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Segmentation Fault when attempting to print value in C

I'm very new to C, but have no idea why this program breaks. The program compiles and runs if I remove the lines that have to do with i, but if I assign i, I can no longer assign anything to *ptr without the program breaking.

int main(void)
{
    int i;
    int *ptr;

    i = 2;
    *ptr = 5;
    printf("%d",*ptr);
}
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marked as duplicate by pb2q, Levon, Mark Wilkins, Daniel Fischer, Donal Fellows Jul 2 '12 at 19:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
This nearly identical question was asked just yesterday. –  pb2q Jul 2 '12 at 16:29
    
The problem is that you have created a pointer, but not given it anything to point to. You can assign it some memory using the new, or point it at a variable like i. –  jlunavtgrad Jul 2 '12 at 16:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You leave the pointer with uninitialized value. So when you dereference it (*ptr), you access arbitrary place in memory, resulting in a segmentation fault.

Point ptr at something by assigning to ptr itself (not *ptr) an address of a variable (like &i) or some freshly allocated memory (like malloc(sizeof(int))).

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So why does it work if I simply use int *ptr; *ptr = 5;? –  Rob Volgman Jul 2 '12 at 17:05
    
It might "work" or it might crash, depending on your platform, compiler, settings... Either way, it's incorrect. C is an unsafe language and it doesn't check for memory errors, they might slip unnoticed into your program and strike when not expected. :) –  Kos Jul 2 '12 at 17:07
    
Thanks! I've never worked with a manual memory management language before so this is all new to me. Certainly a lot more to think about. –  Rob Volgman Jul 2 '12 at 17:18

You declared ptr but didn't make it point to anything. Then you tried to write to what it points to. This is never a good idea. Try making ptr point to i by adding the line

ptr = &i;

before you try to write to *ptr

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Here is the answer for C:

int main(void) {
    int i;
    int * ptr = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int));

    i = 2;
    *ptr = 5;     
    printfn("%d",*ptr); 
    free(ptr);
}

Alternatively you could for the i and *ptr assignment lines use something like:

int main(void) {
    int i;
    int * ptr;

    i = 2;
    ptr = &i;     
    printfn("%d",*ptr); // should print 2
}

Notice also that the free came out!!!

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Before using a pointer in C, you need either to set the pointer to an existing block of memory, you need to allocate memory for it, like this.

int *ptr = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int));
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