oracle 12c docs.oracle.com/cd/E16655_01/gateways.121/e22508/… –  David Aldridge Oct 9 '13 at 12:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 70 down vote accepted

There is no such thing as "auto_increment" or "identity" columns in Oracle. However, you can model it easily with a sequence and a trigger:

Table definition:

CREATE TABLE departments (
  ID           NUMBER(10)    NOT NULL,
  DESCRIPTION  VARCHAR2(50)  NOT NULL);

ALTER TABLE departments ADD (
  CONSTRAINT dept_pk PRIMARY KEY (ID));

CREATE SEQUENCE dept_seq;

Trigger definition:

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER dept_bir 
BEFORE INSERT ON departments 
FOR EACH ROW

BEGIN
  SELECT dept_seq.NEXTVAL
  INTO   :new.id
  FROM   dual;
END;
/

UPDATE: IDENTITY column is now available on Oracle 12c version, see this:

CREATE TABLE t1 (c1 NUMBER GENERATED BY DEFAULT ON NULL AS IDENTITY, 
                   c2 VARCHAR2(10));
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13  
What will happen if, lets say, someone will insert a row with id=10000? everything will work fine untill one day an insert will fail, and no one will know why! it will be because the sequence will reach 10000. This is why you shouldn't put WHEN (new.id IS NULL), If you are using a sequence with a trigger then let the sequence give id's always –  A.B.Cade Jul 2 '12 at 15:29
3  
You are totally right, editing. –  Eugenio Cuevas Jul 2 '12 at 16:05
7  
Now available in 12c -- IDENTITY columns. You might like to update the answer. docs.oracle.com/cd/E16655_01/gateways.121/e22508/… –  David Aldridge Oct 9 '13 at 12:55
    
@A.B.Cade On the other hand, if the client is expecting the row to have the ID it specifies, the client code could fail if you replace it. Perhaps the best thing to do when an ID is specified in the INSERT is to throw an error. I would say you either have to honor the specified ID or throw an error. Alternatively (and potentially expensively), you could possibly increment the sequence beyond the ID the client specifies to ensure it is never reused, but the wisdom of that is highly questionable, as well. –  jpmc26 Feb 10 at 7:17
    
I'm a n00b, can you please tell me where dept_seq came from! –  Ciwan Feb 24 at 14:59

SYS_GUID returns a GUID-- a globally unique ID. A SYS_GUID is a RAW(16). It does not generate an incrementing numeric value.

If you want to create an incrementing numeric key, you'll want to create a sequence.

CREATE SEQUENCE name_of_sequence
  START WITH 1
  INCREMENT BY 1
  CACHE 100;

You would then either use that sequence in your INSERT statement

INSERT INTO name_of_table( primary_key_column, <<other columns>> )
  VALUES( name_of_sequence.nextval, <<other values>> );

Or you can define a trigger that automatically populates the primary key value using the sequence

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER trigger_name
  BEFORE INSERT ON table_name
  FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
  SELECT name_of_sequence.nextval
    INTO :new.primary_key_column
    FROM dual;
END;

If you are using Oracle 11.1 or later, you can simplify the trigger a bit

CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER trigger_name
  BEFORE INSERT ON table_name
  FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN
  :new.primary_key_column := name_of_sequence.nextval;
END;

If you really want to use SYS_GUID

CREATE TABLE table_name (
  primary_key_column raw(16) default sys_guid() primary key,
  <<other columns>>
)
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What does CACHE 100; in CREATE SEQUENCE name_of_sequence START WITH 1 INCREMENT BY 1 CACHE 100; do? –  Angelina May 29 '13 at 13:33
1  
CACHE 100: keyword fetches next 100 numbers to memory. Normally a SEQUENCE is saved into database whenever its value changed, if you cache it, it will be saved and retrieved only if cached ones exhausted. Gives you a significant performance gain, but if database fails, you lose all cached values you didn't even use. –  Ramazan POLAT Jun 4 '13 at 7:23
    
A SYS_GUID() is a RAW(16), not 32. –  turbanoff Oct 9 '13 at 11:44
    
@turbanoff - Good catch. Updated my answer. The SYS_GUID documentation declares a raw(32) which confused me. –  Justin Cave Oct 9 '13 at 12:30

Trigger and Sequence can be used when you want serialized number that anyone can easily read/remember/understand. But if you don't want to manage ID Column (like emp_id) by this way, and value of this column is not much considerable, you can use SYS_GUID() at Table Creation to get Auto Increment like this.

CREATE TABLE <table_name> 
(emp_id RAW(16) DEFAULT SYS_GUID() PRIMARY KEY,
name VARCHAR2(30));

Now your emp_id column will accept "globally unique identifier value". you can insert value in table by ignoring emp_id column like this.

INSERT INTO <table_name> (name) VALUES ('name value');

So, it will insert unique value to your emp_id Column.

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In Oracle 12c onward you could do something like,

CREATE TABLE MAPS
(
 MAP_ID INTEGER NOT NULL GENERATED ALWAYS AS IDENTITY (START WITH 1, INCREMENT BY 1),
 MAP_NAME VARCHAR(24) NOT NULL,
 UNIQUE (MAP_ID, MAP_NAME)
)

And in Oracle (Pre 12c).

-- create table
CREATE TABLE MAPS
(
 MAP_ID INTEGER NOT NULL ,
 MAP_NAME VARCHAR(24) NOT NULL,
 UNIQUE (MAP_ID, MAP_NAME)
)
--create sequence
CREATE SEQUENCE MAPS_SEQ;
-- create tigger
CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER   MAPS_TRG 
BEFORE INSERT ON MAPS 
FOR EACH ROW
WHEN (new.MAP_ID IS NULL)
BEGIN
  SELECT MAP_ID_SEQ.NEXTVAL
  INTO   :new.MAP_ID
  FROM   dual;
END;
/
   --enable the trigger
ALTER TRIGGER MAPS_TRG ENABLED ;
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Very nicely and simple explained. –  radha Jun 14 at 18:16
    
This answer does not add anything not already in the accepted answer. –  jonearles Jun 15 at 15:48

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