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Each request in my web app can get one data access object instance (of type UnitofWork), via MVC3's own dependency injection mechanism. So far so good.

I am creating an Idisposable UnitofWorkScope object to aggregate some store calls on this data access object, and to then call them together. Actually the UnitofWorkScope only controls the UnitofWork object, which has the facility for adding stores to a list and calling them later. I believe that the UnitofWorkScope object should have exclusive access the data access object.

Now the question: I am wondering anyone has any objections to an exclusive lock being obtained in the constructor, using Monitor.Enter(), and then released in the dispose method, using Monitor.Exit();

I have muddied the waters a buit by describing why I am asking this, but feel free to comment on anything that I have put here.

public class UnitofWorkScope : IDisposable
{
    public UnitofWorkScope(UnitOfWork UnitofWork)
    {
        if (UnitofWork == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("UnitofWork argument null");
        }  
        this._unitofWork = UnitofWork;
        Monitor.Enter(_unitofWork); // obtaining exclusive access to the DAO of this request
        this._unitofWork.AggregateDbChanges = true; //switched back off in dispose method
    }

    private readonly UnitOfWork _unitofWork;

    bool _disposed;

    public void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!_disposed)
        {
            _unitofWork.CallFuncList();
            Monitor.Exit(_unitofWork); //releasing the lock
            _disposed = true;
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
    }

    ~UnitofWorkScope()
    {
        if (!_disposed)
        {
            Dispose(false);
        }
    }
}

The idea is to use this UnitofWorkScope in like this:

UnitofWork _unitofWork = Resolver.GetService<UnitofWork>(); //gets the UnitofWork DAO

using (UnitofWorkScope UnitofWorkScope = new UnitofWorkScope(_unitOfWork))
{
    // do a store

    _unitofWork.Store<SomeClass>(_someInstance);

   // do some more stores 

   try
   {
        UnitofWorkScope.Dispose(true); 
   }
   catch (exception ex)
   {
     //try to undo those stores.
   }
} 
share|improve this question
    
This will work only if all other places that refer to the _unitOfWork reference also perform the same locking before they call methods on it. Acquiring a lock on an object instance does not prevent other threads from using that instance. All threads that wish to share access to an instance must agree on what lock they will use to synchronize on, and it doesn't matter which object is used as the lock, as long as it is the same for all threads. –  Monroe Thomas Jul 2 '12 at 16:21
    
"I believe that the UnitofWorkScope object should have exclusive access the data access object." - why? what are you using to store your data? I think the whole premise of this question is suspect - assuming you use the same UnitOfWork across your app, this will effectively result in running all requests in serial which will decimate any throughput in your app. –  Martin Ernst Jul 2 '12 at 16:25
1  
The way this is written makes me nervous. Locking during construction and releasing during dispose. Also, you expect dispose to throw, which almost always is a bad thing. If your _unitofWork.CallFuncList() throws you will not have released your lock during the manual call to dispose. The using statement will try to dispose again and cause the same exception. Your finalizer will try to dispose yet again and cause another exception. –  Kenneth Ito Jul 2 '12 at 16:27
    
Martin, there is a new data access object created for each request. –  Elliot Jul 2 '12 at 16:28
1  
If you're creating a new object for each request, there's no need to lock on anything unless you're doing some multi-threaded processing, and even then I think there are better options. Each request will basically be processed on it's own thread, so you don't need to protect against multi-threaded access –  Martin Ernst Jul 2 '12 at 16:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, this is not a bad pattern for implementing locks. However: I would recommend a slightly different version of Dispose to guarantee the lock is released even if _unitofWork.CallFuncList() throws an exception, which you are relying on to detect the need to perform some kind of rollback.

private void Dispose(bool disposing) 
{ 
    if (!_disposed) 
    { 
        try
        {
            _disposed = true; 
            _unitofWork.CallFuncList(); 
        }
        finally
        {
            Monitor.Exit(_unitofWork); //releasing the lock 
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this); 
        }
    } 
} 

However, you may want to separate out the "commit" from the lock "release" logic so that you don't have to explicitly call Dispose(), which the using statement will do automatically for you.

public void Commit()
{
    _unitofWork.CallFuncList(); 
}

private void Dispose(bool disposing) 
{ 
    if (!_disposed) 
    { 
        try
        {
            _disposed = true; 
        }
        finally
        {
            Monitor.Exit(_unitofWork); //releasing the lock 
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this); 
        }
    } 
}

You can then use it like this:

using (var unitofWorkScope = new UnitofWorkScope(_unitOfWork))     
{     
    // do a store     

    _unitofWork.Store<SomeClass>(_someInstance);     

   // do some more stores      

   try     
   {     
        unitofWorkScope.Commit();
   }     
   catch (exception ex)     
   {     
     //try to undo those stores.     
   }     
}  // unitofWorkScope.Dispose() automatically called here
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, good point. –  Elliot Jul 2 '12 at 16:41

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