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I understand, from MSDN, that ClassInitialize is to mark a method that will do setup code for all tests, once, before all tests run. When I include such a method in the abridged fixture below, all tests fail. As soon as I comment it out, they pass again.

[TestClass]
public class AuthenticationTests
{
    [ClassInitialize]
    public void SetupAuth()
    {
        var x = 0;
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestRegisterMemberInit()
    {
        Assert.IsTrue(true);
    }
}
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2  
What does the test failure say? –  Jon Skeet Jul 2 '12 at 16:33
    
Ooops. The error text part of the tests window was 'minimised' away to the bottom. I genuinely didn't know it was even there. Thanks Jon, you made me look all over and eventually find it. –  ProfK Jul 2 '12 at 16:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The [ClassInitialize] decorated method should be static and take exactly one parameter of type TestContext:

[ClassInitialize]
public static void SetupAuth(TestContext context)
{
    var x = 0;
}

In fact, if I copy-paste your code into a clean VS project, the testrunner explains exactly that in the error message:

Method UnitTestProject1.AuthenticationTests.SetupAuth has wrong signature. The method must be static, public, does not return a value and should take a single parameter of type TestContext.

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thanks. As I explained in a comment on my question, that error in the test runner was hidden, i.e. the panel it displays in was too small for me to see. –  ProfK Jul 2 '12 at 17:11

Method marked with [ClassInitialize]:

  1. Apply to only one method of a test class.
  2. The class must be sealed, i.e. not inherited.
  3. The method has to be public static.
  4. The method must pass a TestContext parameter.
  5. The Method does not return a value.
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